Abstract

The results presented in Fig. 8 were incorrect; the growth in the weld structure presented was due to the laser taking 3 ms to reach full power. Here we present a corrected version of the figure and associated discussion. It should be noted that this affects only the exact number of pulses required to form the weld structure and some of the low pulse number observations. This does not therefore affect the theory presented in the paper. In addition Fig. 9 and Fig. 10 were reversed in the published version. The correct figures are presented below.

© 2015 Optical Society of America

Figure 8 of our manuscript [1] illustrated the growth of a weld formation with an increasing number of incident laser pulses. The growth shown is the result of the laser requiring 3 ms to reach full pulse energy and as a result follows the incident pulse energy and not the absorption dynamics. In Fig. 8 below we present corrected results. There is permanent modification after a single pulse and the weld structure thus forms after fewer pulses than previously reported. Nevertheless the weld structure still forms following the outlined theory in [1], only the timescale was in error.

 

Fig. 8 Evolution of plasma affected region and HAZ with increasing incident pulses of 21.25 µJ in a single fused silica sample. Phase contrast imaging has been used to provide clearer images.

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In addition the images (but not the captions) for Fig. 9 and Fig. 10 in the presented manuscript were inadvertently swapped. The correct figures and captions are presented below.

 

Fig. 9 Left: cross-sections of different welding patterns of etched grooves experiments label-marked points in Fig. 5. A to D: pulse energy used was 10.1, 11.23, 12.9 and 18.8 µJ respectively. Right: illustration of the evolution of the weld structure with varying incident average power. 1) low power without HAZ; a neat plasma modification line in the bottom glass. 2) plasma escapes with ejecting melt creating irregular ablation, 3) plasma generated at both the top and bottom material but neither of them are strong enough to generate a stable bond, 4) melt bridging the gap providing a bridging corridor for the plasma and a continuous weld.

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Fig. 10 Left: cross-sections of different welding patterns of etched grooves experiments label-marked point in Fig. 6. A-D.: focal position is −24.1 µm, −40.0 µm, −86.5 µm and −107.3 µm respectively. Right: illustration of mechanism of left photo.

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References and links

1. J. Chen, R. M. Carter, R. R. Thomson, and D. P. Hand, “Avoiding the requirement for pre-existing optical contact during picosecond laser glass-to-glass welding,” Opt. Express 23(14), 18645–18657 (2015). [CrossRef]   [PubMed]  

References

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  1. J. Chen, R. M. Carter, R. R. Thomson, and D. P. Hand, “Avoiding the requirement for pre-existing optical contact during picosecond laser glass-to-glass welding,” Opt. Express 23(14), 18645–18657 (2015).
    [Crossref] [PubMed]

2015 (1)

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Figures (3)

Fig. 8
Fig. 8 Evolution of plasma affected region and HAZ with increasing incident pulses of 21.25 µJ in a single fused silica sample. Phase contrast imaging has been used to provide clearer images.
Fig. 9
Fig. 9 Left: cross-sections of different welding patterns of etched grooves experiments label-marked points in Fig. 5. A to D: pulse energy used was 10.1, 11.23, 12.9 and 18.8 µJ respectively. Right: illustration of the evolution of the weld structure with varying incident average power. 1) low power without HAZ; a neat plasma modification line in the bottom glass. 2) plasma escapes with ejecting melt creating irregular ablation, 3) plasma generated at both the top and bottom material but neither of them are strong enough to generate a stable bond, 4) melt bridging the gap providing a bridging corridor for the plasma and a continuous weld.
Fig. 10
Fig. 10 Left: cross-sections of different welding patterns of etched grooves experiments label-marked point in Fig. 6. A-D.: focal position is −24.1 µm, −40.0 µm, −86.5 µm and −107.3 µm respectively. Right: illustration of mechanism of left photo.

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