Abstract

An imaging Mueller matrix polarimeter, named the red–green–blue (RGB)950, takes images of medium-sized (tens of centimeters) objects by using a very bright source, large polarization state generator, and high-quality camera. Its broadband extended light source switches between red, green, blue, and near-infrared light to allow taking polarimetric images for comparison with RGB camera images. The large diffuse source makes shadow transitions gradual and spreads out the specular reflected spot into a larger less conspicuous area.

© 2019 Optical Society of America

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Supplementary Material (9)

NameDescription
Visualization 1       Mueller matrix of a rotating ceramic jug using light with a wavelength of 662 nm.
Visualization 2       Reflectance of a rotating ceramic jug using light with a wavelength of 662 nm.
Visualization 3       Depolarization index of a rotating ceramic jug using light with a wavelength of 662 nm.
Visualization 4       Total retardance of a rotating ceramic jug using light with a wavelength of 662 nm.
Visualization 5       Retardance orientation of a rotating ceramic jug using light with a wavelength of 662 nm.
Visualization 6       Total diattenuation of a rotating ceramic jug using light with a wavelength of 662 nm.
Visualization 7       Diattenuation orientation of a rotating ceramic jug using light with a wavelength of 662 nm.
Visualization 8       Total polarizance of a rotating ceramic jug using light with a wavelength of 662 nm.
Visualization 9       Polarizance orientation of a rotating ceramic jug using light with a wavelength of 662 nm.

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Figures (5)

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Tables (3)

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Equations (4)

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Metrics