Abstract

In several emerging fields of study such as encryption in optical communications, determination of the number of photons in an optical pulse is of great importance. Typically, such photon-number-resolving sensors require operation at very low temperature (e.g., 4 K for superconducting-based detectors) and are limited to low pixel count (e.g., hundreds). In this paper, a CMOS-based photon-counting image sensor is presented with photon-number-resolving capability that operates at room temperature with resolution of 1 megapixel. Termed a quanta image sensor, the device is implemented in a commercial stacked (3D) backside-illuminated CMOS image sensor process. Without the use of avalanche multiplication, the 1.1 μm pixel-pitch device achieves 0.21erms average read noise with average dark count rate per pixel less than 0.2e/s, and 1040 fps readout rate. This novel platform technology fits the needs of high-speed, high-resolution, and accurate photon-counting imaging for scientific, space, security, and low-light imaging as well as a broader range of other applications.

© 2017 Optical Society of America

1. INTRODUCTION

High-performance photon-counting detectors are widely sought after for applications such as low-light, scientific, and space imaging, as well as automotive sensors and security. Counting error rate, readout speed, spatial resolution, quantum efficiency (QE), and dark current (or dark count rate) are all key factors that contribute to the performance of these sensors. The photon-counting technologies currently available on the market include single-photon avalanche diodes [15] (SPADs) and electron-multiplication charge-coupled devices [6] (EMCCDs). Both devices rely on electron avalanche multiplication to generate a large voltage signal from a single photon. These structures require a high operating voltage to create the critical electric field needed for the avalanche effect, which is not typically compatible with advanced CMOS technology. Hence, these devices cannot take full advantage of advanced CMOS processes, resulting in larger detector size with lower spatial resolution and higher power dissipation. The use of avalanche multiplication also makes both devices more sensitive to dark current, which is usually caused by thermally generated electrons or the re-emission of an electron in an interface trap. At room temperature, the dark count rate for a SPAD-based image sensor ranges from as low as 20 [7] to hundreds of counts/s. The dark current for EMCCDs is often more than 30e/pix/s [8], which limits the lowest illumination level they can detect, so external cooling is always required [9]. Additional in-pixel readout circuitry is required for SPAD-based image sensors to realize in-pixel signal integration for photon-number-resolving operations, which leads to a larger number of transistors to both quench the device and condition the output for integration, resulting in a limited fill-factor (<40%) and low QE (<30%) compared to CMOS image sensors (CISs). In an EMCCD image sensor, the signal photoelectrons must be read out through a long CCD array, which limits the readout speed compared to CISs and restricts it from being used for applications where high temporal resolution is required.

Quanta image sensors (QISs) are a third-generation solid-state image sensor technology [1013]. Compatible with baseline CIS technologies, they inherit CIS advantages in terms of pixel size, spatial resolution, dark current, quantum efficiency (QE), readout speed, and power dissipation. Beyond CIS and existing photon-counting technologies, the QIS aims to realize accurate photon counting without avalanche gain or cooling, while maintaining low dark current and manufacturing cost.

2. THEORY

A. Quanta Image Sensor

A QIS may contain up to several billions of tiny specialized pixels, each called a “jot,” meaning “smallest thing” in Greek. These jots accumulate photoelectrons during an integration period and output a single- or multi-bit value corresponding to the number of collected charges. Compared to a normal CIS pixel, a jot may have a small full-well capacity (FWC) of around 1–200 electrons. In the single-bit case, the array of jots must be scanned at a high frame rate (e.g., 1000 fps) to minimize the chance that a single jot receives more than one photon. After the binary data is collected, image processing is used to combine the jot data over the spatial and temporal domains into image pixels that reflect the photon flux. In this paper, accurate photon-counting imaging is demonstrated with a 1Mjot QIS. The reported jot devices show an average read noise of 0.21erms, with a best-case read noise of 0.17erms from a subset of the measured jots, enabling accurate photoelectron counting. Additionally, an extremely low dark current of less than 0.2ejot/s at room temperature is also demonstrated.

B. Photon Counting and Read Noise

Incident photons are absorbed in silicon and generate electron–hole pairs, and these photoelectrons are measured as a voltage signal in a QIS after being transferred to the floating diffusion (FD) capacitor in a jot device. The voltage signal generated by a photoelectron is

V=QeCFD,
where Qe is the elementary electron charge and CFD is the capacitance of the FD node. Typically, the voltage signal generated by one single electron in a CIS is usually small. To be able to observe the absorption of a single photon, the FD-referred total electrical noise of the sensor, called the read noise, needs to be lower than 0.5erms [1416]. The number of photoelectrons collected by a jot in each frame can be modeled by a Poisson distribution. The read noise in a QIS and other low-noise image sensors is dominated by the noise of the in-pixel source follower (SF). The major contribution is 1/f noise (flicker noise), which is widely believed to be caused by the carrier number fluctuation due to the trapping and re-emission events associated with the Si-SiO2 interface traps near the SF channel. 1/f noise can be well described by a Gaussian distribution [17]. The probability distribution for the normalized output signal of a QIS is given by [15]
P(U)=k=0{12πun2p[(Uk)22un2]eHHkk!},
where U is the normalized voltage signal in e, un is the read noise in erms, k is the number of collected photoelectrons, and H is the quanta exposure, defined as the average number of photoelectrons collected over an integration period. Some simulation results illustrating these distributions are shown in Fig. 1(a), where the quantization of the photoelectron number disappears when the read noise gets to 0.5erms. The valley-to-peak ratio in the probability distribution is very sensitive to the read noise, and the quantization of the photoelectron number is more distinct with lower read noise, which is shown as a lower valley-to-peak ratio. Based upon this effect, a figure of merit called valley-to-peak modulation (VPM) is defined for the experimental characterization of QIS, as well as other photon-counting image sensors [18]. In the experiments, a histogram of the jot signals, called a photon-counting histogram (PCH), can be constructed from thousands of continuous read values under a stable illumination. The read noise can be characterized with the VPM extracted from the PCH, while the voltage signal generated per photoelectron, or conversion gain (CG), can be measured with the peak-to-peak distance.

 figure: Fig. 1.

Fig. 1. Theoretical modeling of photoelectron counting. (a) Probability distribution of the photoelectron voltage signal corrupted with read noise. (b) Illustration of counting error during thresholding to binary output in single-bit QIS. (c) The bit error rate (BER) in single-bit QIS as a function of read noise and quanta exposure H.

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For read noise higher than 0.15erms, the broadening of each peak begins to overlap with its neighboring peaks, which leads to counting errors during the thresholding process of a QIS. As shown in Fig. 1(b), in a single-bit QIS, a threshold is set in the comparators corresponding to the signal level of 0.5e. The overextension of peak-0 and peak-1 lead to the “false positive” and “false negative” counts, respectively. The total bit error rate is directly affected by the read noise and is slightly different as the quanta exposure H varies, as shown in Fig. 1(c). To achieve counting error rate of less than 0.1% for different levels of quanta exposure H, it is preferable to reduce the read noise to 0.15erms or lower.

3. METHODS FOR READ NOISE REDUCTION WITHOUT USING AVALANCHE GAIN

One can either reduce the output voltage noise or increase the CG to reduce the read noise down to photon-counting levels (<0.5erms). Our approach involves minimizing the capacitance of the FD node to increase the CG and overcome the voltage noise. As shown in Fig. 2(a), the FD capacitance in a CIS pixel includes the junction capacitance between the FD n+ node and the p-type substrate, the overlap parasitic capacitance between the FD and transfer gate (TG) as well as between the FD and the reset gate (RG), the source–follower gate capacitance, and the inter-metal coupling capacitance from the wiring. Previously, a pump-gate (PG) jot device was developed by our group [19,20] which significantly reduced the TG overlap capacitance with a distal FD and maintained the charge transfer efficiency with a specialized doping profile in the TG and FD regions. As shown in Fig. 2(b), the specialized doping profile consists of a n-type storage well (SW), a p-well region, a potential barrier (PB) region, and a virtual barrier (VB) region. The PG jot and the tapered reset PG jot (TPG) were prototyped in a 32×32 array, and sub-0.3erms read noise was achieved with a 4× improvement in CG over the typical CIS pixels [2123].

 figure: Fig. 2.

Fig. 2. Introduction of the technologies used for read noise reduction. (a) Schematic of two-way shared readout pump-gate jots with conventional reset mechanism or punch-through reset. (b) Simplified layout of a pump-gate jot with punch-through reset. (c) Cross-section doping profile of the pump-gate jot from 3D TCAD simulation.

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A punch-through reset (PTR) structure has been developed and applied to the PG jot to eliminate the RG overlap capacitance and further improve the CG. The PTR technique was previously invented for faster reset [24] in a large CIS array and reduced reset noise [25], without using correlated double sampling (CDS). The architecture of the PTR diode is illustrated in Figs. 2(b) and 2(c). The PTR diode is a n-p-n junction, and the reset starts when a relatively high positive bias is applied on the reset drain (RD). In the punch-through “on” state, the p-region becomes fully depleted and punch-through occurs. A current path between the FD and the RD is created, and in the “off” state, holes accumulate in the p-region and create a potential barrier to stop current flow between the FD and RD. A similar gateless reset device was recently used to improve the CG of a conventional CIS [26]. Because of the large FWC required by the conventional CIS, the previous use of the punch-through technique with CIS always required a high voltage (>20V) for proper operation. This high voltage is not compatible with baseline CMOS processes, so the implementation becomes more complicated [27]. Since the FWC needed for a QIS is quite small, a PTR diode for QIS can function with regular CMOS operating voltages, such as 2.5 V [28,29].

These read-noise-reduction inventions were implemented in a test chip that contains 20 different 1Mjot QIS imagers. The chip was designed in a TSMC stacked (3D) back-side-illumination (BSI) 45 nm/65 nm CMOS process. The fabrication of the new jots followed the baseline CIS process flow, while implantation modifications were made to realize the desired doping profile for the pump-gate and PTR structures.

4. OVERVIEW OF THE 1MJOT STACKING QIS CHIP

The QIS chip is designed in a two-layer stacked process; the jot devices are fabricated on one wafer, and the readout circuits and control signal drivers are located on the second wafer. The signal from the jots is sent to the signal-processing electronics through millions of tiny wafer interconnections. A cluster-parallel readout architecture is used for the high-speed and low-power operation required for a QIS. The illustrations of the cluster-parallel architecture are shown in Figs. 3(a) and 3(c). A 1Mjot sensor is divided into multiple independent sub-arrays, or clusters. Each cluster has its own dedicated readout unit, and the clusters function in parallel. The cluster-parallel approach allows for the simultaneous improvement of sensor size and readout speed. Additionally, since the cluster design is independent of the array size, this architecture also helps to maintain the speed and performance when the sensor is scaled up to larger sizes (e.g., to 1Gjot) for different applications.

 figure: Fig. 3.

Fig. 3. Illustrations of the architecture of the QIS prototype chip. (a) Simplified architecture of one 1Mjot array with high-speed single-bit digital outputs. (b) Schematic of one digital cluster. (c) Simplified architecture of one 1Mjot array with analog output. (d) Schematic of one analog cluster.

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Of the 20 1Mjot arrays implemented on this chip, 10 are built with analog readout circuitry for the purposes of jot characterization while the other 10 use high-speed, low-power, single-bit digital readout. Within the two groups of 10 arrays, different jot designs are used in each array. All the jots are designed with a 2(H)×1(V) shared architecture with 1.1 μm pitch size. As shown in Fig. 3(d), for the analog readout, the jot reset and signal voltage is first stored in the CDS circuitry, and then each value is amplified by a switched-capacitor programmable gain amplifier sequentially with a gain of 10V/V. An off-chip 14-bit analog-to-digital converter (ADC) is used to quantize the analog signal, the output of which is collected by a high-speed PC interface. There are 16(H)×4(V) clusters and 16 parallel outputs in one analog QIS. As shown in Fig. 3(b), for the high-speed single-bit digital output, the jot outputs are stored in a CDS unit and then connected to the input of a fully differential charge transfer amplifier, which is followed by a low-power d-latch comparator [30,31]. The CDS units in digital clusters share the same architectures as the ones in analog clusters. The differential CDS signal is compared to an externally supplied threshold voltage in the comparator to determine the binary state of a jot signal. The binary signal is then sent off-chip and collected by a high-speed PC interface. There are 16(H)×16(V) clusters and 32 parallel outputs in one digital QIS.

5. EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS

A. Demonstration of Photoelectron Counting

The characterization of the jots was performed with the analog output arrays. The PCH-VPM method was used to characterize the read noise and CG of the jots. In the experiments, each jot was continuously read out 10,000 times under a stable illumination to form a PCH, and the VPM was extracted from the PCH and compared to the analytic model, where a best-fit read noise value was identified. The measurements were performed with a fixed integration time of 120 μs. The PCHs from a PTR jot with 0.17erms read noise are shown in Fig. 4 under four different illumination levels. With such a low read noise level, the quantization of the photoelectron number can be clearly observed, and the photoelectron counting is demonstrated. The same testing was applied to 16,000 jots of each type to analyze the performance variation of the jots. As illustrated in Fig. 5, the PTR jots showed 0.21erms read noise on average, with 15% rms variation. The variation in the read noise is a combination of the variation in the CG and the variation in the output voltage noise of the in-jot SF. The voltage-referred read noise and CG of the tested jots are presented in a scatter plot [Fig. 6(a)]. The dashed lines are illustrated as references showing the electron-referred noise levels. The distribution of the CG and read noise appears to be random and uncorrelated. A rational hypothesis for the variation is that it is a superposition of small, random differences in each jot caused by the fabrication process. For example, small variations in mask dimensions and doping concentrations can lead to differences in CG, and small variations in the number of defects in the in-jot SF can lead to different voltage noise levels in the SF. The TPG jots showed 0.23erms read noise on average, with 15% rms variation. As shown in Fig. 5, the PTR jots have a lower read noise because of their higher CG: 345μV/e for the TPG jots and 368μV/e for the PTR jots on average, both with about 2% rms variation. The 7% improvement in CG comes from the reduction of the RG overlap capacitance in the PTR jots.

 figure: Fig. 4.

Fig. 4. Experimental demonstration of photoelectron counting. Photon-counting histograms of one single PTR jot under four different illumination levels (H). Read noise of 0.17erms is shown from the VPM. 20,000 readouts were used to create each PCH.

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 figure: Fig. 5.

Fig. 5. Histograms of (a) read noise and (b) conversion gain of the TPG and PTR jots.

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 figure: Fig. 6.

Fig. 6. (a) Scatter plot of the voltage-referred read noise versus conversion gain of TPG and PTR jots. (b) Plot of the bit density versus the quanta exposure H. The experimental data from a group of 16k jots and one single jot are compared with the theoretical model with different read noise.

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In a single-bit or multi-bit QIS, the n-bit counting result is created by quantizing the jot signal using (2n1) threshold levels. As a result, the counting result is a function of quanta exposure H and read noise, and can be obtained from Eq. (2) by integration [16]. As illustrated in Fig. 6, the counting result deviates from the quanta exposure as the read noise increases, especially in the sparse illumination region. This effect is caused by the accumulation of false positive counting errors, and the level of alignment between the average counting results and the actual quanta exposures reflects the average counting accuracy. In the experiments, an array of jots was exposed to different illumination levels, and the average count and quanta exposure were extracted from each illumination level. As shown in Fig. 6, the experimental data from an ensemble of 16,000 TPG jots matches the theory for an average read noise of 0.23erms. The same experiment was also performed with a single PTR jot, and the results match the analytic model for a read noise of 0.17erms. It may be noticed that the measured curve for the 16k jots does not extend to the region of H<0.1e. This is because some of the TPG jots exhibit an excessive dark current besides the SW dark current. The excessive dark current is proportional to the duration of the TG pulse width but not correlated to the SW integration time. A similar but stronger effect was discovered with the previous TPG jot test chip, and the details were discussed in Ref. [22]. The suspected cause for this dark current is that the VB region in the pump-gate structure becomes fully depleted while the TG is “on”, which substantially increases the thermal generation rate in that region.

B. Dark Current

In sparse-light conditions, dark current limits the accuracy of a sensor’s photon-counting capability. For example, to measure an illumination level of H=0.1e at 100 fps, the dark current needs to be lower than 10e/s/jot. The dark current generation process can be well modeled by a Shockley–Read–Hall process [32,33]. According to this model, mid-gap traps have the highest generation rate and are widely considered to be the major source of dark current in image sensors. Furthermore, the Si-SiO2 interface is considered to be a major source of the mid-gap traps, as the density of defects is much higher than that of the silicon bulk. The pinned photodiode (PPD) is a well-known device structure that reduces the dark current by covering the surface interface of the photodiode with a shallow p+ pinning layer [34,35]. The pump-gate structure used in the jots can help further reduce the dark current generated from the TG region. Like the PPD, in a PG jot, the surface of the silicon is covered by a shallow p+ pinning layer. Beyond the PPD, a vertical PB is created between the SW and the surface interface underneath the TG [Fig. 7(b)]. During the integration period, the PB region can protect the SW from the dark current generated under the TG, and can effectively steer the dark current towards the FD. As shown in Fig. 7(a), the dark current of the PG jots is as low as 0.16e/s/jot on average at room temperature (23°C) or 2.12pA/cm2, and 1.06e/s/jot at 60°C temperature or 13.9pA/cm2. Since dark current electrons are also quantized, a PCH of the integrated dark current was collected [Fig. 7(c)] from 256×64 jots using 100 frames with a 1.28 s integration time under room temperature.

 figure: Fig. 7.

Fig. 7. Dark-current-related results from experiments and simulations. (a) Probability density distribution of the dark current rate for 16k TPG jots at room temperature (23°C) and 60°C. (b) Simulated 3D potential profile of a TPG jot during the integration period. (c) PCH of thermally generated electrons in darkness for 256×64 TPG jots. The quantization of dark electrons can be observed.

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C. Quantum Efficiency

The CMOS BSI technology can greatly enhance the photosensitive area, or fill-factor, in CMOS image sensors, yielding significant improvements in the QE [3638]. The QE of the jot devices was measured in the visible light region. In the experiments, an integrating sphere was used to ensure uniform illumination over the detectors. A group of white LEDs was used as the light source, and the wavelength of the illumination was selected by a narrow-band (25 nm) bandpass filter. A NIST traceable calibrated optical power meter was used to measure the photon flux for reference. The measured QE is defined as the ratio between the number of photoelectrons counted by the jots and the number of incident photons given by the reference meter during the integration time. Because of the small FWC (200e) for the jot devices, the photon flux in each read was kept low (H<10) to avoid saturating the jots. On the other hand, to ensure the accuracy of the reference meter, relatively strong illumination (>1μW/cm2) was chosen. To satisfy both needs, a short integration time (70 μs) was applied for the jots. Under these conditions, the quanta exposure was kept at around 5e for each read. As shown in Fig. 8(a), the QE for the jot devices is between 70% to 80% for the visible light regime. Note that the measured jots are monochrome, meaning there is no color filter array deposited on the sensor surface. Moreover, as micro-lenses are absent in the measured jots, their addition may help further improve the QE in the future. Technology computer-aided design (TCAD) simulations were used for a better understanding of the experimental results. In the simulation, the backside of the jot device was prepared with a standard anti-reflection coating based on silicon nitride. Both results are illustrated in Fig. 8. As shown, the experimental QE has a good match with the simulation for the 550 to 650 nm wavelength regime. On the other hand, the experimental QE is lower than the simulation results in the blue light region (450–500 nm). As the blue photons are absorbed closer to the backside surface, more interaction with the backside interface traps is expected. The random trapping events can cause the observed reduction of QE. It is hard to model this effect in the simulation without prior knowledge of the trap density and energy, and this might lead to the difference in QE in the blue light region. In general, the loss of incident photons can be categorized into three sources: (1) photons that are reflected off the backside surface; (2) photons that transmit through the silicon substrate; (3) photoelectrons that are lost in the silicon (recombined or collected by the in-jot transistors). The simulated distribution of the incident light is shown in Fig. 8(b).

 figure: Fig. 8.

Fig. 8. (a) Experimental and simulated quantum efficiency results for the visible wavelength range. (b) Simulated distribution of incident photons going into a TPG jot.

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D. High-Speed Single-Photon Imaging

The high-speed operation of the 1Mjot QIS can be achieved with the single-bit output mode. In this mode, an external reference voltage is supplied to the comparators for thresholding the jot output into a binary number. The reference voltage corresponding to 0.5e was calibrated using the average CG measurement results. A sample binary image taken with the QIS is shown in Figs. 9(a)9(c). When the image was taken, the sensor was operating at 1040 fps, and the power dissipation of the whole sensor was 17 mW. Some fix pattern noise was observed in the results, and the cause is still under investigation. We believe that it can be fixed with some wiring improvements in the layout. Binning of jot bits was applied to create the grayscale image pixels. In this example, 8×8×8 jots are combined to create one image pixel, and a QIS de-noising algorithm recently developed at Purdue was applied to the final image [39,40]. The result is shown in Fig. 9(d).

 figure: Fig. 9.

Fig. 9. Illustration of the image-formation process with the sample image from the 1Mjot QIS prototype chip operating at 1040 fps. (a) Magnified area in one field of binary single-photon data (1024×1024) grabbed from the 1Mjot QIS. (b) Same area in the binary field data with lower magnification. (c) Raw binary QIS output images, including eight continuous frames. (d) Gray-scale image processed with 8×8×8 jot cubicles using Purdue de-noising algorithm [39,40] for 128×128 resolution.

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6. CONCLUSION

In this paper, the concept behind the QIS is reviewed, the fundamental requirements for photon counting are discussed, and the characterization results of the QIS prototype chip are presented. A summary of the discussed results is shown in Table 1. To address the disadvantages of the current state-of-the-art single-photon detectors, jot devices with ultra-low read noise were developed for photon counting at room temperature without using electron avalanche gain. The read noise has been reduced to as low as 0.17erms through several inventions, and the photon-counting capability of the jot devices is demonstrated with a 1Mjot QIS prototype chip. Given its importance in high-quality photon-counting imaging, the ultra-low dark current is demonstrated both at room temperature and in a heated environment (60°C). Moreover, the QE in the visible-light wavelength range is reported and discussed. The high-speed single-photon imaging was tested, and 1040 fps readout speed is demonstrated at 1Mjot resolution. The QIS technology is qualified for high-speed photon-counting imaging with high spatial resolution, and we expect it will be widely adopted in scientific and space imaging, life science, security, automotive, and other applications in the near future.

Tables Icon

Table 1. Characterization Results of the Prototype 1Mjot QIS

Funding

Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) (W911NF-16-2-0162); Rambus.

Acknowledgment

The chip design work was partially sponsored by Rambus Inc. The characterization work was sponsored by the DARPA DETECT program through ARO. The views and conclusions contained in this document are those of the authors and should not be interpreted as representing the official policies, either expressed or implied, of the Army Research Office or the U.S. Government. The authors are grateful for the support from both organizations, and are also grateful for the technical support from TSMC.

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25. R. M. Guidash and P. P. Lee, “Active pixel sensor with punch-through reset and cross-talk suppression,” U.S. patent 5,872,371 A (February 27, 1997).

26. M.-W. Seo, S. Kawahito, K. Kagawa, and K. Yasutomi, “A 0.27e− rms read noise 220-uV/e-conversion gain reset-gate-less CMOS image sensor with 0.11-μm CIS process,” IEEE Electron Device Lett. 36, 997–1000 (2015). [CrossRef]  

27. M.-W. Seo, T. Wang, S.-W. Jun, T. Akahori, and S. Kawahito, “A 0.44e− rms read-noise 32 fps 0.5Mpixel high-sensitivity RG-less-pixel CMOS image sensor using bootstrapping reset,” in IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference (ISSCC) (IEEE, 2017), pp. 80–81.

28. E. R. Fossum and J. Ma, “Gateless reset for image sensor pixels,” U.S. patent Prov. App. 62/128, 983 (May 3, 2015).

29. J. Ma and E. R. Fossum, “Analytical modeling and TCAD simulation of a quanta image sensor jot device with a JFET source-follower for deep sub-electron read noise,” IEEE J. Electron Devices Soc. 5, 69–78 (2017). [CrossRef]  

30. S. Masoodian, K. Odame, and E. R. Fossum, “Low-power readout circuit for quanta image sensors,” Electron. Lett. 50, 589–591 (2014). [CrossRef]  

31. S. Masoodian, A. Rao, J. Ma, K. Odame, and E. R. Fossum, “A 2.5 pJ/b binary image sensor as a pathfinder for quanta image sensors,” IEEE Trans. Electron Devices 63, 100–105 (2016). [CrossRef]  

32. S. M. Sze, Semiconductor Sensors (Wiley, 1994), Vol. 55.

33. N. Teranishi, “Effect and limitation of pinned photodiode,” IEEE Trans. Electron Devices 63, 10–15 (2016). [CrossRef]  

34. N. Teranishi, A. Kohono, Y. Ishihara, E. Oda, and K. Arai, “No image lag photodiode structure in the interline CCD image sensor,” in International Electron Devices Meeting (IEEE, 1982), pp. 324–327.

35. E. R. Fossum and D. B. Hondongwa, “A review of the pinned photodiode for CCD and CMOS image sensors,” IEEE J. Electron Devices Soc. 2, 33–43 (2014). [CrossRef]  

36. B. Pain, T. Cunningham, S. Nikzad, M. Hoenk, T. Jones, C. Wrigley, and B. Hancock, “A back-illuminated megapixel CMOS image sensor,” in IEEE Workshop on Charge-Coupled Devices and Advanced Image Sensors (NASA, 2005).

37. S. G. Wuu, C. C. Wang, B. C. Hseih, Y. L. Tu, C. H. Tseng, T. H. Hsu, R. S. Hsiao, S. Takahashi, R. J. Lin, and C. S. Tsai, “A leading-edge 0.9 μm pixel CMOS image sensor technology with backside illumination: future challenges for pixel scaling,” in IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM) (IEEE, 2010), pp. 14.1.1–14.1.4.

38. J. Ahn, C.-R. Moon, B. Kim, K. Lee, Y. Kim, M. Lim, W. Lee, H. Park, K. Moon, and J. Yoo, “Advanced image sensor technology for pixel scaling down toward 1.0 μm,” in IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM) (IEEE, 2008), pp. 1–4.

39. S. H. Chan and Y. M. Lu, “Efficient image reconstruction for gigapixel quantum image sensors,” in IEEE Global Conference on Signal and Information Processing (GlobalSIP) (IEEE, 2014), pp. 312–316.

40. S. H. Chan, O. A. Elgendy, and X. Wang, “Images from bits: non-iterative image reconstruction for quanta image sensors,” Sensors 16, 1961 (2016). [CrossRef]  

References

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  1. B. F. Aull, A. H. Loomis, D. J. Young, R. M. Heinrichs, B. J. Felton, P. J. Daniels, and D. J. Landers, “Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes for three-dimensional imaging,” Lincoln Lab. J. 13, 335–349 (2002).
  2. N. A. W. Dutton, L. Parmesan, A. J. Holmes, L. A. Grant, and R. K. Henderson, “320 × 240 oversampled digital single photon counting image sensor,” in Symposium on VLSI Circuits Digest of Technical Papers (IEEE, 2014), pp. 1–2.
  3. E. Charbon, “Towards large scale CMOS single-photon detector arrays for lab-on-chip applications,” J. Phys. D 41, 094010 (2008).
    [Crossref]
  4. E. Charbon, “Will avalanche photodiode arrays ever reach 1 megapixel,” in International Image Sensor Workshop (2007).
  5. N. A. W. Dutton, I. Gyongy, L. Parmesan, and R. K. Henderson, “Single photon counting performance and noise analysis of CMOS SPAD-based image sensors,” Sensors 16, 1122 (2016).
    [Crossref]
  6. J. Hynecek, “Impactron-a new solid state image intensifier,” IEEE Trans. Electron Devices 48, 2238–2241 (2001).
    [Crossref]
  7. J. A. Richardson, L. A. Grant, and R. K. Henderson, “Low dark count single-photon avalanche diode structure compatible with standard nanometer scale CMOS technology,” IEEE Photon. Technol. Lett. 21, 1020–1022 (2009).
    [Crossref]
  8. C. Parks, S. Kosman, E. Nelson, N. Roberts, and S. Yaniga, “A 30  Fps 1920 × 1080 pixel electron multiplying CCD image sensor with per-pixel switchable gain,” in International Image Sensor Workshop (IISW), Vaals, The Netherlands, June8-11,2015, pp. 8–11.
  9. M. S. Robbins and B. J. Hadwen, “The noise performance of electron multiplying charge-coupled devices,” IEEE Trans. Electron Devices 50, 1227–1232 (2003).
    [Crossref]
  10. E. R. Fossum, “Image sensor using single photon jots and processor to create pixels,” U.S. patent8,648,287 B1 (May26, 2006).
  11. E. R. Fossum, “What to do with sub-diffraction-limit (SDL) pixels? A proposal for a gigapixel digital film sensor (DFS),” in IEEE Workshop on Charge-Coupled Devices and Advanced Image Sensors (2005), pp. 214–217.
  12. E. R. Fossum, “The quanta image sensor (QIS): concepts and challenges,” in Computational Optical Sensing and Imaging (Optical Society of America, 2011), paper JTuE1.
  13. E. R. Fossum, J. Ma, S. Masoodian, L. Anzagira, and R. Zizza, “The quanta image sensor: every photon counts,” Sensors 16, 1260 (2016).
    [Crossref]
  14. N. Teranishi, “Required conditions for photon-counting image sensors,” IEEE Trans. Electron Devices 59, 2199–2205 (2012).
    [Crossref]
  15. E. R. Fossum, “Modeling the performance of single-bit and multi-bit quanta image sensors,” IEEE J. Electron Devices Soc. 1, 166–174 (2013).
    [Crossref]
  16. E. R. Fossum, “Photon counting error rates in single-bit and multi-bit quanta image sensors,” IEEE J. Electron Devices Soc. 4, 136–143 (2016).
    [Crossref]
  17. D. M. Fleetwood, “1/f noise and defects in microelectronic materials and devices,” IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. 62, 1462–1486 (2015).
    [Crossref]
  18. D. A. Starkey and E. R. Fossum, “Determining conversion gain and read noise using a photon-counting histogram method for deep sub-electron read noise image sensors,” IEEE J. Electron Devices Soc. 4, 129–135 (2016).
    [Crossref]
  19. J. Ma, D. Hondongwa, and E. R. Fossum, “Jot devices and the quanta image sensor,” in IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting (IEEE, 2014), pp. 10.1.1–10.1.4.
  20. J. Ma and E. R. Fossum, “A pump-gate jot device with high conversion gain for a quanta image sensor,” IEEE J. Electron Devices Soc. 3, 73–77 (2015).
    [Crossref]
  21. J. Ma and E. R. Fossum, “Quanta image sensor jot with sub 0.3e−  r.m.s. read noise and photon counting capability,” IEEE Electron Device Lett. 36, 926–928 (2015).
    [Crossref]
  22. J. Ma, D. Starkey, A. Rao, K. Odame, and E. R. Fossum, “Characterization of quanta image sensor pump-gate jots with deep sub-electron read noise,” IEEE J. Electron Devices Soc. 3, 472–480 (2015).
    [Crossref]
  23. J. Ma, L. Anzagira, and E. R. Fossum, “A 1  μm-pitch quanta image sensor jot device with shared readout,” IEEE J. Electron Devices Soc. 4, 83–89 (2016).
    [Crossref]
  24. R. M. Guidash, “Solid state image sensor with fast reset,” U.S. patent5,338,946 A (January8, 1993).
  25. R. M. Guidash and P. P. Lee, “Active pixel sensor with punch-through reset and cross-talk suppression,” U.S. patent5,872,371 A (February27, 1997).
  26. M.-W. Seo, S. Kawahito, K. Kagawa, and K. Yasutomi, “A 0.27e−  rms read noise 220-uV/e-conversion gain reset-gate-less CMOS image sensor with 0.11-μm CIS process,” IEEE Electron Device Lett. 36, 997–1000 (2015).
    [Crossref]
  27. M.-W. Seo, T. Wang, S.-W. Jun, T. Akahori, and S. Kawahito, “A 0.44e−  rms read-noise 32  fps 0.5Mpixel high-sensitivity RG-less-pixel CMOS image sensor using bootstrapping reset,” in IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference (ISSCC) (IEEE, 2017), pp. 80–81.
  28. E. R. Fossum and J. Ma, “Gateless reset for image sensor pixels,” U.S. patentProv. App. 62/128, 983 (May3, 2015).
  29. J. Ma and E. R. Fossum, “Analytical modeling and TCAD simulation of a quanta image sensor jot device with a JFET source-follower for deep sub-electron read noise,” IEEE J. Electron Devices Soc. 5, 69–78 (2017).
    [Crossref]
  30. S. Masoodian, K. Odame, and E. R. Fossum, “Low-power readout circuit for quanta image sensors,” Electron. Lett. 50, 589–591 (2014).
    [Crossref]
  31. S. Masoodian, A. Rao, J. Ma, K. Odame, and E. R. Fossum, “A 2.5  pJ/b binary image sensor as a pathfinder for quanta image sensors,” IEEE Trans. Electron Devices 63, 100–105 (2016).
    [Crossref]
  32. S. M. Sze, Semiconductor Sensors (Wiley, 1994), Vol. 55.
  33. N. Teranishi, “Effect and limitation of pinned photodiode,” IEEE Trans. Electron Devices 63, 10–15 (2016).
    [Crossref]
  34. N. Teranishi, A. Kohono, Y. Ishihara, E. Oda, and K. Arai, “No image lag photodiode structure in the interline CCD image sensor,” in International Electron Devices Meeting (IEEE, 1982), pp. 324–327.
  35. E. R. Fossum and D. B. Hondongwa, “A review of the pinned photodiode for CCD and CMOS image sensors,” IEEE J. Electron Devices Soc. 2, 33–43 (2014).
    [Crossref]
  36. B. Pain, T. Cunningham, S. Nikzad, M. Hoenk, T. Jones, C. Wrigley, and B. Hancock, “A back-illuminated megapixel CMOS image sensor,” in IEEE Workshop on Charge-Coupled Devices and Advanced Image Sensors (NASA, 2005).
  37. S. G. Wuu, C. C. Wang, B. C. Hseih, Y. L. Tu, C. H. Tseng, T. H. Hsu, R. S. Hsiao, S. Takahashi, R. J. Lin, and C. S. Tsai, “A leading-edge 0.9  μm pixel CMOS image sensor technology with backside illumination: future challenges for pixel scaling,” in IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM) (IEEE, 2010), pp. 14.1.1–14.1.4.
  38. J. Ahn, C.-R. Moon, B. Kim, K. Lee, Y. Kim, M. Lim, W. Lee, H. Park, K. Moon, and J. Yoo, “Advanced image sensor technology for pixel scaling down toward 1.0  μm,” in IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM) (IEEE, 2008), pp. 1–4.
  39. S. H. Chan and Y. M. Lu, “Efficient image reconstruction for gigapixel quantum image sensors,” in IEEE Global Conference on Signal and Information Processing (GlobalSIP) (IEEE, 2014), pp. 312–316.
  40. S. H. Chan, O. A. Elgendy, and X. Wang, “Images from bits: non-iterative image reconstruction for quanta image sensors,” Sensors 16, 1961 (2016).
    [Crossref]

2017 (1)

J. Ma and E. R. Fossum, “Analytical modeling and TCAD simulation of a quanta image sensor jot device with a JFET source-follower for deep sub-electron read noise,” IEEE J. Electron Devices Soc. 5, 69–78 (2017).
[Crossref]

2016 (8)

S. Masoodian, A. Rao, J. Ma, K. Odame, and E. R. Fossum, “A 2.5  pJ/b binary image sensor as a pathfinder for quanta image sensors,” IEEE Trans. Electron Devices 63, 100–105 (2016).
[Crossref]

N. Teranishi, “Effect and limitation of pinned photodiode,” IEEE Trans. Electron Devices 63, 10–15 (2016).
[Crossref]

S. H. Chan, O. A. Elgendy, and X. Wang, “Images from bits: non-iterative image reconstruction for quanta image sensors,” Sensors 16, 1961 (2016).
[Crossref]

N. A. W. Dutton, I. Gyongy, L. Parmesan, and R. K. Henderson, “Single photon counting performance and noise analysis of CMOS SPAD-based image sensors,” Sensors 16, 1122 (2016).
[Crossref]

E. R. Fossum, J. Ma, S. Masoodian, L. Anzagira, and R. Zizza, “The quanta image sensor: every photon counts,” Sensors 16, 1260 (2016).
[Crossref]

D. A. Starkey and E. R. Fossum, “Determining conversion gain and read noise using a photon-counting histogram method for deep sub-electron read noise image sensors,” IEEE J. Electron Devices Soc. 4, 129–135 (2016).
[Crossref]

E. R. Fossum, “Photon counting error rates in single-bit and multi-bit quanta image sensors,” IEEE J. Electron Devices Soc. 4, 136–143 (2016).
[Crossref]

J. Ma, L. Anzagira, and E. R. Fossum, “A 1  μm-pitch quanta image sensor jot device with shared readout,” IEEE J. Electron Devices Soc. 4, 83–89 (2016).
[Crossref]

2015 (5)

M.-W. Seo, S. Kawahito, K. Kagawa, and K. Yasutomi, “A 0.27e−  rms read noise 220-uV/e-conversion gain reset-gate-less CMOS image sensor with 0.11-μm CIS process,” IEEE Electron Device Lett. 36, 997–1000 (2015).
[Crossref]

D. M. Fleetwood, “1/f noise and defects in microelectronic materials and devices,” IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. 62, 1462–1486 (2015).
[Crossref]

J. Ma and E. R. Fossum, “A pump-gate jot device with high conversion gain for a quanta image sensor,” IEEE J. Electron Devices Soc. 3, 73–77 (2015).
[Crossref]

J. Ma and E. R. Fossum, “Quanta image sensor jot with sub 0.3e−  r.m.s. read noise and photon counting capability,” IEEE Electron Device Lett. 36, 926–928 (2015).
[Crossref]

J. Ma, D. Starkey, A. Rao, K. Odame, and E. R. Fossum, “Characterization of quanta image sensor pump-gate jots with deep sub-electron read noise,” IEEE J. Electron Devices Soc. 3, 472–480 (2015).
[Crossref]

2014 (2)

E. R. Fossum and D. B. Hondongwa, “A review of the pinned photodiode for CCD and CMOS image sensors,” IEEE J. Electron Devices Soc. 2, 33–43 (2014).
[Crossref]

S. Masoodian, K. Odame, and E. R. Fossum, “Low-power readout circuit for quanta image sensors,” Electron. Lett. 50, 589–591 (2014).
[Crossref]

2013 (1)

E. R. Fossum, “Modeling the performance of single-bit and multi-bit quanta image sensors,” IEEE J. Electron Devices Soc. 1, 166–174 (2013).
[Crossref]

2012 (1)

N. Teranishi, “Required conditions for photon-counting image sensors,” IEEE Trans. Electron Devices 59, 2199–2205 (2012).
[Crossref]

2009 (1)

J. A. Richardson, L. A. Grant, and R. K. Henderson, “Low dark count single-photon avalanche diode structure compatible with standard nanometer scale CMOS technology,” IEEE Photon. Technol. Lett. 21, 1020–1022 (2009).
[Crossref]

2008 (1)

E. Charbon, “Towards large scale CMOS single-photon detector arrays for lab-on-chip applications,” J. Phys. D 41, 094010 (2008).
[Crossref]

2003 (1)

M. S. Robbins and B. J. Hadwen, “The noise performance of electron multiplying charge-coupled devices,” IEEE Trans. Electron Devices 50, 1227–1232 (2003).
[Crossref]

2002 (1)

B. F. Aull, A. H. Loomis, D. J. Young, R. M. Heinrichs, B. J. Felton, P. J. Daniels, and D. J. Landers, “Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes for three-dimensional imaging,” Lincoln Lab. J. 13, 335–349 (2002).

2001 (1)

J. Hynecek, “Impactron-a new solid state image intensifier,” IEEE Trans. Electron Devices 48, 2238–2241 (2001).
[Crossref]

Ahn, J.

J. Ahn, C.-R. Moon, B. Kim, K. Lee, Y. Kim, M. Lim, W. Lee, H. Park, K. Moon, and J. Yoo, “Advanced image sensor technology for pixel scaling down toward 1.0  μm,” in IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM) (IEEE, 2008), pp. 1–4.

Akahori, T.

M.-W. Seo, T. Wang, S.-W. Jun, T. Akahori, and S. Kawahito, “A 0.44e−  rms read-noise 32  fps 0.5Mpixel high-sensitivity RG-less-pixel CMOS image sensor using bootstrapping reset,” in IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference (ISSCC) (IEEE, 2017), pp. 80–81.

Anzagira, L.

J. Ma, L. Anzagira, and E. R. Fossum, “A 1  μm-pitch quanta image sensor jot device with shared readout,” IEEE J. Electron Devices Soc. 4, 83–89 (2016).
[Crossref]

E. R. Fossum, J. Ma, S. Masoodian, L. Anzagira, and R. Zizza, “The quanta image sensor: every photon counts,” Sensors 16, 1260 (2016).
[Crossref]

Arai, K.

N. Teranishi, A. Kohono, Y. Ishihara, E. Oda, and K. Arai, “No image lag photodiode structure in the interline CCD image sensor,” in International Electron Devices Meeting (IEEE, 1982), pp. 324–327.

Aull, B. F.

B. F. Aull, A. H. Loomis, D. J. Young, R. M. Heinrichs, B. J. Felton, P. J. Daniels, and D. J. Landers, “Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes for three-dimensional imaging,” Lincoln Lab. J. 13, 335–349 (2002).

Chan, S. H.

S. H. Chan, O. A. Elgendy, and X. Wang, “Images from bits: non-iterative image reconstruction for quanta image sensors,” Sensors 16, 1961 (2016).
[Crossref]

S. H. Chan and Y. M. Lu, “Efficient image reconstruction for gigapixel quantum image sensors,” in IEEE Global Conference on Signal and Information Processing (GlobalSIP) (IEEE, 2014), pp. 312–316.

Charbon, E.

E. Charbon, “Towards large scale CMOS single-photon detector arrays for lab-on-chip applications,” J. Phys. D 41, 094010 (2008).
[Crossref]

E. Charbon, “Will avalanche photodiode arrays ever reach 1 megapixel,” in International Image Sensor Workshop (2007).

Cunningham, T.

B. Pain, T. Cunningham, S. Nikzad, M. Hoenk, T. Jones, C. Wrigley, and B. Hancock, “A back-illuminated megapixel CMOS image sensor,” in IEEE Workshop on Charge-Coupled Devices and Advanced Image Sensors (NASA, 2005).

Daniels, P. J.

B. F. Aull, A. H. Loomis, D. J. Young, R. M. Heinrichs, B. J. Felton, P. J. Daniels, and D. J. Landers, “Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes for three-dimensional imaging,” Lincoln Lab. J. 13, 335–349 (2002).

Dutton, N. A. W.

N. A. W. Dutton, I. Gyongy, L. Parmesan, and R. K. Henderson, “Single photon counting performance and noise analysis of CMOS SPAD-based image sensors,” Sensors 16, 1122 (2016).
[Crossref]

N. A. W. Dutton, L. Parmesan, A. J. Holmes, L. A. Grant, and R. K. Henderson, “320 × 240 oversampled digital single photon counting image sensor,” in Symposium on VLSI Circuits Digest of Technical Papers (IEEE, 2014), pp. 1–2.

Elgendy, O. A.

S. H. Chan, O. A. Elgendy, and X. Wang, “Images from bits: non-iterative image reconstruction for quanta image sensors,” Sensors 16, 1961 (2016).
[Crossref]

Felton, B. J.

B. F. Aull, A. H. Loomis, D. J. Young, R. M. Heinrichs, B. J. Felton, P. J. Daniels, and D. J. Landers, “Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes for three-dimensional imaging,” Lincoln Lab. J. 13, 335–349 (2002).

Fleetwood, D. M.

D. M. Fleetwood, “1/f noise and defects in microelectronic materials and devices,” IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. 62, 1462–1486 (2015).
[Crossref]

Fossum, E. R.

J. Ma and E. R. Fossum, “Analytical modeling and TCAD simulation of a quanta image sensor jot device with a JFET source-follower for deep sub-electron read noise,” IEEE J. Electron Devices Soc. 5, 69–78 (2017).
[Crossref]

S. Masoodian, A. Rao, J. Ma, K. Odame, and E. R. Fossum, “A 2.5  pJ/b binary image sensor as a pathfinder for quanta image sensors,” IEEE Trans. Electron Devices 63, 100–105 (2016).
[Crossref]

E. R. Fossum, “Photon counting error rates in single-bit and multi-bit quanta image sensors,” IEEE J. Electron Devices Soc. 4, 136–143 (2016).
[Crossref]

D. A. Starkey and E. R. Fossum, “Determining conversion gain and read noise using a photon-counting histogram method for deep sub-electron read noise image sensors,” IEEE J. Electron Devices Soc. 4, 129–135 (2016).
[Crossref]

J. Ma, L. Anzagira, and E. R. Fossum, “A 1  μm-pitch quanta image sensor jot device with shared readout,” IEEE J. Electron Devices Soc. 4, 83–89 (2016).
[Crossref]

E. R. Fossum, J. Ma, S. Masoodian, L. Anzagira, and R. Zizza, “The quanta image sensor: every photon counts,” Sensors 16, 1260 (2016).
[Crossref]

J. Ma and E. R. Fossum, “A pump-gate jot device with high conversion gain for a quanta image sensor,” IEEE J. Electron Devices Soc. 3, 73–77 (2015).
[Crossref]

J. Ma and E. R. Fossum, “Quanta image sensor jot with sub 0.3e−  r.m.s. read noise and photon counting capability,” IEEE Electron Device Lett. 36, 926–928 (2015).
[Crossref]

J. Ma, D. Starkey, A. Rao, K. Odame, and E. R. Fossum, “Characterization of quanta image sensor pump-gate jots with deep sub-electron read noise,” IEEE J. Electron Devices Soc. 3, 472–480 (2015).
[Crossref]

S. Masoodian, K. Odame, and E. R. Fossum, “Low-power readout circuit for quanta image sensors,” Electron. Lett. 50, 589–591 (2014).
[Crossref]

E. R. Fossum and D. B. Hondongwa, “A review of the pinned photodiode for CCD and CMOS image sensors,” IEEE J. Electron Devices Soc. 2, 33–43 (2014).
[Crossref]

E. R. Fossum, “Modeling the performance of single-bit and multi-bit quanta image sensors,” IEEE J. Electron Devices Soc. 1, 166–174 (2013).
[Crossref]

J. Ma, D. Hondongwa, and E. R. Fossum, “Jot devices and the quanta image sensor,” in IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting (IEEE, 2014), pp. 10.1.1–10.1.4.

E. R. Fossum and J. Ma, “Gateless reset for image sensor pixels,” U.S. patentProv. App. 62/128, 983 (May3, 2015).

E. R. Fossum, “Image sensor using single photon jots and processor to create pixels,” U.S. patent8,648,287 B1 (May26, 2006).

E. R. Fossum, “What to do with sub-diffraction-limit (SDL) pixels? A proposal for a gigapixel digital film sensor (DFS),” in IEEE Workshop on Charge-Coupled Devices and Advanced Image Sensors (2005), pp. 214–217.

E. R. Fossum, “The quanta image sensor (QIS): concepts and challenges,” in Computational Optical Sensing and Imaging (Optical Society of America, 2011), paper JTuE1.

Grant, L. A.

J. A. Richardson, L. A. Grant, and R. K. Henderson, “Low dark count single-photon avalanche diode structure compatible with standard nanometer scale CMOS technology,” IEEE Photon. Technol. Lett. 21, 1020–1022 (2009).
[Crossref]

N. A. W. Dutton, L. Parmesan, A. J. Holmes, L. A. Grant, and R. K. Henderson, “320 × 240 oversampled digital single photon counting image sensor,” in Symposium on VLSI Circuits Digest of Technical Papers (IEEE, 2014), pp. 1–2.

Guidash, R. M.

R. M. Guidash, “Solid state image sensor with fast reset,” U.S. patent5,338,946 A (January8, 1993).

R. M. Guidash and P. P. Lee, “Active pixel sensor with punch-through reset and cross-talk suppression,” U.S. patent5,872,371 A (February27, 1997).

Gyongy, I.

N. A. W. Dutton, I. Gyongy, L. Parmesan, and R. K. Henderson, “Single photon counting performance and noise analysis of CMOS SPAD-based image sensors,” Sensors 16, 1122 (2016).
[Crossref]

Hadwen, B. J.

M. S. Robbins and B. J. Hadwen, “The noise performance of electron multiplying charge-coupled devices,” IEEE Trans. Electron Devices 50, 1227–1232 (2003).
[Crossref]

Hancock, B.

B. Pain, T. Cunningham, S. Nikzad, M. Hoenk, T. Jones, C. Wrigley, and B. Hancock, “A back-illuminated megapixel CMOS image sensor,” in IEEE Workshop on Charge-Coupled Devices and Advanced Image Sensors (NASA, 2005).

Heinrichs, R. M.

B. F. Aull, A. H. Loomis, D. J. Young, R. M. Heinrichs, B. J. Felton, P. J. Daniels, and D. J. Landers, “Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes for three-dimensional imaging,” Lincoln Lab. J. 13, 335–349 (2002).

Henderson, R. K.

N. A. W. Dutton, I. Gyongy, L. Parmesan, and R. K. Henderson, “Single photon counting performance and noise analysis of CMOS SPAD-based image sensors,” Sensors 16, 1122 (2016).
[Crossref]

J. A. Richardson, L. A. Grant, and R. K. Henderson, “Low dark count single-photon avalanche diode structure compatible with standard nanometer scale CMOS technology,” IEEE Photon. Technol. Lett. 21, 1020–1022 (2009).
[Crossref]

N. A. W. Dutton, L. Parmesan, A. J. Holmes, L. A. Grant, and R. K. Henderson, “320 × 240 oversampled digital single photon counting image sensor,” in Symposium on VLSI Circuits Digest of Technical Papers (IEEE, 2014), pp. 1–2.

Hoenk, M.

B. Pain, T. Cunningham, S. Nikzad, M. Hoenk, T. Jones, C. Wrigley, and B. Hancock, “A back-illuminated megapixel CMOS image sensor,” in IEEE Workshop on Charge-Coupled Devices and Advanced Image Sensors (NASA, 2005).

Holmes, A. J.

N. A. W. Dutton, L. Parmesan, A. J. Holmes, L. A. Grant, and R. K. Henderson, “320 × 240 oversampled digital single photon counting image sensor,” in Symposium on VLSI Circuits Digest of Technical Papers (IEEE, 2014), pp. 1–2.

Hondongwa, D.

J. Ma, D. Hondongwa, and E. R. Fossum, “Jot devices and the quanta image sensor,” in IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting (IEEE, 2014), pp. 10.1.1–10.1.4.

Hondongwa, D. B.

E. R. Fossum and D. B. Hondongwa, “A review of the pinned photodiode for CCD and CMOS image sensors,” IEEE J. Electron Devices Soc. 2, 33–43 (2014).
[Crossref]

Hseih, B. C.

S. G. Wuu, C. C. Wang, B. C. Hseih, Y. L. Tu, C. H. Tseng, T. H. Hsu, R. S. Hsiao, S. Takahashi, R. J. Lin, and C. S. Tsai, “A leading-edge 0.9  μm pixel CMOS image sensor technology with backside illumination: future challenges for pixel scaling,” in IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM) (IEEE, 2010), pp. 14.1.1–14.1.4.

Hsiao, R. S.

S. G. Wuu, C. C. Wang, B. C. Hseih, Y. L. Tu, C. H. Tseng, T. H. Hsu, R. S. Hsiao, S. Takahashi, R. J. Lin, and C. S. Tsai, “A leading-edge 0.9  μm pixel CMOS image sensor technology with backside illumination: future challenges for pixel scaling,” in IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM) (IEEE, 2010), pp. 14.1.1–14.1.4.

Hsu, T. H.

S. G. Wuu, C. C. Wang, B. C. Hseih, Y. L. Tu, C. H. Tseng, T. H. Hsu, R. S. Hsiao, S. Takahashi, R. J. Lin, and C. S. Tsai, “A leading-edge 0.9  μm pixel CMOS image sensor technology with backside illumination: future challenges for pixel scaling,” in IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM) (IEEE, 2010), pp. 14.1.1–14.1.4.

Hynecek, J.

J. Hynecek, “Impactron-a new solid state image intensifier,” IEEE Trans. Electron Devices 48, 2238–2241 (2001).
[Crossref]

Ishihara, Y.

N. Teranishi, A. Kohono, Y. Ishihara, E. Oda, and K. Arai, “No image lag photodiode structure in the interline CCD image sensor,” in International Electron Devices Meeting (IEEE, 1982), pp. 324–327.

Jones, T.

B. Pain, T. Cunningham, S. Nikzad, M. Hoenk, T. Jones, C. Wrigley, and B. Hancock, “A back-illuminated megapixel CMOS image sensor,” in IEEE Workshop on Charge-Coupled Devices and Advanced Image Sensors (NASA, 2005).

Jun, S.-W.

M.-W. Seo, T. Wang, S.-W. Jun, T. Akahori, and S. Kawahito, “A 0.44e−  rms read-noise 32  fps 0.5Mpixel high-sensitivity RG-less-pixel CMOS image sensor using bootstrapping reset,” in IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference (ISSCC) (IEEE, 2017), pp. 80–81.

Kagawa, K.

M.-W. Seo, S. Kawahito, K. Kagawa, and K. Yasutomi, “A 0.27e−  rms read noise 220-uV/e-conversion gain reset-gate-less CMOS image sensor with 0.11-μm CIS process,” IEEE Electron Device Lett. 36, 997–1000 (2015).
[Crossref]

Kawahito, S.

M.-W. Seo, S. Kawahito, K. Kagawa, and K. Yasutomi, “A 0.27e−  rms read noise 220-uV/e-conversion gain reset-gate-less CMOS image sensor with 0.11-μm CIS process,” IEEE Electron Device Lett. 36, 997–1000 (2015).
[Crossref]

M.-W. Seo, T. Wang, S.-W. Jun, T. Akahori, and S. Kawahito, “A 0.44e−  rms read-noise 32  fps 0.5Mpixel high-sensitivity RG-less-pixel CMOS image sensor using bootstrapping reset,” in IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference (ISSCC) (IEEE, 2017), pp. 80–81.

Kim, B.

J. Ahn, C.-R. Moon, B. Kim, K. Lee, Y. Kim, M. Lim, W. Lee, H. Park, K. Moon, and J. Yoo, “Advanced image sensor technology for pixel scaling down toward 1.0  μm,” in IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM) (IEEE, 2008), pp. 1–4.

Kim, Y.

J. Ahn, C.-R. Moon, B. Kim, K. Lee, Y. Kim, M. Lim, W. Lee, H. Park, K. Moon, and J. Yoo, “Advanced image sensor technology for pixel scaling down toward 1.0  μm,” in IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM) (IEEE, 2008), pp. 1–4.

Kohono, A.

N. Teranishi, A. Kohono, Y. Ishihara, E. Oda, and K. Arai, “No image lag photodiode structure in the interline CCD image sensor,” in International Electron Devices Meeting (IEEE, 1982), pp. 324–327.

Kosman, S.

C. Parks, S. Kosman, E. Nelson, N. Roberts, and S. Yaniga, “A 30  Fps 1920 × 1080 pixel electron multiplying CCD image sensor with per-pixel switchable gain,” in International Image Sensor Workshop (IISW), Vaals, The Netherlands, June8-11,2015, pp. 8–11.

Landers, D. J.

B. F. Aull, A. H. Loomis, D. J. Young, R. M. Heinrichs, B. J. Felton, P. J. Daniels, and D. J. Landers, “Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes for three-dimensional imaging,” Lincoln Lab. J. 13, 335–349 (2002).

Lee, K.

J. Ahn, C.-R. Moon, B. Kim, K. Lee, Y. Kim, M. Lim, W. Lee, H. Park, K. Moon, and J. Yoo, “Advanced image sensor technology for pixel scaling down toward 1.0  μm,” in IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM) (IEEE, 2008), pp. 1–4.

Lee, P. P.

R. M. Guidash and P. P. Lee, “Active pixel sensor with punch-through reset and cross-talk suppression,” U.S. patent5,872,371 A (February27, 1997).

Lee, W.

J. Ahn, C.-R. Moon, B. Kim, K. Lee, Y. Kim, M. Lim, W. Lee, H. Park, K. Moon, and J. Yoo, “Advanced image sensor technology for pixel scaling down toward 1.0  μm,” in IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM) (IEEE, 2008), pp. 1–4.

Lim, M.

J. Ahn, C.-R. Moon, B. Kim, K. Lee, Y. Kim, M. Lim, W. Lee, H. Park, K. Moon, and J. Yoo, “Advanced image sensor technology for pixel scaling down toward 1.0  μm,” in IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM) (IEEE, 2008), pp. 1–4.

Lin, R. J.

S. G. Wuu, C. C. Wang, B. C. Hseih, Y. L. Tu, C. H. Tseng, T. H. Hsu, R. S. Hsiao, S. Takahashi, R. J. Lin, and C. S. Tsai, “A leading-edge 0.9  μm pixel CMOS image sensor technology with backside illumination: future challenges for pixel scaling,” in IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM) (IEEE, 2010), pp. 14.1.1–14.1.4.

Loomis, A. H.

B. F. Aull, A. H. Loomis, D. J. Young, R. M. Heinrichs, B. J. Felton, P. J. Daniels, and D. J. Landers, “Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes for three-dimensional imaging,” Lincoln Lab. J. 13, 335–349 (2002).

Lu, Y. M.

S. H. Chan and Y. M. Lu, “Efficient image reconstruction for gigapixel quantum image sensors,” in IEEE Global Conference on Signal and Information Processing (GlobalSIP) (IEEE, 2014), pp. 312–316.

Ma, J.

J. Ma and E. R. Fossum, “Analytical modeling and TCAD simulation of a quanta image sensor jot device with a JFET source-follower for deep sub-electron read noise,” IEEE J. Electron Devices Soc. 5, 69–78 (2017).
[Crossref]

J. Ma, L. Anzagira, and E. R. Fossum, “A 1  μm-pitch quanta image sensor jot device with shared readout,” IEEE J. Electron Devices Soc. 4, 83–89 (2016).
[Crossref]

E. R. Fossum, J. Ma, S. Masoodian, L. Anzagira, and R. Zizza, “The quanta image sensor: every photon counts,” Sensors 16, 1260 (2016).
[Crossref]

S. Masoodian, A. Rao, J. Ma, K. Odame, and E. R. Fossum, “A 2.5  pJ/b binary image sensor as a pathfinder for quanta image sensors,” IEEE Trans. Electron Devices 63, 100–105 (2016).
[Crossref]

J. Ma, D. Starkey, A. Rao, K. Odame, and E. R. Fossum, “Characterization of quanta image sensor pump-gate jots with deep sub-electron read noise,” IEEE J. Electron Devices Soc. 3, 472–480 (2015).
[Crossref]

J. Ma and E. R. Fossum, “Quanta image sensor jot with sub 0.3e−  r.m.s. read noise and photon counting capability,” IEEE Electron Device Lett. 36, 926–928 (2015).
[Crossref]

J. Ma and E. R. Fossum, “A pump-gate jot device with high conversion gain for a quanta image sensor,” IEEE J. Electron Devices Soc. 3, 73–77 (2015).
[Crossref]

J. Ma, D. Hondongwa, and E. R. Fossum, “Jot devices and the quanta image sensor,” in IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting (IEEE, 2014), pp. 10.1.1–10.1.4.

E. R. Fossum and J. Ma, “Gateless reset for image sensor pixels,” U.S. patentProv. App. 62/128, 983 (May3, 2015).

Masoodian, S.

E. R. Fossum, J. Ma, S. Masoodian, L. Anzagira, and R. Zizza, “The quanta image sensor: every photon counts,” Sensors 16, 1260 (2016).
[Crossref]

S. Masoodian, A. Rao, J. Ma, K. Odame, and E. R. Fossum, “A 2.5  pJ/b binary image sensor as a pathfinder for quanta image sensors,” IEEE Trans. Electron Devices 63, 100–105 (2016).
[Crossref]

S. Masoodian, K. Odame, and E. R. Fossum, “Low-power readout circuit for quanta image sensors,” Electron. Lett. 50, 589–591 (2014).
[Crossref]

Moon, C.-R.

J. Ahn, C.-R. Moon, B. Kim, K. Lee, Y. Kim, M. Lim, W. Lee, H. Park, K. Moon, and J. Yoo, “Advanced image sensor technology for pixel scaling down toward 1.0  μm,” in IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM) (IEEE, 2008), pp. 1–4.

Moon, K.

J. Ahn, C.-R. Moon, B. Kim, K. Lee, Y. Kim, M. Lim, W. Lee, H. Park, K. Moon, and J. Yoo, “Advanced image sensor technology for pixel scaling down toward 1.0  μm,” in IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM) (IEEE, 2008), pp. 1–4.

Nelson, E.

C. Parks, S. Kosman, E. Nelson, N. Roberts, and S. Yaniga, “A 30  Fps 1920 × 1080 pixel electron multiplying CCD image sensor with per-pixel switchable gain,” in International Image Sensor Workshop (IISW), Vaals, The Netherlands, June8-11,2015, pp. 8–11.

Nikzad, S.

B. Pain, T. Cunningham, S. Nikzad, M. Hoenk, T. Jones, C. Wrigley, and B. Hancock, “A back-illuminated megapixel CMOS image sensor,” in IEEE Workshop on Charge-Coupled Devices and Advanced Image Sensors (NASA, 2005).

Oda, E.

N. Teranishi, A. Kohono, Y. Ishihara, E. Oda, and K. Arai, “No image lag photodiode structure in the interline CCD image sensor,” in International Electron Devices Meeting (IEEE, 1982), pp. 324–327.

Odame, K.

S. Masoodian, A. Rao, J. Ma, K. Odame, and E. R. Fossum, “A 2.5  pJ/b binary image sensor as a pathfinder for quanta image sensors,” IEEE Trans. Electron Devices 63, 100–105 (2016).
[Crossref]

J. Ma, D. Starkey, A. Rao, K. Odame, and E. R. Fossum, “Characterization of quanta image sensor pump-gate jots with deep sub-electron read noise,” IEEE J. Electron Devices Soc. 3, 472–480 (2015).
[Crossref]

S. Masoodian, K. Odame, and E. R. Fossum, “Low-power readout circuit for quanta image sensors,” Electron. Lett. 50, 589–591 (2014).
[Crossref]

Pain, B.

B. Pain, T. Cunningham, S. Nikzad, M. Hoenk, T. Jones, C. Wrigley, and B. Hancock, “A back-illuminated megapixel CMOS image sensor,” in IEEE Workshop on Charge-Coupled Devices and Advanced Image Sensors (NASA, 2005).

Park, H.

J. Ahn, C.-R. Moon, B. Kim, K. Lee, Y. Kim, M. Lim, W. Lee, H. Park, K. Moon, and J. Yoo, “Advanced image sensor technology for pixel scaling down toward 1.0  μm,” in IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM) (IEEE, 2008), pp. 1–4.

Parks, C.

C. Parks, S. Kosman, E. Nelson, N. Roberts, and S. Yaniga, “A 30  Fps 1920 × 1080 pixel electron multiplying CCD image sensor with per-pixel switchable gain,” in International Image Sensor Workshop (IISW), Vaals, The Netherlands, June8-11,2015, pp. 8–11.

Parmesan, L.

N. A. W. Dutton, I. Gyongy, L. Parmesan, and R. K. Henderson, “Single photon counting performance and noise analysis of CMOS SPAD-based image sensors,” Sensors 16, 1122 (2016).
[Crossref]

N. A. W. Dutton, L. Parmesan, A. J. Holmes, L. A. Grant, and R. K. Henderson, “320 × 240 oversampled digital single photon counting image sensor,” in Symposium on VLSI Circuits Digest of Technical Papers (IEEE, 2014), pp. 1–2.

Rao, A.

S. Masoodian, A. Rao, J. Ma, K. Odame, and E. R. Fossum, “A 2.5  pJ/b binary image sensor as a pathfinder for quanta image sensors,” IEEE Trans. Electron Devices 63, 100–105 (2016).
[Crossref]

J. Ma, D. Starkey, A. Rao, K. Odame, and E. R. Fossum, “Characterization of quanta image sensor pump-gate jots with deep sub-electron read noise,” IEEE J. Electron Devices Soc. 3, 472–480 (2015).
[Crossref]

Richardson, J. A.

J. A. Richardson, L. A. Grant, and R. K. Henderson, “Low dark count single-photon avalanche diode structure compatible with standard nanometer scale CMOS technology,” IEEE Photon. Technol. Lett. 21, 1020–1022 (2009).
[Crossref]

Robbins, M. S.

M. S. Robbins and B. J. Hadwen, “The noise performance of electron multiplying charge-coupled devices,” IEEE Trans. Electron Devices 50, 1227–1232 (2003).
[Crossref]

Roberts, N.

C. Parks, S. Kosman, E. Nelson, N. Roberts, and S. Yaniga, “A 30  Fps 1920 × 1080 pixel electron multiplying CCD image sensor with per-pixel switchable gain,” in International Image Sensor Workshop (IISW), Vaals, The Netherlands, June8-11,2015, pp. 8–11.

Seo, M.-W.

M.-W. Seo, S. Kawahito, K. Kagawa, and K. Yasutomi, “A 0.27e−  rms read noise 220-uV/e-conversion gain reset-gate-less CMOS image sensor with 0.11-μm CIS process,” IEEE Electron Device Lett. 36, 997–1000 (2015).
[Crossref]

M.-W. Seo, T. Wang, S.-W. Jun, T. Akahori, and S. Kawahito, “A 0.44e−  rms read-noise 32  fps 0.5Mpixel high-sensitivity RG-less-pixel CMOS image sensor using bootstrapping reset,” in IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference (ISSCC) (IEEE, 2017), pp. 80–81.

Starkey, D.

J. Ma, D. Starkey, A. Rao, K. Odame, and E. R. Fossum, “Characterization of quanta image sensor pump-gate jots with deep sub-electron read noise,” IEEE J. Electron Devices Soc. 3, 472–480 (2015).
[Crossref]

Starkey, D. A.

D. A. Starkey and E. R. Fossum, “Determining conversion gain and read noise using a photon-counting histogram method for deep sub-electron read noise image sensors,” IEEE J. Electron Devices Soc. 4, 129–135 (2016).
[Crossref]

Sze, S. M.

S. M. Sze, Semiconductor Sensors (Wiley, 1994), Vol. 55.

Takahashi, S.

S. G. Wuu, C. C. Wang, B. C. Hseih, Y. L. Tu, C. H. Tseng, T. H. Hsu, R. S. Hsiao, S. Takahashi, R. J. Lin, and C. S. Tsai, “A leading-edge 0.9  μm pixel CMOS image sensor technology with backside illumination: future challenges for pixel scaling,” in IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM) (IEEE, 2010), pp. 14.1.1–14.1.4.

Teranishi, N.

N. Teranishi, “Effect and limitation of pinned photodiode,” IEEE Trans. Electron Devices 63, 10–15 (2016).
[Crossref]

N. Teranishi, “Required conditions for photon-counting image sensors,” IEEE Trans. Electron Devices 59, 2199–2205 (2012).
[Crossref]

N. Teranishi, A. Kohono, Y. Ishihara, E. Oda, and K. Arai, “No image lag photodiode structure in the interline CCD image sensor,” in International Electron Devices Meeting (IEEE, 1982), pp. 324–327.

Tsai, C. S.

S. G. Wuu, C. C. Wang, B. C. Hseih, Y. L. Tu, C. H. Tseng, T. H. Hsu, R. S. Hsiao, S. Takahashi, R. J. Lin, and C. S. Tsai, “A leading-edge 0.9  μm pixel CMOS image sensor technology with backside illumination: future challenges for pixel scaling,” in IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM) (IEEE, 2010), pp. 14.1.1–14.1.4.

Tseng, C. H.

S. G. Wuu, C. C. Wang, B. C. Hseih, Y. L. Tu, C. H. Tseng, T. H. Hsu, R. S. Hsiao, S. Takahashi, R. J. Lin, and C. S. Tsai, “A leading-edge 0.9  μm pixel CMOS image sensor technology with backside illumination: future challenges for pixel scaling,” in IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM) (IEEE, 2010), pp. 14.1.1–14.1.4.

Tu, Y. L.

S. G. Wuu, C. C. Wang, B. C. Hseih, Y. L. Tu, C. H. Tseng, T. H. Hsu, R. S. Hsiao, S. Takahashi, R. J. Lin, and C. S. Tsai, “A leading-edge 0.9  μm pixel CMOS image sensor technology with backside illumination: future challenges for pixel scaling,” in IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM) (IEEE, 2010), pp. 14.1.1–14.1.4.

Wang, C. C.

S. G. Wuu, C. C. Wang, B. C. Hseih, Y. L. Tu, C. H. Tseng, T. H. Hsu, R. S. Hsiao, S. Takahashi, R. J. Lin, and C. S. Tsai, “A leading-edge 0.9  μm pixel CMOS image sensor technology with backside illumination: future challenges for pixel scaling,” in IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM) (IEEE, 2010), pp. 14.1.1–14.1.4.

Wang, T.

M.-W. Seo, T. Wang, S.-W. Jun, T. Akahori, and S. Kawahito, “A 0.44e−  rms read-noise 32  fps 0.5Mpixel high-sensitivity RG-less-pixel CMOS image sensor using bootstrapping reset,” in IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference (ISSCC) (IEEE, 2017), pp. 80–81.

Wang, X.

S. H. Chan, O. A. Elgendy, and X. Wang, “Images from bits: non-iterative image reconstruction for quanta image sensors,” Sensors 16, 1961 (2016).
[Crossref]

Wrigley, C.

B. Pain, T. Cunningham, S. Nikzad, M. Hoenk, T. Jones, C. Wrigley, and B. Hancock, “A back-illuminated megapixel CMOS image sensor,” in IEEE Workshop on Charge-Coupled Devices and Advanced Image Sensors (NASA, 2005).

Wuu, S. G.

S. G. Wuu, C. C. Wang, B. C. Hseih, Y. L. Tu, C. H. Tseng, T. H. Hsu, R. S. Hsiao, S. Takahashi, R. J. Lin, and C. S. Tsai, “A leading-edge 0.9  μm pixel CMOS image sensor technology with backside illumination: future challenges for pixel scaling,” in IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM) (IEEE, 2010), pp. 14.1.1–14.1.4.

Yaniga, S.

C. Parks, S. Kosman, E. Nelson, N. Roberts, and S. Yaniga, “A 30  Fps 1920 × 1080 pixel electron multiplying CCD image sensor with per-pixel switchable gain,” in International Image Sensor Workshop (IISW), Vaals, The Netherlands, June8-11,2015, pp. 8–11.

Yasutomi, K.

M.-W. Seo, S. Kawahito, K. Kagawa, and K. Yasutomi, “A 0.27e−  rms read noise 220-uV/e-conversion gain reset-gate-less CMOS image sensor with 0.11-μm CIS process,” IEEE Electron Device Lett. 36, 997–1000 (2015).
[Crossref]

Yoo, J.

J. Ahn, C.-R. Moon, B. Kim, K. Lee, Y. Kim, M. Lim, W. Lee, H. Park, K. Moon, and J. Yoo, “Advanced image sensor technology for pixel scaling down toward 1.0  μm,” in IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM) (IEEE, 2008), pp. 1–4.

Young, D. J.

B. F. Aull, A. H. Loomis, D. J. Young, R. M. Heinrichs, B. J. Felton, P. J. Daniels, and D. J. Landers, “Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes for three-dimensional imaging,” Lincoln Lab. J. 13, 335–349 (2002).

Zizza, R.

E. R. Fossum, J. Ma, S. Masoodian, L. Anzagira, and R. Zizza, “The quanta image sensor: every photon counts,” Sensors 16, 1260 (2016).
[Crossref]

Electron. Lett. (1)

S. Masoodian, K. Odame, and E. R. Fossum, “Low-power readout circuit for quanta image sensors,” Electron. Lett. 50, 589–591 (2014).
[Crossref]

IEEE Electron Device Lett. (2)

J. Ma and E. R. Fossum, “Quanta image sensor jot with sub 0.3e−  r.m.s. read noise and photon counting capability,” IEEE Electron Device Lett. 36, 926–928 (2015).
[Crossref]

M.-W. Seo, S. Kawahito, K. Kagawa, and K. Yasutomi, “A 0.27e−  rms read noise 220-uV/e-conversion gain reset-gate-less CMOS image sensor with 0.11-μm CIS process,” IEEE Electron Device Lett. 36, 997–1000 (2015).
[Crossref]

IEEE J. Electron Devices Soc. (8)

D. A. Starkey and E. R. Fossum, “Determining conversion gain and read noise using a photon-counting histogram method for deep sub-electron read noise image sensors,” IEEE J. Electron Devices Soc. 4, 129–135 (2016).
[Crossref]

J. Ma, D. Starkey, A. Rao, K. Odame, and E. R. Fossum, “Characterization of quanta image sensor pump-gate jots with deep sub-electron read noise,” IEEE J. Electron Devices Soc. 3, 472–480 (2015).
[Crossref]

J. Ma, L. Anzagira, and E. R. Fossum, “A 1  μm-pitch quanta image sensor jot device with shared readout,” IEEE J. Electron Devices Soc. 4, 83–89 (2016).
[Crossref]

J. Ma and E. R. Fossum, “A pump-gate jot device with high conversion gain for a quanta image sensor,” IEEE J. Electron Devices Soc. 3, 73–77 (2015).
[Crossref]

J. Ma and E. R. Fossum, “Analytical modeling and TCAD simulation of a quanta image sensor jot device with a JFET source-follower for deep sub-electron read noise,” IEEE J. Electron Devices Soc. 5, 69–78 (2017).
[Crossref]

E. R. Fossum and D. B. Hondongwa, “A review of the pinned photodiode for CCD and CMOS image sensors,” IEEE J. Electron Devices Soc. 2, 33–43 (2014).
[Crossref]

E. R. Fossum, “Modeling the performance of single-bit and multi-bit quanta image sensors,” IEEE J. Electron Devices Soc. 1, 166–174 (2013).
[Crossref]

E. R. Fossum, “Photon counting error rates in single-bit and multi-bit quanta image sensors,” IEEE J. Electron Devices Soc. 4, 136–143 (2016).
[Crossref]

IEEE Photon. Technol. Lett. (1)

J. A. Richardson, L. A. Grant, and R. K. Henderson, “Low dark count single-photon avalanche diode structure compatible with standard nanometer scale CMOS technology,” IEEE Photon. Technol. Lett. 21, 1020–1022 (2009).
[Crossref]

IEEE Trans. Electron Devices (5)

J. Hynecek, “Impactron-a new solid state image intensifier,” IEEE Trans. Electron Devices 48, 2238–2241 (2001).
[Crossref]

N. Teranishi, “Required conditions for photon-counting image sensors,” IEEE Trans. Electron Devices 59, 2199–2205 (2012).
[Crossref]

M. S. Robbins and B. J. Hadwen, “The noise performance of electron multiplying charge-coupled devices,” IEEE Trans. Electron Devices 50, 1227–1232 (2003).
[Crossref]

S. Masoodian, A. Rao, J. Ma, K. Odame, and E. R. Fossum, “A 2.5  pJ/b binary image sensor as a pathfinder for quanta image sensors,” IEEE Trans. Electron Devices 63, 100–105 (2016).
[Crossref]

N. Teranishi, “Effect and limitation of pinned photodiode,” IEEE Trans. Electron Devices 63, 10–15 (2016).
[Crossref]

IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. (1)

D. M. Fleetwood, “1/f noise and defects in microelectronic materials and devices,” IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. 62, 1462–1486 (2015).
[Crossref]

J. Phys. D (1)

E. Charbon, “Towards large scale CMOS single-photon detector arrays for lab-on-chip applications,” J. Phys. D 41, 094010 (2008).
[Crossref]

Lincoln Lab. J. (1)

B. F. Aull, A. H. Loomis, D. J. Young, R. M. Heinrichs, B. J. Felton, P. J. Daniels, and D. J. Landers, “Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes for three-dimensional imaging,” Lincoln Lab. J. 13, 335–349 (2002).

Sensors (3)

N. A. W. Dutton, I. Gyongy, L. Parmesan, and R. K. Henderson, “Single photon counting performance and noise analysis of CMOS SPAD-based image sensors,” Sensors 16, 1122 (2016).
[Crossref]

E. R. Fossum, J. Ma, S. Masoodian, L. Anzagira, and R. Zizza, “The quanta image sensor: every photon counts,” Sensors 16, 1260 (2016).
[Crossref]

S. H. Chan, O. A. Elgendy, and X. Wang, “Images from bits: non-iterative image reconstruction for quanta image sensors,” Sensors 16, 1961 (2016).
[Crossref]

Other (17)

N. Teranishi, A. Kohono, Y. Ishihara, E. Oda, and K. Arai, “No image lag photodiode structure in the interline CCD image sensor,” in International Electron Devices Meeting (IEEE, 1982), pp. 324–327.

E. R. Fossum, “Image sensor using single photon jots and processor to create pixels,” U.S. patent8,648,287 B1 (May26, 2006).

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Figures (9)

Fig. 1.
Fig. 1. Theoretical modeling of photoelectron counting. (a) Probability distribution of the photoelectron voltage signal corrupted with read noise. (b) Illustration of counting error during thresholding to binary output in single-bit QIS. (c) The bit error rate (BER) in single-bit QIS as a function of read noise and quanta exposure H.
Fig. 2.
Fig. 2. Introduction of the technologies used for read noise reduction. (a) Schematic of two-way shared readout pump-gate jots with conventional reset mechanism or punch-through reset. (b) Simplified layout of a pump-gate jot with punch-through reset. (c) Cross-section doping profile of the pump-gate jot from 3D TCAD simulation.
Fig. 3.
Fig. 3. Illustrations of the architecture of the QIS prototype chip. (a) Simplified architecture of one 1Mjot array with high-speed single-bit digital outputs. (b) Schematic of one digital cluster. (c) Simplified architecture of one 1Mjot array with analog output. (d) Schematic of one analog cluster.
Fig. 4.
Fig. 4. Experimental demonstration of photoelectron counting. Photon-counting histograms of one single PTR jot under four different illumination levels (H). Read noise of 0.17erms is shown from the VPM. 20,000 readouts were used to create each PCH.
Fig. 5.
Fig. 5. Histograms of (a) read noise and (b) conversion gain of the TPG and PTR jots.
Fig. 6.
Fig. 6. (a) Scatter plot of the voltage-referred read noise versus conversion gain of TPG and PTR jots. (b) Plot of the bit density versus the quanta exposure H. The experimental data from a group of 16k jots and one single jot are compared with the theoretical model with different read noise.
Fig. 7.
Fig. 7. Dark-current-related results from experiments and simulations. (a) Probability density distribution of the dark current rate for 16k TPG jots at room temperature (23°C) and 60°C. (b) Simulated 3D potential profile of a TPG jot during the integration period. (c) PCH of thermally generated electrons in darkness for 256×64 TPG jots. The quantization of dark electrons can be observed.
Fig. 8.
Fig. 8. (a) Experimental and simulated quantum efficiency results for the visible wavelength range. (b) Simulated distribution of incident photons going into a TPG jot.
Fig. 9.
Fig. 9. Illustration of the image-formation process with the sample image from the 1Mjot QIS prototype chip operating at 1040 fps. (a) Magnified area in one field of binary single-photon data (1024×1024) grabbed from the 1Mjot QIS. (b) Same area in the binary field data with lower magnification. (c) Raw binary QIS output images, including eight continuous frames. (d) Gray-scale image processed with 8×8×8 jot cubicles using Purdue de-noising algorithm [39,40] for 128×128 resolution.

Tables (1)

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Table 1. Characterization Results of the Prototype 1Mjot QIS

Equations (2)

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V=QeCFD,
P(U)=k=0{12πun2p[(Uk)22un2]eHHkk!},

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