Abstract

We report experiments with subpicosecond UV laser filaments for the remote analysis of samples related to objects of cultural heritage. The classic laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique finds new avenues through femtosecond filamentation, and dynamic remote LIBS becomes possible. Advantages such as self-regulated laser intensity deposition on the target suggest that there is significant potential for using UV femtosecond filaments for the remote analysis of sculpture and large monuments.

© 2006 Optical Society of America

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