Abstract

Conventional thermal poling methods require direct physical contact to internal fiber electrodes. Here, we report an indirect electrostatic induction technique using electrically floating wires inside the fiber combined with external electric fields that can allow for facile poling of complex microstructured fibers (MOFs) of arbitrarily long lengths. In combination with our unique ability to use liquid gallium electrodes, inducing second-order nonlinearities inside otherwise difficult to access multi-core or multi-hole MOFs now becomes entirely feasible and practical. The formation of a permanent second-order nonlinearity is unequivocally demonstrated by realizing quasi-phase-matched frequency doublers using periodic UV erasure methods in the induction-poled fibers. The second-order susceptibility created inside the fiber is driven by the potential difference established between the floating electrodes, which we calculate via numerical simulations.

© 2014 Optical Society of America

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