Abstract

A novel scheme for making absolute wavelength measurements with a grating spectrograph is proposed. A grating with special multiple rulings is illuminated with a reference laser of known wavelength to project a ruler-like diffraction pattern of equidistant wavelength calibration lines directly onto the unknown spectrum.

© 1977 Optical Society of America

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References

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  1. S. P. Davis, Diffraction Grating Spectrographs (Holt, Rinehart and Winston, New York, 1970).
  2. F. V. Kowalski, R. T. Hawkins, A. L. Schawlow, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 66, 965 (1976).
    [CrossRef]
  3. T. W. Hänsen, Appl. Opt. 11, 895 (1972).
    [CrossRef]

1976

1972

Appl. Opt.

J. Opt. Soc. Am.

Other

S. P. Davis, Diffraction Grating Spectrographs (Holt, Rinehart and Winston, New York, 1970).

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Figures (2)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Spectrograph with self-calibrating grating.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

Hg emission line at 5460.74 Å on a wavelength marker scale, produced with a self-calibrating grating in a 2-m spectrograph. A red He–Ne laser was the reference source. The spectrum was directly recorded on Polaroid film [Fig. 2(A)] or photographed through a magnifying glass [Fig. 2(B)]. The coarser marker lines at every tenth position appear displaced downward in Fig. 2(B) because of diffraction at a horizontal edge mask in front of the grating.

Equations (3)

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sin ( ϕ ) = sin ( ϕ 0 ) + n λ / d .
sin ( ϕ m ) = sin ( ϕ 0 ) + m λ R / D .
m = ( n D / d λ R ) λ .

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