Abstract

We report, for what we believe to be the first time, on the feasibility of remote time-resolved filament-induced breakdown spectroscopy (FIBS) of biological materials. The fluorescence from egg white and yeast powder, induced by femtosecond laser pulse filamentation in air, was detected in the backward direction with targets located 3.5m away from the detection system. The remarkably distinct spectra of egg white and yeast allow us to propose that this technique, time-resolved FIBS, could be potentially useful for remote detection and identification of harmful biological agents.

© 2006 Optical Society of America

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