Abstract

Using single-stage C-band EDFAs equalized to 41 nm, we transmit 152x200 Gb/s PDM 16QAM channels with 6.0 b/s/Hz spectral efficiency over 9,748 km enabled by Nyquist spectral shaping and digital back propagation. 76x400 Gb/s channels are also transmitted over 8,665 km detecting two 200 Gb/s channels simultaneously using a single wideband receiver. Digital back propagation benefit versus channel pre-emphasis, transmission distance and wavelength are experimentally investigated.

© 2014 Optical Society of America

1. Introduction

To meet the ever increasing demand on capacity and keep the cost per bit low, undersea systems with large capacity are desirable since the cost of the optical layer can be amortized over more capacity. However, it is technically challenging to achieve undersea systems that simultaneously have long-reach, high spectral efficiency (SE), and wide-bandwidth operation [1]. The previous capacity-distance record of 221 Pb/s•km was demonstrated by transmitting 292x104.7 Gb/s over 7,230 km at 6.1 b/s/Hz using 40 nm in the C-band [2]. Recently, this record was improved to 223 Pb/s•km by transmitting 31 Tb/s (155x200 Gb/s) over 7,200 km using 62 nm in the C- and L-band [3], and 306 Pb/s•km by transmitting 30 Tb/s (350x85.74 Gb/s) over 10,180 km using 71 nm in the C- and L-band [4]. To achieve similar capacity distance product using only the C-band, more optical signal to noise ratio (OSNR) is needed requiring more amplifier power which results in more nonlinear penalty and nonlinearity compensation (NLC) becomes indispensable. Digital back propagation (DBP) was proposed as a technique for compensating all fiber impairments [5, 6]. DBP has been shown effective in enabling higher launch power and longer system reach for transmission over dispersion uncompensated links [7, 8]. In particular, DBP enabled (1) 10,181 km transmission over 8 nm optical bandwidth at 4.7 b/s/Hz SE using 100 Gb/s PDM 16QAM OFDM [7] and (2) 10,180 km transmission over 28 nm optical bandwidth at 6.0 b/s/Hz SE using 200 Gb/s PDM 16QAM [8].

In this work we demonstrate the first DBP assisted transmission over the full-C band with a capacity-distance product of >296 Pb/s•km. We transmit 152 33.3GHz spaced 200 Gb/s 16QAM channels (symbol rate 32 GBd, or line bitrate 256 Gb/s) over 9,748 km distance with a SE of 6.0 b/s/Hz. Moreover, we transmit 76 dual wavelength 400 Gb/s channels over 8,665 km detecting two wavelengths simultaneously using a single receiver with 33 GHz analog bandwidth and 100 GSa/s. We use transmitter digital signal processing (DSP) and digital to analog converters (DACs) for near Nyquist spectral shaping [9] in combination with our polarization division multiplexed (PDM) half single parity check bit interleaved coded modulation (HSPC BICM) with iterative decoding to achieve high SE and high receiver sensitivity [2]. We use single stage Erbium doped fiber amplifiers (EDFA) equalized to 41 nm (full C-band) in combination with large effective area, low loss pure silica core fiber spans. All 200 Gb/s and dual wavelength 400 Gb/s channels decode with no errors using HSPC and iterative decoding between a two symbol based soft-in/soft-output (SISO) maximum a posteriori probability (MAP) decoder and a low density parity check (LDPC) based forward error correction (FEC) algorithm. We experimentally show that DBP benefit scales monotonically with channel power and transmission distance over the full C-band.

2. Experiment

Figure 1 shows the schematic of our 3-rail transmitter [8, 10]. For the first path (yellow) we combine 152 lasers onto 33.33 GHz spacing and modulate all channels with our transmitter waveform generated by digital to analogue converter (DAC). To maintain high transmitter OSNR, we use two additional modulation paths with odd (green) and even (brown) channels that combined carry 8 successive wavelengths using external cavity lasers (ECL). For the transmission measurements, we turn off 8 loading channels from path 1, and block ASE noise from path 1 in a bandwidth (266.6 GHz) commensurate with 8 consecutive channels using a wavelength selective switch (WSS) and insert the 8 channels from paths 2 (green) and 3 (brown). All three rails show similar noise loaded back-to-back performance.

 figure: Fig. 1

Fig. 1 Schematic of de-correlated 3 rail 152x200 Gb/s Nyquist PDM 16QAM transmitter, circulating loop test bed and 200/400 Gb/s PDM 16QAM receiver with dual 100 GS/s sampling scopes.

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We drive each data modulator with waveforms that we create using DSP to form HSPC-BICM transmission channels with raised cosine spectra. The details of the coded modulation scheme can be found in [2, 8, 10]. The forward error correction (FEC) frame structure is designed for joint coding on both polarizations and uses a truncated 219-1 pseudo-random binary sequence as input to 30 identical encoders. The encoders are based on LDPC(18360, 15300) with girth 8 and column weight 4. The encoded bit-streams are interleaved and partially encoded by a 7/8 SPC code and then block interleaved to form the coded symbols with 28% overall overhead. The FEC encoded symbol sequences are re-sampled and the resulting waveforms are filtered with a combination of a raised cosine filter (β = 0.001) and a pre-distortion filter to compensate for the transfer functions of the DACs, driver amplifiers and I/Q modulators. The combined filter is implemented in frequency domain using 8K FFT similar as filter for chromatic dispersion compensation. With the DACs running at 57 GSa/s, this results in 256 Gb/s channels at a symbol rate of 32 GBd and a net data rate of 200 Gb/s achieving 6.0 b/s/Hz SE at 33.33 GHz wavelength spacing.

At the receiver the selected channel is mixed with a local oscillator (LO) in a polarization diversity 90° optical hybrid. To receive a 200 Gb/s signal we tune the LO to the center of the received wavelength. To receive a dual wavelength 400 Gb/s channel we tune the LO between two 200 Gb/s wavelengths and digitize both simultaneously. The signals from the optical hybrid are sampled at 100 GSa/s using two interleaved digital oscilloscopes with 33 GHz analog bandwidth. Our receiver DSP algorithms [2, 8, 10] digitally filter the 200 Gb/s signals/tributaries to suppress linear cross-talk and re-sample with the recovered clock. Dispersion and NLC are performed for each 200 Gb/s signal/tributary in our DSP algorithm using DBP [5, 6]. We use two steps per span and optimize the nonlinear coefficient in the DBP algorithm for best performance. The bandwidth of the received signal in the DBP calculations is about 35 GHz. Polarization demultiplexing, signal equalization and carrier phase recovery are carried out by adaptive butterfly finite impulse response filters using a modified constant modulus algorithm. After initial convergence, a decision-directed least-mean-square algorithm is applied to further optimize the performance. The demodulated data are sent to two soft-input/soft-output MAP decoders and two demappers to calculate the bit log-likelihood ratios and forward them to the LDPC decoders. The extrinsic information from the LDPC decoders is re-interleaved and sent back to the MAP decoders and the demappers to be used as a priori information in the next iteration. After 5 iterations between the LDPC decoders and MAP decoders, the algorithm provides an estimated Q factor threshold of 4.9 dB at a bit error ratio (BER) of 10−15.

The transmission path consists of nine hybrid spans that are made up of two types of ultra low loss pure silica core fiber as shown in Fig. 1. Each span is approximately 60 km long and the effective area is 146 and 114 μm2 for the 1st 30-km and the 2nd 30-km respectively. The dispersion and loss of both fiber types are similar with an average value of 20.5 ps/nm-km and 0.161 dB/km, respectively, at 1550 nm. We use single-stage C-band EDFAs equalized to 41 nm bandwidth and set to 20.5 dBm output power which corresponds to an average power per 200 Gb/s channel of −1.3 dBm launched into the transmission fiber. We configure the 9 spans into a 541.6 km transmission loop that includes a gain equalization filter to correct residual gain error and a loop synchronous polarization controller (LSPC) to properly account for polarization dependent loss (PDL) and polarization mode dispersion (PMD) in the loop.

3. Transmission results

Figure 2 shows performance vs. transmitter pre-emphasis curves for 3 different channels at 1532.42 nm, 1547.45 nm 1564.41 nm along with the noise loaded back to back (BtB) performance of our 16QAM setup at 6.0 b/s/Hz SE and theoretical 16QAM performance at 32 GBd. For 200 Gb/s channels, we achieve a minimum required OSNR of <16.4 dB at the FEC threshold (4.9 dB) which corresponds to an implementation penalty of 1.0 dB compared to the single channel theoretical limit. For a 400 Gb/s channel, the implementation penalty is increased to about 1.4 dB, which is about 0.5 dB less than the previous result in [8]. The extra implementation penalty for dual wavelength 400 Gb/s channels is likely caused by hardware limitations in our receiver similar as explained in [11].

 figure: Fig. 2

Fig. 2 Performance (with NLC) vs. transmitter pre emphasis along with noise loaded back to back at 6.0 b/s/Hz SE. Left: 200Gb/s after 9,207 km (17 loops); right: 400Gb/s after 8,124 km (15 loops)

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We change the pre-emphasis by varying the power of a group of 8 contiguous 200 Gb/s channels and plot the performance of the channel at the center of the group vs. received OSNR. Please note that the pre-emphasis distance is different for 200 Gb/s (9,207 km) and 400 Gb/s (7,124 km) measurements due to the poor BtB performance of 400 Gb/s. Moreover, we make the pre-emphasis distance 1-loop shorter than the distance in the full capacity measurements to be able to measure the performance at higher and lower power levels.

Similar to other transmission experiments using EDFAs with ~40 nm BW [10], the optimum OSNR at the short wavelength region is ~1-2 dB lower, and there is a residual offset from the BtB curve at low transmitter pre-emphasis, as shown in Fig. 2 for both 200 Gb/s and 400 Gb/s pre-emphasis measurements. The lower optimum OSNR of the short wavelength region is due to that the short wavelength region is noisier, hence more signal power is required and the short wavelength channels reach their nonlinear limit at lower OSNR. The residual offset at low transmitter pre-emphasis is caused by broadband nonlinear interaction of the measurement channel with the rest of the 40 nm amplifier BW [12]. The NLC benefit increases monotonically with received OSNR for all 3 channels, however, the NLC benefit at the optimum OSNR is different: ~1.2 dB for the two long channels, and ~1-dB benefit for the short wavelength. The overall performance of this 40 nm system is limited by the short-wavelength channels; thus, the testbed operating power is set according to Ch20/Ch10 for 200/400 Gb/s.

Figure 3 shows the mean performance for the same three channels as a function of distance at nominal power. For 200/400 Gb/s channels, the FEC limit is reached at ~10,000/9,300 km for the shortest wavelength channel measured. Although the other 2 channels can reach more than 10,000 km for both 200/400 Gb/s channels, we choose a distance of 9,748/8,665 km for 200/400 Gb/s full capacity measurement to allocate some margin for Q fluctuations. In Fig. 3, we also show the NLC benefit vs. transmission distance, the NLC benefit increase monotonically with distance for all 200 Gb/s and 400 Gb/s channels [10, 13]. We also observe that the 200 Gb/s NLC benefit is slightly larger than that of 400 Gb/s.

 figure: Fig. 3

Fig. 3 Transmission performance for three channels at nominal power.

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Figure 4 shows the received OSNR (1 dB/div) and optical spectrum (5 dB/div) for 152 channels after 9,748 km transmission with transmitter pre-emphasis. The insert shows details of the received optical spectrum in the center of the transmission band. The received OSNR has a positive tilt with an average of 19.7 dB. As seen in Fig. 4, the optical power of short wavelength region is higher in order to achieve similar OSNR as in long wavelength region.

 figure: Fig. 4

Fig. 4 Received OSNR (in 0.1nm RBW) and optical spectrum after 9,748 km.

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The result of the 200 Gb/s full loading experiment is shown in Fig. 5, 152x200 Gb/s channels are transmitted over 9,748 km resulting a capacity-distance product of >296 Pb/s•km. For each channel we acquire 10 measurements with 4 million samples each corresponding to >45 million bits for error counting per channel and more than 6.84 billion bits is processed in total. We report Q calculated from the average BER both before and after NLC. The average before NLC Q-factor of all 152 channels is ~4.64 dB with individual channels ranging from 4.01 dB to 5.27 dB. The average Q-factor after NLC of all 152 channels is ~5.45 dB with individual channels ranging from 4.95 dB to 6.07 dB. Each of the 10 measurements for each channel after NLC is also separately processed by our FEC algorithm and all frames decode without error. Among 1520 (152ch x 10 per channel) measurements, no measurement needs 5th iteration, and only 2 measurements need to go through the 4th iteration.

 figure: Fig. 5

Fig. 5 200 Gb/s (152x256 Gb/s) performance at 6.0 b/s/Hz after 9,748 km.

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The result of the 400 Gb/s full loading experiment after 8,665 km is shown in Fig. 6. For each channel we acquire 10 measurements with 4 million samples each corresponding to >90 million bits for error counting per channel and more than 6.84 billion bits processed in total. The average before NLC Q-factor of all 76 channels is ~4.79 dB with individual channels ranging from 4.21 dB to 5.32 dB. The average after NLC Q-factor of all 152 channels is ~5.44 dB with individual channels ranging from 4.97 dB to 5.98 dB. All after NLC measurements are also separately processed by our FEC algorithm and all frames decode without error. Among 760 (76ch x 10 per channel) measurement, 1 measurement needs to go though the 4th iteration, and 4 measurements need to go through the 3rd iteration; and all other measurements reached error free after the 2nd iteration.

 figure: Fig. 6

Fig. 6 400 Gb/s (76x512 Gb/s) performance at 6.0 b/s/Hz after 8,665 km.

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In both Figs. 5 and 6, we also show the highest and lowest Q value after NLC from the set of 10 measurements as indicated by the whiskers. Since joint coding for orthogonal polarization is used, therefore, the performance fluctuation is very small. Note not all channels reach their optimum OSNR value, consequently the NLC benefit is channel dependent and is < 1.0 dB for most 200 Gb/s channels and <0.8 dB for most 400 Gb/s channels. For the short wavelength region, the higher launch power and path average power as shown in Fig. 4 result in a larger proportion of intra-channel nonlinearity, therefore larger NLC benefit in the short wavelength region. This conclusion is similar as in [13], although 28 nm testbed was used in that paper.

4. Discussions

Transmission over wide optical bandwidth and over transoceanic distance is challenging [1] and extending the BW to the full C-band while keeping the DBP gain is even more challenging. Ref [7] showed ~1-dB DBP benefit in 8 nm BW, and Ref [8] showed 0.65 dB DBP benefit (from 0.39 dB to 1.32 dB) over 28 nm BW. In this paper, we demonstrate 0.8 dB (from 0.60 dB to 1.11 dB) DBP benefit over 40 nm BW. This is achieved with the following improvements relative to [8]: 1) better DAC equalization hence better BtB performance, 2) better gain equalization strategy to minimize path average power variation over the transmission line, 3) optimized DBP parameters.

5. Conclusions

152x200 Gb/s PDM 16QAM channels are successfully transmitted over 9,748 km with 6.0 b/s/Hz SE using 60 km spans and single stage EDFAs equalized to 41 nm BW. This capacity-distance product of >296 Pb/s•km is enabled by Nyquist spectral shaping using transmitter DSP and DACs in combination with nonlinearity compensation based on digital back propagation. We also demonstrate 76 dual wavelength 400 Gb/s channels over 8,665 km detecting two wavelengths simultaneously using a single receiver. All channels are decoded with no errors after transmission using HSPC BICM with iterative decoding between an LDPC based FEC algorithm and a MAP decoder, which allows us to get both high SE and good receiver sensitivity.

References and links

1. J.-X. Cai, “100G transmission over transoceanic distance with high spectral efficiency and large capacity,” J. Lightwave Technol. 30(24), 3845–3856 (2012). [CrossRef]  

2. H. Zhang, H. G. Batshon, D. G. Foursa, M. V. Mazurczyk, J.-X. Cai, C. R. Davidson, A. Pilipetskii, G. Mohs, and N. S. Bergano, “30.58 Tb/s transmission over 7,230 km using PDM half 4D-16QAM coded modulation with 6.1 b/s/Hz spectral efficiency,” in Proceedings of OFC/NFOEC (2013), OTu2B.3. [CrossRef]  

3. M. Salsi, A. Ghazisaeidi, P. Tran, R. Muller, L. Schmalen, J. Renaudier, H. Mardoyan, P. Brindel, G. Charlet, and S. Bigo, “31 Tb/s transmission over 7,200 km using 46 Gbaud PDM-8QAM with optimized error correcting code rate,” in Proceedings of OECC (2013), PDP3-5.

4. D. Qian, M.-F. Huang, S. Zhang, Y. Zhang, Y.-K. Huang, F. Yaman, I. B. Djordjevic, and E. Mateo, “30Tb/s C- and L-bands bidirectional transmission over 10,181km with 121km span length,” Opt. Express 21(12), 14244–14250 (2013). [CrossRef]   [PubMed]  

5. F. Yaman and G. Li, “Nonlinear impairment compensation for polarization-division multiplexed WDM transmission using digital backward propagation,” IEEE J. Photonics. 1(2), 144–152 (2009). [CrossRef]  

6. E. Ip and J. M. Kahn, “Compensation of dispersion and nonlinear impairments using digital back propagation,” J. Lightwave Technol. 26(20), 3416–3425 (2008). [CrossRef]  

7. S. Zhang, M. Huang, F. Yaman, E. Mateo, D. Qian, Y. Zhang, L. Xu, Y. Shao, I. Djordjevic, T. Wang, Y. Inada, T. Inoue, T. Ogata, and Y. Aoki, “40×117.6 Gb/s PDM-16QAM OFDM transmission over 10,181 km with soft-decision LDPC coding and nonlinearity compensation,” in Proceedings of OFC/NFOEC (2012), PDP5C.4.

8. H. Zhang, J.-X. Cai, H. G. Batshon, M. V. Mazurczyk, O. Sinkin, D. G. Foursa, A. Pilipetskii, G. Mohs, and N. S. Bergano, “200 Gb/s and dual wavelength 400 Gb/s transmission over transpacific distance at 6.0 b/s/Hz spectral efficiency,” in Proceedings of OFC/NFOEC (2013), PDP5A.6.

9. M. V. Mazurczyk, “Spectral shaping for high spectral efficiency in long-haul optical transmission systems,” in Proceedings of ECOC (2013), We.4.D.2.

10. J.-X. Cai, H. Zhang, H. G. Batshon, M. V. Mazurczyk, O. Sinkin, D. G. Foursa, A. Pilipetskii, G. Mohs, and N. S. Bergano, “200 Gb/s and dual wavelength 400 Gb/s transmission over transpacific distance at 6.0 b/s/Hz spectral efficiency,” accepted to J. Lightwave Technol.

11. P. Winzer, “High-spectral-efficiency optical modulation formats,” J. Lightwave Technol. 30(24), 3824–3835 (2012). [CrossRef]  

12. O. V. Sinkin, J.-X. Cai, D. G. Foursa, G. Mohs, and A. Pilipetskii, “Impact of broadband four-wave mixing on system characterization,” in Proceedings of OFC/NFOEC (2013), OTh3G.3. [CrossRef]  

13. J.-X. Cai, O. V. Sinkin, H. Zhang, H. G. Batshon, M. V. Mazurczyk, D. G. Foursa, A. Pilipetskii, and G. Mohs, “Nonlinearity compensation benefit in high capacity ultra-long haul transmission systems,” in Proceedings of ECOC (2013), We.4.D.2.

References

  • View by:

  1. J.-X. Cai, “100G transmission over transoceanic distance with high spectral efficiency and large capacity,” J. Lightwave Technol. 30(24), 3845–3856 (2012).
    [Crossref]
  2. H. Zhang, H. G. Batshon, D. G. Foursa, M. V. Mazurczyk, J.-X. Cai, C. R. Davidson, A. Pilipetskii, G. Mohs, and N. S. Bergano, “30.58 Tb/s transmission over 7,230 km using PDM half 4D-16QAM coded modulation with 6.1 b/s/Hz spectral efficiency,” in Proceedings of OFC/NFOEC (2013), OTu2B.3.
    [Crossref]
  3. M. Salsi, A. Ghazisaeidi, P. Tran, R. Muller, L. Schmalen, J. Renaudier, H. Mardoyan, P. Brindel, G. Charlet, and S. Bigo, “31 Tb/s transmission over 7,200 km using 46 Gbaud PDM-8QAM with optimized error correcting code rate,” in Proceedings of OECC (2013), PDP3-5.
  4. D. Qian, M.-F. Huang, S. Zhang, Y. Zhang, Y.-K. Huang, F. Yaman, I. B. Djordjevic, and E. Mateo, “30Tb/s C- and L-bands bidirectional transmission over 10,181km with 121km span length,” Opt. Express 21(12), 14244–14250 (2013).
    [Crossref] [PubMed]
  5. F. Yaman and G. Li, “Nonlinear impairment compensation for polarization-division multiplexed WDM transmission using digital backward propagation,” IEEE J. Photonics. 1(2), 144–152 (2009).
    [Crossref]
  6. E. Ip and J. M. Kahn, “Compensation of dispersion and nonlinear impairments using digital back propagation,” J. Lightwave Technol. 26(20), 3416–3425 (2008).
    [Crossref]
  7. S. Zhang, M. Huang, F. Yaman, E. Mateo, D. Qian, Y. Zhang, L. Xu, Y. Shao, I. Djordjevic, T. Wang, Y. Inada, T. Inoue, T. Ogata, and Y. Aoki, “40×117.6 Gb/s PDM-16QAM OFDM transmission over 10,181 km with soft-decision LDPC coding and nonlinearity compensation,” in Proceedings of OFC/NFOEC (2012), PDP5C.4.
  8. H. Zhang, J.-X. Cai, H. G. Batshon, M. V. Mazurczyk, O. Sinkin, D. G. Foursa, A. Pilipetskii, G. Mohs, and N. S. Bergano, “200 Gb/s and dual wavelength 400 Gb/s transmission over transpacific distance at 6.0 b/s/Hz spectral efficiency,” in Proceedings of OFC/NFOEC (2013), PDP5A.6.
  9. M. V. Mazurczyk, “Spectral shaping for high spectral efficiency in long-haul optical transmission systems,” in Proceedings of ECOC (2013), We.4.D.2.
  10. J.-X. Cai, H. Zhang, H. G. Batshon, M. V. Mazurczyk, O. Sinkin, D. G. Foursa, A. Pilipetskii, G. Mohs, and N. S. Bergano, “200 Gb/s and dual wavelength 400 Gb/s transmission over transpacific distance at 6.0 b/s/Hz spectral efficiency,” accepted to J. Lightwave Technol.
  11. P. Winzer, “High-spectral-efficiency optical modulation formats,” J. Lightwave Technol. 30(24), 3824–3835 (2012).
    [Crossref]
  12. O. V. Sinkin, J.-X. Cai, D. G. Foursa, G. Mohs, and A. Pilipetskii, “Impact of broadband four-wave mixing on system characterization,” in Proceedings of OFC/NFOEC (2013), OTh3G.3.
    [Crossref]
  13. J.-X. Cai, O. V. Sinkin, H. Zhang, H. G. Batshon, M. V. Mazurczyk, D. G. Foursa, A. Pilipetskii, and G. Mohs, “Nonlinearity compensation benefit in high capacity ultra-long haul transmission systems,” in Proceedings of ECOC (2013), We.4.D.2.

2013 (1)

2012 (2)

2009 (1)

F. Yaman and G. Li, “Nonlinear impairment compensation for polarization-division multiplexed WDM transmission using digital backward propagation,” IEEE J. Photonics. 1(2), 144–152 (2009).
[Crossref]

2008 (1)

Cai, J.-X.

Djordjevic, I. B.

Huang, M.-F.

Huang, Y.-K.

Ip, E.

Kahn, J. M.

Li, G.

F. Yaman and G. Li, “Nonlinear impairment compensation for polarization-division multiplexed WDM transmission using digital backward propagation,” IEEE J. Photonics. 1(2), 144–152 (2009).
[Crossref]

Mateo, E.

Qian, D.

Winzer, P.

Yaman, F.

D. Qian, M.-F. Huang, S. Zhang, Y. Zhang, Y.-K. Huang, F. Yaman, I. B. Djordjevic, and E. Mateo, “30Tb/s C- and L-bands bidirectional transmission over 10,181km with 121km span length,” Opt. Express 21(12), 14244–14250 (2013).
[Crossref] [PubMed]

F. Yaman and G. Li, “Nonlinear impairment compensation for polarization-division multiplexed WDM transmission using digital backward propagation,” IEEE J. Photonics. 1(2), 144–152 (2009).
[Crossref]

Zhang, S.

Zhang, Y.

IEEE J. Photonics. (1)

F. Yaman and G. Li, “Nonlinear impairment compensation for polarization-division multiplexed WDM transmission using digital backward propagation,” IEEE J. Photonics. 1(2), 144–152 (2009).
[Crossref]

J. Lightwave Technol. (3)

Opt. Express (1)

Other (8)

O. V. Sinkin, J.-X. Cai, D. G. Foursa, G. Mohs, and A. Pilipetskii, “Impact of broadband four-wave mixing on system characterization,” in Proceedings of OFC/NFOEC (2013), OTh3G.3.
[Crossref]

J.-X. Cai, O. V. Sinkin, H. Zhang, H. G. Batshon, M. V. Mazurczyk, D. G. Foursa, A. Pilipetskii, and G. Mohs, “Nonlinearity compensation benefit in high capacity ultra-long haul transmission systems,” in Proceedings of ECOC (2013), We.4.D.2.

H. Zhang, H. G. Batshon, D. G. Foursa, M. V. Mazurczyk, J.-X. Cai, C. R. Davidson, A. Pilipetskii, G. Mohs, and N. S. Bergano, “30.58 Tb/s transmission over 7,230 km using PDM half 4D-16QAM coded modulation with 6.1 b/s/Hz spectral efficiency,” in Proceedings of OFC/NFOEC (2013), OTu2B.3.
[Crossref]

M. Salsi, A. Ghazisaeidi, P. Tran, R. Muller, L. Schmalen, J. Renaudier, H. Mardoyan, P. Brindel, G. Charlet, and S. Bigo, “31 Tb/s transmission over 7,200 km using 46 Gbaud PDM-8QAM with optimized error correcting code rate,” in Proceedings of OECC (2013), PDP3-5.

S. Zhang, M. Huang, F. Yaman, E. Mateo, D. Qian, Y. Zhang, L. Xu, Y. Shao, I. Djordjevic, T. Wang, Y. Inada, T. Inoue, T. Ogata, and Y. Aoki, “40×117.6 Gb/s PDM-16QAM OFDM transmission over 10,181 km with soft-decision LDPC coding and nonlinearity compensation,” in Proceedings of OFC/NFOEC (2012), PDP5C.4.

H. Zhang, J.-X. Cai, H. G. Batshon, M. V. Mazurczyk, O. Sinkin, D. G. Foursa, A. Pilipetskii, G. Mohs, and N. S. Bergano, “200 Gb/s and dual wavelength 400 Gb/s transmission over transpacific distance at 6.0 b/s/Hz spectral efficiency,” in Proceedings of OFC/NFOEC (2013), PDP5A.6.

M. V. Mazurczyk, “Spectral shaping for high spectral efficiency in long-haul optical transmission systems,” in Proceedings of ECOC (2013), We.4.D.2.

J.-X. Cai, H. Zhang, H. G. Batshon, M. V. Mazurczyk, O. Sinkin, D. G. Foursa, A. Pilipetskii, G. Mohs, and N. S. Bergano, “200 Gb/s and dual wavelength 400 Gb/s transmission over transpacific distance at 6.0 b/s/Hz spectral efficiency,” accepted to J. Lightwave Technol.

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Figures (6)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1 Schematic of de-correlated 3 rail 152x200 Gb/s Nyquist PDM 16QAM transmitter, circulating loop test bed and 200/400 Gb/s PDM 16QAM receiver with dual 100 GS/s sampling scopes.
Fig. 2
Fig. 2 Performance (with NLC) vs. transmitter pre emphasis along with noise loaded back to back at 6.0 b/s/Hz SE. Left: 200Gb/s after 9,207 km (17 loops); right: 400Gb/s after 8,124 km (15 loops)
Fig. 3
Fig. 3 Transmission performance for three channels at nominal power.
Fig. 4
Fig. 4 Received OSNR (in 0.1nm RBW) and optical spectrum after 9,748 km.
Fig. 5
Fig. 5 200 Gb/s (152x256 Gb/s) performance at 6.0 b/s/Hz after 9,748 km.
Fig. 6
Fig. 6 400 Gb/s (76x512 Gb/s) performance at 6.0 b/s/Hz after 8,665 km.

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