Abstract

We have fabricated a single hologram with which to determine the spherical refractive error of the human eye in the range 5 to -2.5 diopters (D) with an accuracy of ±0.25 D in a single step. The amplitude of accommodation is determined at the same time. The hologram is a record of 16 targets, each of which has a different image vergence in the range 5 to -2.5 D in steps of 0.5 D. This idea can be applied readily to any dioptric range. The measurement method is simple, fast, and reliable.

© 2003 Optical Society of America

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References

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  1. W. J. Benjamin, Borish’s Clinical Refraction (Saunders, Philadelphia, Pa., 1998).
  2. P. Hariharan, Optical Holography (Cambridge U. Press, Cambridge, 1984).

Benjamin, W. J.

W. J. Benjamin, Borish’s Clinical Refraction (Saunders, Philadelphia, Pa., 1998).

Hariharan, P.

P. Hariharan, Optical Holography (Cambridge U. Press, Cambridge, 1984).

Other (2)

W. J. Benjamin, Borish’s Clinical Refraction (Saunders, Philadelphia, Pa., 1998).

P. Hariharan, Optical Holography (Cambridge U. Press, Cambridge, 1984).

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Figures (4)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

The three-dimensional target.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

Experimental arrangement used to record the hologram.

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

Recording geometry. (b) Reconstruction geometry.

Fig. 4
Fig. 4

Simulation of the view through the hologram for (a) an emmetropic eye, (b) a myopic eye, and (c) a hypermetropic eye, all with small accommodation ranges.

Tables (1)

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Table 1 Object Distances u and Corresponding Image Vergences for a 20-D Lens

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