Abstract

In this article, we report the use of a fiber-optic Mach–Zehnder interferometer as a high-precision temperature sensor, and we investigate the effects of small temperature fluctuations on the reliability of the device as a surface biosensor. We found that typical temperature fluctuations generally cause sensor responses large enough that they must be compensated for before reliable surface chemistry measurements can be undertaken. These findings are particularly relevant in light of the recent surge of interest in fiber-optic based biosensors of various designs.

© 2010 Optical Society of America

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