Abstract

A frequency-modulated continuous-wave technique is used to detect the presence of frequency shifts in the Rayleigh-backscattered light in a single-mode optical fiber as a result of a changing temperature. The system is able to detect a rate of temperature change of 0.014 K/s, when a 20-cm length of fiber is heated. The system is also able to demonstrate a spatial resolution of better than 15 cm.

© 1994 Optical Society of America

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References

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  1. X. Bao, D. J. Webb, D. A. Jackson, Opt. Lett. 18, 552 (1993).
    [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  2. R. I. MacDonald, Appl. Opt. 20, 1840 (1981).
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  3. R. Juškaitis, A. M. Mamedov, V. T. Potapov, S. V. Shatalin, Opt. Lett. 17, 1623 (1992).
    [CrossRef]
  4. D. A. Jackson, J. Phys. E 18, 981 (1985).
    [CrossRef]

1993

1992

1985

D. A. Jackson, J. Phys. E 18, 981 (1985).
[CrossRef]

1981

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Figures (4)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Schematic showing the frequency-modulated continuous-wave distributed sensor setup.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

Comparison of the rate of change of temperature with time and the frequency shift with time for the 5.1-cm heating element.

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

Plot of the rate of temperature change versus the Doppler frequency shift for the 5.1-cm heating element.

Fig. 4
Fig. 4

Plot showing frequency peaks in the detected signal. Peaks above 30 Hz suffer frequency shifts as a result of the temperature change occurring 1.24 m from the silvered fiber end.

Equations (3)

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ϕ = 2 π 2 x n f l c ,
f b = 1 2 π d ϕ d t = 2 x n c d f l d t = 2 x n c f p f r ,
δ f = 2 2 π d ϕ L d t = 100 L π d θ d t ,

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