Abstract

Laser spectral compression by a factor of 102.8 is experimentally achieved through optical soliton propagation in a dispersion-increasing fiber. By varying the input pulse energy, the wavelength tuning range of the compressed spectral peak could exceed 115 nm. Spectrally compressed spectrum with two bright peaks is demonstrated for the first time, to our knowledge. The structure of the dual-peaked compressed spectra is adjustable through the interplay of initial pulse chirp and energy. All of the experimental data are compared to numerical results and are found in good agreement.

© 2017 Optical Society of America

1. Introduction

Broadband coherent optical sources such as femtosecond lasers and optical supercontinua are essential tools for applications such as spectroscopy, nonlinear microscopy, and frequency metrology. However, since the optical power is simultaneously distributed over a broad optical bandwidth, these sources often suffer from low spectral power density (spectral brightness). Such characteristic could hinder the signal to noise ratio and thus reduces the data acquisition rate in the aforementioned applications. One exciting solution, known as spectral compression, is to redistribute the optical source power from the entire bandwidth into a narrow user-desired spectral window. Such possibility was first observed in an optical fiber as early as 1978 [1], however the physical explanation was not provided until 1991 [2]. As compared to linear optical filtering, the spectral compression process is ideally lossless, and provides a direct means in achieving spectral brightness enhancement. The spectral compression ratio (SCR) is typically defined by the ratio of the input to the output full-width half-maximum (FWHM) spectral bandwidths. A higher spectral brightness enhancement is enabled through a larger SCR.

Spectral compression has received increasing research attentions recently, and various works have been experimentally performed in both the classical and non-classical optical regimes [3–5]. The approaches for achieving spectral compression of classical light can typically be categorized into two groups: optical frequency up-conversion processes involving second-order nonlinearities [6,7] and ultrafast pulse propagation in optical fibers involving third-order nonlinearities [8–18]. In recent years, laser spectral compressions have been demonstrated using optical gain fibers [8,9], photonic crystal fibers [10–13], and comb-profile fibers [14,15]. The comb-profile fibers were able to generate compressed spectra with very low pedestal energy.

We recently demonstrated spectral compression using soliton propagation in a dispersion-increasing fiber (DIF) [16]. In a DIF, the dispersion coefficient is gradually increased from the input value Din to the output value Dout during the fiber drawing/coiling process. The working principle is the reverse operation of the well-known soliton temporal compression in a dispersion-decreasing fiber. We further showed the maximum SCR obtainable in a DIF would not be limited by the dispersion ratio of the fiber, i.e., ηDIF = Dout/Din. A high SCR of 28.6 using a DIF was obtained [17].

In practical applications, spectrally bright optical sources with tunable peak wavelength would be beneficial. On the other hand, if the compressed spectra could be structured, i.e., having various bright spectral peaks, such unique feature could facilitate spectroscopic applications where multiple frequencies are to be measured simultaneously. However, in all of the past works, laser spectral compressions have been limited in the generation of a single spectrally compressed peak. In this report, 69 fs nearly transform-limited pulse is experimentally launched into a DIF to achieve a record high SCR of 102.8. This is a dramatic improvement as compared prior reports in optical fibers with typical SCR values below 28 [1–4,7–9,11–16,18]. Secondly, through increasing the input pulse energy, we show the spectrally compressed peak wavelength is tunable from 1578.5 nm to 1695 nm. The wavelength tuning range is current limited only due to our measurement equipment. Such wideband tuning capability during the spectral compression process was not demonstrated. We note in refs [14,15], the wavelength tuning was achieved by changing the input laser wavelength. Finally, spectrally compressed output with two simultaneous bright peaks are generated for the first time to our best knowledge. Moreover, we demonstrate the structure of the dual-peaked spectra, for example, the relative amplitudes and wavelength separation, are adjustable through the interplay of input pulse chirp and energy. Our experimental data are compared to numerical calculations and are all found in excellent agreements.

2. Result and discussion

2.1 Experimental setup

Figure 1(a) shows the schematics of our experimental setup. The optical source is an fs Er-doped passively mode-locked fiber laser with 80 MHz repetition-frequency and maximum average output power of 100 mW (Menlo Systems, T-Light). An optical collimator is used to couple the free-spaced laser output into the standard single-mode fiber (SMF). A variable optical attenuator (V-ATT) is used to enable input pulse energy control. A segment of dispersion-compensating fiber (DCF, by OFS) is connected after the attenuator. By pairing different (SMF, DCF) lengths, we are able to adjust the input pulse chirp launched into the DIF. An optical power meter (PM) is connected to the ten percent port of a 90/10 optical coupler (OC) for power monitoring. The ninety percent port of the optical coupler is connected to the DIF (FORC, Moscow) for spectral compression. The DIF employed in this work is 1 km in length, and the dispersion coefficients increase linearly from the input end (0.6 ps/nm/km) to the output end (13.5 ps/nm/km). The two ends of the DIF are spliced with two standard single-mode fiber adapters. The splicing losses are 1.8 dB (SP1) and 1.2 dB (SP2), respectively. The optical spectra are measured using an optical spectrum analyzer (OSA, Yokogawa AQ6370C). The input spectrum into the DIF is measured before SP1 using the OSA, and the input pulse duration is measured using a home-built intensity auto-correlator (IA).

 figure: Fig. 1

Fig. 1 (a) Schematics of the experimental setup. SMF: single-mode fiber; V-ATT: variable optical attenuator; DCF: dispersion-compensating fiber; OC: optical coupler; PM: power meter; DIF: dispersion-increasing fiber; SP: splicing point; OSA: optical spectrum analyzer; IA: intensity auto-correlator. The dispersion ramp for the DIF is also plotted. (b) Fs laser initial spectrum. (c) Intensity auto-correlation traces of the fs fiber laser and the sech fitting of same FWHM duration.

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The fiber laser initial spectrum measured before the DIF is displayed in Fig. 1(b). The spectrum is centered at 1560.3 nm, with a FWHM bandwidth of 82.2 nm. Such spectrum is capable of providing an optical pulse with 62 fs transform-limited duration. Our previous study showed a nearly transform-limited input pulse is beneficial in achieving a SCR beyond the fiber dispersion ratio [17]. Therefore, the laser pulse duration launched into the DIF is minimized followed by serial SMF length cutbacks with in situ intensity auto-correlation measurements to ensure nearly transform-limited input pulse is delivered into the DIF. The resulting (SMF, DCF) lengths are (303, 50) cm, respectively. In our experimental setup, we ensured the SMF link length to the IA is identical to that connecting to the DIF. The nearly transform-limited input pulse intensity auto-correlation trace is displayed in Fig. 1(c), highly resembling an ideal sech pulse with a 69 fs de-convoluted FWHM duration.

2.2 Single-peak spectral compression

The nearly transform-limited pulse is launched into the DIF. Figure 2(a) shows the experimental spectrally compressed optical spectrum (blue solid trace) after the DIF. A maximum SCR is obtained by adjusting the variable optical attenuator [17]. Experimentally, such SCR value is ensured by real-time monitoring the resulting spectrally compressed peak reaching a minimum FWHM width on the OSA. With an average input power of 1.57 mW, the compressed peak spectral FWHM width is 0.8 nm. This results in a record high SCR of 102.8 achieved in an optical fiber. The laser initial optical spectrum shown in Fig. 1(b) and the corresponding power value are inserted into our numerical calculations. Our numerical analyses are performed by solving the generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation using the split-step Fourier method with 3000 computational steps. In addition to the linear dispersion ramp values, fiber loss, nonlinear coefficient and Raman constant of 0.4 dB/km, 3.5 (W-km)−1 and 3 fs are assumed in our calculations, respectively. The nonlinear coefficient is taken as a constant throughout the DIF length since the variation in the core size is typically negligible [19]. In our calculations, the local DIF cubic spectral phase [β3(z)] tracks the distant-dependent quadratic dispersion coefficient [β2(z)] through [20]

β3(z)=(λp2(z)2πc)2(S4πcλp3(z)β2(z)),
where S is the dispersion slope, and λp(z) is the compressed peak instantaneous center wavelength. The importance to keep track of the local peak center wavelength will be discussed later. We note since the value of the dispersion slope is not provided by the vendor, here a nominal value of S = 0.035 (ps/nm2/km) is used throughout the entire DIF length in our calculations. The simulated result (red dashed trace) is plotted against the experimental result in Fig. 2(a) for comparison. The simulated trace coincides with the experimental trace perfectly, both in terms of the compressed peak center wavelength and the FHWM width. In the current case, the spectrally compressed peak is red-shifted to 1578.6 nm during the compression process due to Raman scattering.

 figure: Fig. 2

Fig. 2 Spectral compression results with nearly transform-limited input pulse. (a) Experimental and simulated DIF output spectra under 1.57 mW average power, giving a SCR of 102.8. The compressed peak wavelength is red-shifted to 1578.6 nm. Experimental (b) and simulated (c) results for wavelength tuning of the DIF output compressed peaks.

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We now demonstrate the combination of an fs laser to the DIF yields a versatile wavelength tunable spectrally bright coherent optical source. Figure 2(b) shows our experimental wavelength tunable spectral compression data. By gradually increasing the average power of the laser pulse into the DIF, the compressed spectral peaks are shifted more into the longer wavelengths. The corresponding input laser average powers and the resulting compressed peak wavelengths are listed as: 1.57 mW (1578.6 nm), 2.26 mW (1586.1 nm), 3.30 mW (1602.8 nm), 4.58 mW (1622.8 nm), 6.21 mW (1649.2 nm), 8.21 mW (1673.5 nm), and 10.33 mW (1695.2 nm). The experimental results are compared to split-step Fourier method calculations as shown in Fig. 2(c), and are all found in good agreements in terms of the center wavelengths and the SCRs. The wavelength tuning range achieved here is 116.6 nm, which is an evident improvement as compared to our previous result of 30 nm (using 350 fs input pulse) [16]. Our current results demonstrate that shorter nearly transform-limited input pulse are beneficial both in terms of obtaining a higher SCR and a wider wavelength tuning range. We emphasize here currently our wavelength tuning range is experimentally only limited by our OSA measurement window up to 1700 nm. We note here, wavelength tuning ability is obtained at the expenses of reduced spectral compression. During the red-shifts, the experimental spectral compression ratios are gradually decreased from the maximum of 102.8 (1.57 mW) to 76.13 (2.26 mW), 37.89 (3.33 mW), 36.70 (4.58 mW), 32.89 (6.21 mW), 30.42 (8.21 mW), and 28.30 (10.33 mW). However, we point out even the smallest compression ratio of 28.3 is considered large as compared to past reports [1–4,7–9,11–13,18].

2.3 Structured spectral compression

The ability to generate structured spectrally compressed output is now demonstrated. The working principle is based on soliton fission [20]. Here we focus on the generation of two spectrally bright peaks. Our numerical studies reveal that dual-peaked output spectra as a result of soliton fission with high SCR are facilitated under two simultaneous conditions: (1) when the input pulse is negatively chirped; and (2) the input power should be within a particular range leading to two fissioned fundamental solitons. The above two conditions facilitate soliton fission to yield the desired dual-peaked spectra. The negative input pulse chirp works in unison with the anomalous dispersion of the DIF, so that the soliton fission process can be initiated with a lower input pulse energy. Experimentally, we increased the SMF lengths to 331 cm while keeping the DCF length fixed at 50 cm to provide a negative input pulse chirp. The intensity auto-correlation trace reveals the resulting pulse is broadened to 324 fs FWHM duration. Figure 3(a) shows the experimental dual-peaked spectrally compressed optical spectra (blue solid traces) and the corresponding simulated spectra (red dashed traces) after the DIF. With an average power of 2.45 mW launched into the DIF, two spectrally compressed peaks are successfully generated. The relative intensity ratio of the shorter-wavelength peak (centered at 1554.9 nm, with a FWHM spectral width of 0.9 nm) to the longer-wavelength peak (centered at 1582.1 nm, with a FWHM spectral width of 1.1 nm) is 1:0.61.

 figure: Fig. 3

Fig. 3 Generation and tuning of dual-peaked spectrally compression using negatively chirped input pulse. Results for input average power of (a) 2.45 mW, (b) 2.61 mW, and (c) 4.20 mW demonstrate the tuning ability of the relative amplitudes and wavelength separation of the two spectrally compressed peaks.

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The possibility in adjusting the relative peak intensities and the wavelength separation of the two compressed peaks is now addressed. Figure 3(b) shows with a fixed pulse input chirp, a slight increment in the laser power to 2.61 mW is capable of simultaneously equalizing the two peak intensities and the compressed FWHM widths. The shorter-wavelength peak is now centered at 1557.5 nm (FWHM spectral width of 1.0 nm), while the longer-wavelength peak is centered at 1582.0 nm (FWHM spectral width of 1.0 nm). The intensity equalization process also fine-tunes the wavelength separation of the two peaks, from 27.2 nm as seem in Fig. 3(a) to the current separation of 24.5 nm. By further increasing the input pulse power to 4.2 mW, Fig. 3(c) shows the shorter-wavelength peak is centered at 1572.1 nm (FWHM spectral width of 1.9 nm), while the longer-wavelength peak is centered at 1586.5 nm (FWHM spectral width of 1.4 nm). The wavelength separation of the two peaks is reduced to 14.4 nm, while the relative intensity ratio is adjusted to 0.93:1.

Comparing the calculated spectra shown in Fig. 3 (dual-peaked) to Fig. 2 (single-peaked), it is not difficult to find that single-peaked results are having excellent agreements to the experimental data, but the dual-peaked calculations are having slight deviations. This is particularly true in terms of the compressed peak wavelengths seem in Figs. 3(a) and 3(b). The reason is discussed as follows: in our calculations, β3(z) tracks β2(z) as formulated in Eq. (1). For the single-peaked calculations, the instantaneous center peak wavelength λp(z) is regarded as the precise value. For the dual-peaked cases however, due to the difficulty in separating the overall spectrum as the linear superposition of two independent pulses, we therefore implement λp(z) values using the average of the two center peak wavelengths. This leads to the slight mismatches in the calculated peak wavelengths, and is more evident when the separation of the two peaks becomes wider [Fig. 3(a) having larger deviation as compared to Fig. 3(b)]. On the other hand, the calculation agrees perfectly to experimental data in Fig. 3(c), since the wavelength separation of the two peaks are small enough so that our averaged λp(z) strategy is still valid.

3. Conclusion

In summary, large-scale and structure-tunable spectral compression is performed experimentally through soliton propagation in a DIF. A SCR of 102.8 is obtained by launching 69 fs nearly transform-limited optical pulse into a 1 km DIF with dispersion ratio of 22.5. The spectrally compressed peak wavelength is tunable over a range of 116 nm, however accompanied with slight reduction in the SCR. DIF output spectra with two spectrally compressed peaks are generated using negatively chirped input pulses. Through the interplay of input pulse chirp and energy values, the relative amplitudes and wavelength separation are adjustable. Excellent agreements are reached in comparing our experimental data to simulation results. The dual-peaked spectra result from soliton fission, therefore we highly anticipate the spectral peaks maintains a high degree of coherence. This opens up to interesting future investigations on the quantitative analysis over the coherence properties of the spectrally compressed spectra. We anticipate the combination of an fs laser to a DIF as a practical and versatile new source for various applications. Our presented spectral compression method applies generally for the lasers in the visible and the near-infrared regimes, as long as the optical fiber exhibits anomalous dispersion and low attenuation.

Funding

Ministry of Science and Technology in Taiwan (MoST) (103-2112-M-007-017-MY3).

References and links

1. R. H. Stolen and C. Lin, “Self-phase-modulation in silica optical fibers,” Phys. Rev. A 17(4), 1448–1453 (1978). [CrossRef]  

2. N. L. Markaryan, L. Kh. Muradyan, and T. A. Papazyan, “Spectral compression of ultrashort laser pulses,” Sov. J. Quantum Electron. 21(7), 783–785 (1991). [CrossRef]  

3. M. Karpiński, M. Jachura, L. J. Wright, and B. J. Smith, “Bandwidth manipulation of quantum light by an electro-optic time lens,” Nat. Photonics 11(1), 53–57 (2016). [CrossRef]  

4. M. Allgaier, V. Ansari, L. Sansoni, C. Eigner, V. Quiring, R. Ricken, G. Harder, B. Brecht, and C. Silberhorn, “Highly efficient frequency conversion with bandwidth compression of quantum light,” Nat. Commun. 8, 14288 (2017). [CrossRef]   [PubMed]  

5. J. Lavoie, J. M. Donohue, L. G. Wright, A. Fedrizzi, and K. J. Resch, “Spectral compression of single photons,” Nat. Photonics 7(5), 363–366 (2013). [CrossRef]  

6. M. Nejbauer, T. M. Kardaś, Y. Stepanenko, and C. Radzewicz, “Spectral compression of femtosecond pulses using chirped volume Bragg gratings,” Opt. Lett. 41(11), 2394–2397 (2016). [CrossRef]   [PubMed]  

7. Y.-H. Chen, J.-W. Chang, C.-H. Lin, W.-K. Chang, N. Hsu, Y.-Y. Lai, Q.-H. Tseng, R. Geiss, T. Pertsch, and S. S. Yang, “Spectral narrowing and manipulation in an optical parametric oscillator using periodically poled lithium niobate electro-optic polarization-mode converters,” Opt. Lett. 36(12), 2345–2347 (2011). [CrossRef]   [PubMed]  

8. J. Limpert, T. Gabler, A. Liem, H. Zellmer, and A. Tünnermann, “SPM-induced spectral compression of picosecond pulses in a single-mode Yb-doped fiber amplifier,” Appl. Phys. B 74(2), 191–195 (2002). [CrossRef]  

9. J. Limpert, N. Deguil-Robin, I. Manek-Hönninger, F. Salin, T. Schreiber, A. Liem, E. Röser, H. Zellmer, A. Tünnermann, A. Courjaud, C. Hönninger, and E. Mottay, “High-power picosecond fiber amplifier based on nonlinear spectral compression,” Opt. Lett. 30(7), 714–716 (2005). [CrossRef]   [PubMed]  

10. E. R. Andresen, J. Thøgersen, and S. R. Keiding, “Spectral compression of femtosecond pulses in photonic crystal fibers,” Opt. Lett. 30(15), 2025–2027 (2005). [CrossRef]   [PubMed]  

11. D. A. Sidorov-Biryukov, A. Fernandez, L. Zhu, A. Pugžlys, E. E. Serebryannikov, A. Baltuška, and A. M. Zheltikov, “Spectral narrowing of chirp-free light pulses in anomalously dispersive, highly nonlinear photonic-crystal fibers,” Opt. Express 16(4), 2502–2507 (2008). [CrossRef]   [PubMed]  

12. A. B. Fedotov, A. A. Voronin, I. V. Fedotov, A. A. Ivanov, and A. M. Zheltikov, “Spectral compression of frequency-shifting solitons in a photonic-crystal fiber,” Opt. Lett. 34(5), 662–664 (2009). [CrossRef]   [PubMed]  

13. E. R. Andresen, J. M. Dudley, D. Oron, C. Finot, and H. Rigneault, “Transform-limited spectral compression by self-phase modulation of amplitude-shaped pulses with negative chirp,” Opt. Lett. 36(5), 707–709 (2011). [CrossRef]   [PubMed]  

14. N. Nishizawa, K. Takahashi, Y. Ozeki, and K. Itoh, “Wideband spectral compression of wavelength-tunable ultrashort soliton pulse using comb-profile fiber,” Opt. Express 18(11), 11700–11706 (2010). [CrossRef]   [PubMed]  

15. N. Nishizawa, Y. Andou, E. Omoda, H. Kataura, and Y. Sakakibara, “Characteristics and improvement of wideband wavelength-tunable narrow-linewidth source by spectral compression in quasi-dispersion-increasing comb-profile fiber,” Opt. Express 24(20), 23403–23418 (2016). [CrossRef]   [PubMed]  

16. H.-P. Chuang and C.-B. Huang, “Wavelength-tunable spectral compression in a dispersion-increasing fiber,” Opt. Lett. 36(15), 2848–2850 (2011). [CrossRef]   [PubMed]  

17. W.-T. Chao, Y.-Y. Lin, J.-L. Peng, and C.-B. Huang, “Adiabatic pulse propagation in a dispersion-increasing fiber for spectral compression exceeding the fiber dispersion ratio limitation,” Opt. Lett. 39(4), 853–856 (2014). [CrossRef]   [PubMed]  

18. L. Kh. Mouradian, A. Grigoryan, A. Kutuzyuan, G. Yesayan, M. Sukiasyan, H. Toneyan, A. Zeytunyan, R. Zadoyan, and A. Barthelemy, “Spectral analogue of the soliton effect compression: spectral self-compression,” in Proceedings of Frontiers in Optics (FIO) 2015, OSA Technical Digest (online) (Optical Society of America, 2015), paper FW3F.3.

19. K. R. Tamura and M. Nakazawa, “54-fs, 10-GHz soliton generation from a polarization-maintaining dispersion-flattened dispersion-decreasing fiber pulse compressor,” Opt. Lett. 26(11), 762–764 (2001). [CrossRef]   [PubMed]  

20. G. P. Agrawal, Nonlinear Fiber Optics, 4th ed. (Academic, 2007).

References

  • View by:

  1. R. H. Stolen and C. Lin, “Self-phase-modulation in silica optical fibers,” Phys. Rev. A 17(4), 1448–1453 (1978).
    [Crossref]
  2. N. L. Markaryan, L. Kh. Muradyan, and T. A. Papazyan, “Spectral compression of ultrashort laser pulses,” Sov. J. Quantum Electron. 21(7), 783–785 (1991).
    [Crossref]
  3. M. Karpiński, M. Jachura, L. J. Wright, and B. J. Smith, “Bandwidth manipulation of quantum light by an electro-optic time lens,” Nat. Photonics 11(1), 53–57 (2016).
    [Crossref]
  4. M. Allgaier, V. Ansari, L. Sansoni, C. Eigner, V. Quiring, R. Ricken, G. Harder, B. Brecht, and C. Silberhorn, “Highly efficient frequency conversion with bandwidth compression of quantum light,” Nat. Commun. 8, 14288 (2017).
    [Crossref] [PubMed]
  5. J. Lavoie, J. M. Donohue, L. G. Wright, A. Fedrizzi, and K. J. Resch, “Spectral compression of single photons,” Nat. Photonics 7(5), 363–366 (2013).
    [Crossref]
  6. M. Nejbauer, T. M. Kardaś, Y. Stepanenko, and C. Radzewicz, “Spectral compression of femtosecond pulses using chirped volume Bragg gratings,” Opt. Lett. 41(11), 2394–2397 (2016).
    [Crossref] [PubMed]
  7. Y.-H. Chen, J.-W. Chang, C.-H. Lin, W.-K. Chang, N. Hsu, Y.-Y. Lai, Q.-H. Tseng, R. Geiss, T. Pertsch, and S. S. Yang, “Spectral narrowing and manipulation in an optical parametric oscillator using periodically poled lithium niobate electro-optic polarization-mode converters,” Opt. Lett. 36(12), 2345–2347 (2011).
    [Crossref] [PubMed]
  8. J. Limpert, T. Gabler, A. Liem, H. Zellmer, and A. Tünnermann, “SPM-induced spectral compression of picosecond pulses in a single-mode Yb-doped fiber amplifier,” Appl. Phys. B 74(2), 191–195 (2002).
    [Crossref]
  9. J. Limpert, N. Deguil-Robin, I. Manek-Hönninger, F. Salin, T. Schreiber, A. Liem, E. Röser, H. Zellmer, A. Tünnermann, A. Courjaud, C. Hönninger, and E. Mottay, “High-power picosecond fiber amplifier based on nonlinear spectral compression,” Opt. Lett. 30(7), 714–716 (2005).
    [Crossref] [PubMed]
  10. E. R. Andresen, J. Thøgersen, and S. R. Keiding, “Spectral compression of femtosecond pulses in photonic crystal fibers,” Opt. Lett. 30(15), 2025–2027 (2005).
    [Crossref] [PubMed]
  11. D. A. Sidorov-Biryukov, A. Fernandez, L. Zhu, A. Pugžlys, E. E. Serebryannikov, A. Baltuška, and A. M. Zheltikov, “Spectral narrowing of chirp-free light pulses in anomalously dispersive, highly nonlinear photonic-crystal fibers,” Opt. Express 16(4), 2502–2507 (2008).
    [Crossref] [PubMed]
  12. A. B. Fedotov, A. A. Voronin, I. V. Fedotov, A. A. Ivanov, and A. M. Zheltikov, “Spectral compression of frequency-shifting solitons in a photonic-crystal fiber,” Opt. Lett. 34(5), 662–664 (2009).
    [Crossref] [PubMed]
  13. E. R. Andresen, J. M. Dudley, D. Oron, C. Finot, and H. Rigneault, “Transform-limited spectral compression by self-phase modulation of amplitude-shaped pulses with negative chirp,” Opt. Lett. 36(5), 707–709 (2011).
    [Crossref] [PubMed]
  14. N. Nishizawa, K. Takahashi, Y. Ozeki, and K. Itoh, “Wideband spectral compression of wavelength-tunable ultrashort soliton pulse using comb-profile fiber,” Opt. Express 18(11), 11700–11706 (2010).
    [Crossref] [PubMed]
  15. N. Nishizawa, Y. Andou, E. Omoda, H. Kataura, and Y. Sakakibara, “Characteristics and improvement of wideband wavelength-tunable narrow-linewidth source by spectral compression in quasi-dispersion-increasing comb-profile fiber,” Opt. Express 24(20), 23403–23418 (2016).
    [Crossref] [PubMed]
  16. H.-P. Chuang and C.-B. Huang, “Wavelength-tunable spectral compression in a dispersion-increasing fiber,” Opt. Lett. 36(15), 2848–2850 (2011).
    [Crossref] [PubMed]
  17. W.-T. Chao, Y.-Y. Lin, J.-L. Peng, and C.-B. Huang, “Adiabatic pulse propagation in a dispersion-increasing fiber for spectral compression exceeding the fiber dispersion ratio limitation,” Opt. Lett. 39(4), 853–856 (2014).
    [Crossref] [PubMed]
  18. L. Kh. Mouradian, A. Grigoryan, A. Kutuzyuan, G. Yesayan, M. Sukiasyan, H. Toneyan, A. Zeytunyan, R. Zadoyan, and A. Barthelemy, “Spectral analogue of the soliton effect compression: spectral self-compression,” in Proceedings of Frontiers in Optics (FIO) 2015, OSA Technical Digest (online) (Optical Society of America, 2015), paper FW3F.3.
  19. K. R. Tamura and M. Nakazawa, “54-fs, 10-GHz soliton generation from a polarization-maintaining dispersion-flattened dispersion-decreasing fiber pulse compressor,” Opt. Lett. 26(11), 762–764 (2001).
    [Crossref] [PubMed]
  20. G. P. Agrawal, Nonlinear Fiber Optics, 4th ed. (Academic, 2007).

2017 (1)

M. Allgaier, V. Ansari, L. Sansoni, C. Eigner, V. Quiring, R. Ricken, G. Harder, B. Brecht, and C. Silberhorn, “Highly efficient frequency conversion with bandwidth compression of quantum light,” Nat. Commun. 8, 14288 (2017).
[Crossref] [PubMed]

2016 (3)

2014 (1)

2013 (1)

J. Lavoie, J. M. Donohue, L. G. Wright, A. Fedrizzi, and K. J. Resch, “Spectral compression of single photons,” Nat. Photonics 7(5), 363–366 (2013).
[Crossref]

2011 (3)

2010 (1)

2009 (1)

2008 (1)

2005 (2)

2002 (1)

J. Limpert, T. Gabler, A. Liem, H. Zellmer, and A. Tünnermann, “SPM-induced spectral compression of picosecond pulses in a single-mode Yb-doped fiber amplifier,” Appl. Phys. B 74(2), 191–195 (2002).
[Crossref]

2001 (1)

1991 (1)

N. L. Markaryan, L. Kh. Muradyan, and T. A. Papazyan, “Spectral compression of ultrashort laser pulses,” Sov. J. Quantum Electron. 21(7), 783–785 (1991).
[Crossref]

1978 (1)

R. H. Stolen and C. Lin, “Self-phase-modulation in silica optical fibers,” Phys. Rev. A 17(4), 1448–1453 (1978).
[Crossref]

Allgaier, M.

M. Allgaier, V. Ansari, L. Sansoni, C. Eigner, V. Quiring, R. Ricken, G. Harder, B. Brecht, and C. Silberhorn, “Highly efficient frequency conversion with bandwidth compression of quantum light,” Nat. Commun. 8, 14288 (2017).
[Crossref] [PubMed]

Andou, Y.

Andresen, E. R.

Ansari, V.

M. Allgaier, V. Ansari, L. Sansoni, C. Eigner, V. Quiring, R. Ricken, G. Harder, B. Brecht, and C. Silberhorn, “Highly efficient frequency conversion with bandwidth compression of quantum light,” Nat. Commun. 8, 14288 (2017).
[Crossref] [PubMed]

Baltuška, A.

Brecht, B.

M. Allgaier, V. Ansari, L. Sansoni, C. Eigner, V. Quiring, R. Ricken, G. Harder, B. Brecht, and C. Silberhorn, “Highly efficient frequency conversion with bandwidth compression of quantum light,” Nat. Commun. 8, 14288 (2017).
[Crossref] [PubMed]

Chang, J.-W.

Chang, W.-K.

Chao, W.-T.

Chen, Y.-H.

Chuang, H.-P.

Courjaud, A.

Deguil-Robin, N.

Donohue, J. M.

J. Lavoie, J. M. Donohue, L. G. Wright, A. Fedrizzi, and K. J. Resch, “Spectral compression of single photons,” Nat. Photonics 7(5), 363–366 (2013).
[Crossref]

Dudley, J. M.

Eigner, C.

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Finot, C.

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J. Limpert, T. Gabler, A. Liem, H. Zellmer, and A. Tünnermann, “SPM-induced spectral compression of picosecond pulses in a single-mode Yb-doped fiber amplifier,” Appl. Phys. B 74(2), 191–195 (2002).
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Geiss, R.

Harder, G.

M. Allgaier, V. Ansari, L. Sansoni, C. Eigner, V. Quiring, R. Ricken, G. Harder, B. Brecht, and C. Silberhorn, “Highly efficient frequency conversion with bandwidth compression of quantum light,” Nat. Commun. 8, 14288 (2017).
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M. Karpiński, M. Jachura, L. J. Wright, and B. J. Smith, “Bandwidth manipulation of quantum light by an electro-optic time lens,” Nat. Photonics 11(1), 53–57 (2016).
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M. Karpiński, M. Jachura, L. J. Wright, and B. J. Smith, “Bandwidth manipulation of quantum light by an electro-optic time lens,” Nat. Photonics 11(1), 53–57 (2016).
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Keiding, S. R.

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J. Lavoie, J. M. Donohue, L. G. Wright, A. Fedrizzi, and K. J. Resch, “Spectral compression of single photons,” Nat. Photonics 7(5), 363–366 (2013).
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N. L. Markaryan, L. Kh. Muradyan, and T. A. Papazyan, “Spectral compression of ultrashort laser pulses,” Sov. J. Quantum Electron. 21(7), 783–785 (1991).
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M. Allgaier, V. Ansari, L. Sansoni, C. Eigner, V. Quiring, R. Ricken, G. Harder, B. Brecht, and C. Silberhorn, “Highly efficient frequency conversion with bandwidth compression of quantum light,” Nat. Commun. 8, 14288 (2017).
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Resch, K. J.

J. Lavoie, J. M. Donohue, L. G. Wright, A. Fedrizzi, and K. J. Resch, “Spectral compression of single photons,” Nat. Photonics 7(5), 363–366 (2013).
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M. Allgaier, V. Ansari, L. Sansoni, C. Eigner, V. Quiring, R. Ricken, G. Harder, B. Brecht, and C. Silberhorn, “Highly efficient frequency conversion with bandwidth compression of quantum light,” Nat. Commun. 8, 14288 (2017).
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M. Karpiński, M. Jachura, L. J. Wright, and B. J. Smith, “Bandwidth manipulation of quantum light by an electro-optic time lens,” Nat. Photonics 11(1), 53–57 (2016).
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M. Karpiński, M. Jachura, L. J. Wright, and B. J. Smith, “Bandwidth manipulation of quantum light by an electro-optic time lens,” Nat. Photonics 11(1), 53–57 (2016).
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Appl. Phys. B (1)

J. Limpert, T. Gabler, A. Liem, H. Zellmer, and A. Tünnermann, “SPM-induced spectral compression of picosecond pulses in a single-mode Yb-doped fiber amplifier,” Appl. Phys. B 74(2), 191–195 (2002).
[Crossref]

Nat. Commun. (1)

M. Allgaier, V. Ansari, L. Sansoni, C. Eigner, V. Quiring, R. Ricken, G. Harder, B. Brecht, and C. Silberhorn, “Highly efficient frequency conversion with bandwidth compression of quantum light,” Nat. Commun. 8, 14288 (2017).
[Crossref] [PubMed]

Nat. Photonics (2)

J. Lavoie, J. M. Donohue, L. G. Wright, A. Fedrizzi, and K. J. Resch, “Spectral compression of single photons,” Nat. Photonics 7(5), 363–366 (2013).
[Crossref]

M. Karpiński, M. Jachura, L. J. Wright, and B. J. Smith, “Bandwidth manipulation of quantum light by an electro-optic time lens,” Nat. Photonics 11(1), 53–57 (2016).
[Crossref]

Opt. Express (3)

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Phys. Rev. A (1)

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[Crossref]

Sov. J. Quantum Electron. (1)

N. L. Markaryan, L. Kh. Muradyan, and T. A. Papazyan, “Spectral compression of ultrashort laser pulses,” Sov. J. Quantum Electron. 21(7), 783–785 (1991).
[Crossref]

Other (2)

L. Kh. Mouradian, A. Grigoryan, A. Kutuzyuan, G. Yesayan, M. Sukiasyan, H. Toneyan, A. Zeytunyan, R. Zadoyan, and A. Barthelemy, “Spectral analogue of the soliton effect compression: spectral self-compression,” in Proceedings of Frontiers in Optics (FIO) 2015, OSA Technical Digest (online) (Optical Society of America, 2015), paper FW3F.3.

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Figures (3)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1 (a) Schematics of the experimental setup. SMF: single-mode fiber; V-ATT: variable optical attenuator; DCF: dispersion-compensating fiber; OC: optical coupler; PM: power meter; DIF: dispersion-increasing fiber; SP: splicing point; OSA: optical spectrum analyzer; IA: intensity auto-correlator. The dispersion ramp for the DIF is also plotted. (b) Fs laser initial spectrum. (c) Intensity auto-correlation traces of the fs fiber laser and the sech fitting of same FWHM duration.
Fig. 2
Fig. 2 Spectral compression results with nearly transform-limited input pulse. (a) Experimental and simulated DIF output spectra under 1.57 mW average power, giving a SCR of 102.8. The compressed peak wavelength is red-shifted to 1578.6 nm. Experimental (b) and simulated (c) results for wavelength tuning of the DIF output compressed peaks.
Fig. 3
Fig. 3 Generation and tuning of dual-peaked spectrally compression using negatively chirped input pulse. Results for input average power of (a) 2.45 mW, (b) 2.61 mW, and (c) 4.20 mW demonstrate the tuning ability of the relative amplitudes and wavelength separation of the two spectrally compressed peaks.

Equations (1)

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β 3 (z)= ( λ p 2 (z) 2πc ) 2 ( S 4πc λ p 3 (z) β 2 (z) ),

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