Abstract

An acute-angle retroreflector having three dihedral angles of 45, 60, and 90 deg was studied by use of the ray-trace method. Incident rays are reflected nine times in the retroreflector, and there are 26 different sequences for reflections. Errors in the dihedral angles will cause the directions of the reflected rays to diverge. A possible application of the acute-angle retroreflector is in target design for laser ranging.

© 1994 Optical Society of America

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References

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  1. D. A. Thomas, J. C. Wyant, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 67, 467 (1977).
    [CrossRef]
  2. A. Minato, N. Sugimoto, Y. Sasano, Appl. Opt. 31, 6015 (1992).
    [CrossRef] [PubMed]

1992 (1)

1977 (1)

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Figures (4)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Shapes that work as retroreflectors and their mirror images. Two types of the acute-angle retroreflector are indicated by the letters a and b.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

Acute-angle retroreflectors. There are two symmetrical types.

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

Acute-angle retroreflector viewed from the direction of ( x 1 + x 2 + x 3 ) / 3. The aperture can be divided into 26 domains based on the sequence for reflections.

Fig. 4
Fig. 4

Direction of the reflected rays when dihedral angle errors are introduced. An error of +0.01 deg is added to (a) θ1, (b) θ2, (c) θ3, (d) θ1, θ2, and θ3.

Tables (1)

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Table 1 Order of Reflections in the Acute-Angle Retroreflector

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