Abstract

Polarization dependent transmission through thin gold films bearing arrays of elliptical nanopores and assembled at transparent substrates is explored. Far field transmission spectra with incident light polarized along the short and long axis of the ellipses show asymmetric peaks. Near-field finite difference time domain simulated electric field profiles suggest these features are related to Fano resonances between the (± 1, 0) Surface Plasmon Polariton mode and the ( ± 1, 0) Rayleigh Anomaly. The unique spectral signature of these samples makes them attractive for visible and near infrared tags for anti-counterfeiting applications.

© 2012 OSA

1. Introduction

Plasmonic nanostructures have recently attracted considerable interest due to their potential in photonic applications. Since Ebbesen et al [1] first observed Enhanced Optical Transmission (EOT) at specific wavelengths through sub-wavelength pores in metallic structures, much attention has been dedicated to these nanostructures. It has been shown that the observed transmission spectrum is dependent on the type and thickness of metal, the periodicity of the pattern, and the shape and orientation of the nanopore [24]. So far, numerous applications have been demonstrated based on EOT, including optical filtering [58] and biosensing [912]. A further benefit accruing from the use of nanopore arrays is that the shape anisotropy of elliptical or rectangular nanopores induces polarization sensitive transmission spectra in both individual nanopores and nanopore arrays, from the visible to the mid-infrared range [1323]. Very recently, it was shown that this polarization could be used to tune the optical response in the visible spectral region when using arrays of crossed shaped nanoantennas, and that these devices had potential as encrypted tags for security application [24].

Recently, we developed a rapid facile approach for fabrication of elliptical nanopores in gold films using de-focused ion beam [25]. In this work, we present the polarization dependence of light transmitted in both the visible and near infrared (NIR) through an array of elliptical nanopores in a thin gold film assembled at a glass substrate. A very strong spectral anisotropy was observed for spectra acquired using polarized excitation light along both the short and long axis of the ellipses showing distinct features, such as sharp peaks and spectral minima, in the 600-1200nm regions. 3D Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) simulations suggested that the observed peaks were related to Fano resonances between the (± 1, 0) Rayleigh Anomaly (RA) and the ( ± 1, 0) Surface Plasmon Polariton (SPP) mode on the Au/glass interface. Finally we demonstrated the potential use of such sample as visible and NIR tag for anti-counterfeiting applications.

2. Experiment

2.1. Electron beam lithography fabrication

Patches of 60 µm × 60 µm periodic nanopore arrays were fabricated on thin films of chrome/gold (10nm/50nm) deposited on Si substrate using a focused ion beam (FIB). Elliptical nanopores with diameters of 150 nm and 350 nm were fabricated with a lattice period of 450 nm. The gold film was released from the underlying Si substrate by wet etching the chromium layer (Chrome Etchant Lodyne, Grower Chemicals Ltd.) for 10 minutes. The chip was then immersed into deionized water. The Si substrate sank to the bottom while the Au film floated on the water surface due to surface tension. Using this approach, the highly fragile gold films were easily freed from the silicon substrate in a contactless manner. Finally, the nanostructured film was flow assembled onto a glass microscope slide and allowed to dry for 24 h. After assembly, the film was observed to adhere strongly to the glass substrate via Van Der Waals interactions.

2.2. Optical characterization

To undertake spectral characterization, light from a xenon arc lamp was collimated and passed through a Glan-Thompson polarizer prior to illuminate the sample at normal incidence. Light transmitted through a nanopore array was collected using a 50x objective, spatially filtered using a pin hole and focused onto a fiber bundle. Transmission spectra were recorded using a monochromator coupled to a PMT (visible) or a germanium detector (NIR). All recorded spectra were normalized with respect to a glass substrate. Real color images were acquired using a commercial color CMOS chip with integration time of 1ms. NIR images were acquired by adding 750 nm long path filters in the collection path with an integration time of 60 ms.

2.3. FDTD simulations of nanopore arrays

3D-FDTD simulations were undertaken using JFDTD3D [26]. The computational domain was chosen to be 450x450x1600 nm3 and the mesh was 5 nm in all directions. Periodic boundary conditions (450 nm) in the x and y directions were employed to simulate an infinite square array. Permittivity of gold was modeled using a Drude plus two-pole Lorentz model. Perfectly Matching Layers (PML) boundary conditions were imposed in the z direction in order to avoid reflections from the edges of the computational window. Transmission spectra were deconvoluted by Fourier transforming the simulated electric and magnetic fields on a surface above the gold followed by construction of the surface integral of the outward Poynting vector.

3. Results and Discussion

3.1. Experimental observations in the nanopore arrays

Figure 1(a) shows a scanning electron microscope image of an elliptical nanopore array fabricated using FIB in a thin gold film deposited on a Si substrate; inset, the surface of the film appears smooth and the edges of the nanopore sharp and well defined. Figure 1(b) shows an atomic force micrograph of a gold film bearing a nanopore array following its transfer by assembly onto a transparent substrate. Despite being only 50 nm in thickness, the film was sufficiently strong to survive the transfer. Two further benefits of the lift-off technique include: firstly the removal of the chromium adhesion layer that would otherwise dampen plasmonic effect on the Au-glass interface [27]. Secondly, assembly of a film onto a new pristine substrate removes the possibility of substrate damage, arising during the FIB milling process, from interfering with optical transmission.

 

Fig. 1 SEM (a) and AFM (b) micrographs of the array of elliptical nanopores in a thin gold film. Insets: higher resolution image of four nanopores Lattice period is 450nm, nanopore dimensions are 350x150nm with orientation angle of 45° with respect to the array edge. Measured (black curve) and FDTD simulated (red curve) far-field transmission spectrum with light polarized across (c) the short and (d) the long axis of the ellipses. Blue curves show the transmission spectrum through an un-patterned gold film

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Figures 1(c)-1(d) show far-field transmission spectra with light polarized across and along the long axis of the ellipses, respectively. Avery good agreement between the simulated (red) and experimental (black) data, both in terms of peak position and overall trend was observed. The discrepancy in the relative intensity may be attributed to minor imperfections in the nanopore structure such as errors in pore dimension and sharpness of the pore edges or, to imperfections in the Drude-Lorentz model. All spectra exhibited a broad peak around λ = 490 nm, with a transmission of 20-35% (simulation and experiment, respectively). This peak can also be found in the spectrum of a plain gold film and corresponds to direct transmission (intraband transition) for gold and occurs irrespective of the incident polarization see Figs. 1(c)-1(d) [28]. However, at wavelengths above 490 nm the recorded spectra differ significantly for the two polarization states.

When the incident light is polarized along the short axis of an ellipse, two peaks were observed (Fig. 1(c)), a broad peak in the near infrared at λ = 980 nm and a sharp, asymmetric peak at λ = 690 nm. On either side of this sharp peak, transmission reaches zero at λ = 735 nm and λ = 595 nm. These dips in the transmission spectrum can be correlated to the (1, 0)Glass and (1, 1)Glass Surface Plasmon Polariton (SPP) mode on the glass/metal interface, respectively. For normal incidence of light onto a square-symmetry periodic lattice, SPP modes occur at the wavelengths satisfying a two-dimensional grating coupling condition for surface plasmon [29, 30] (this equation is implicit as εAu is dependent on λ):

λSPP=P(nx2+ny2)1/2(εAuεεAu+ε)1/2
where P is the periodicity of the hole structure, nx and ny integer numbers indicating the SPP mode order, εAu and ε the permittivity’s of gold and external dielectric, respectively. Table 1 shows the spectral positions of the predicted SPP modes for the glass/metal and metal/air interfaces with P = 450nm. As can be seen in this table, the predicted (1, 0)Glass and (1, 1)Glass occur at 721 nm and 573 nm, respectively, in close proximity to the 735nm and 595nm dips observed.

Tables Icon

Table 1. Solutions of Eqs. (1) and (2) predicting the spectral positions of Surface Plasmon Polariton and Rayleigh Anomaly on the glass/metal and metal/ air interfaces.

The peak at λ = 690 nm might also be associated with a Rayleigh anomaly. Rayleigh anomalies (RA) describe light waves diffracted to move in the plane of the surface and occur at wavelengths satisfying:

λRA=P(nx2+ny2)1/2ε
As can be seen in Table 1, one can predict a (1,0)Glass RA at λ = 675 nm, close to the λ = 690 nm peak.

When the incident light was polarized along the long axis of an ellipse, a shoulder at λ = 570 nm in the low energy side of the 490 nm peak and a very sharp, asymmetric peak at λ = 735 nm with an associated minimum at 715 nm was observed see Fig. 1(d). This minimum value is in close spectral proximity to the aforementioned (1, 0)Glass SPP. The unusual asymmetric shape of the λ = 735 nm peak is indicative of a Fano resonance. Fano resonances are characteristic of systems where two transmission pathways interfere, a resonant and a non-resonant one, and have been observed in a variety of plasmonic nanostructures [3135].

3.2. FDTD simulated near field profiles

To further understand the origins of the observed peaks, frequency-resolved near-field profiles were simulated at the wavelengths of interest. The top panel (Fig. 2(a) ) shows the plan view, on the glass side, of the electric field intensity at 960 nm when irradiated with light polarized along the short axis. The observed symmetric dipole-like distribution with maximum intensities in the direction of the incident field corresponds to the transverse Localized Surface Plasmon resonance (tLSP) of the nanopore. Figure 2(a) (bottom panel) shows a side elevation view of the electric field distribution, which is observed to be bound and concentrated on the top and bottom surfaces of the nanopore.

 

Fig. 2 FDTD calculated frequency-resolved |Ez|2 profiles at (a) λ = 960nm, (b) λ = 690nm (c) λ = 735 nm and (d) λ = 595 nm with incident light polarized along the short axis of the ellipses. Top panels show near field profiles 10 nm below the Au film and bottom shows cross section across the middle of the ellipses. The hole is centered at the origin, and the film boundaries are outlined in white.

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The top panel of Fig. 2(b) shows the plan view, on the glass side, of the electric field intensity distribution at 690 nm when irradiated with light polarized along the short axis. At this wavelength, the electric field is not bound to the rim of the nanohole anymore, but is instead concentrated in the area in between two adjacent holes and is thus supported by the film, confirming its SPP nature as suggested previously. While the excitation lies in the (1, −1) direction, it excites the (1, 0)Glass SPP mode. This is possible because the electric field vector of the incident light has a component in the direction of SPP propagation, i.e., EkSP0, with kSP the wavevector of the SPP [36]. As the periodicity is the same in the x and y direction, both the (1, 0)Glass and the (0, 1)Glass modes are excited, explaining why the distribution is symmetric with respect to the long axis of the ellipse. The side elevation view of the electric field distribution (Fig. 2(b)) clearly shows that the light is escaping into the substrate from the Au-glass interface, which is a signature of a Rayleigh anomaly [37]. The interference between the (1, 0)Glass SPP and the (1, 0) Rayleigh anomaly then results in the Fano interference, characterized by the dip observed at 735mn in Fig. 1(c).

Figure 2(c) shows the electric field profile on the glass side at the minimum in transmission at 735nm. In the top panel, it can be seen that the field profile possesses a hybrid character, being both localized to the rim of the ellipse and propagating along the interface in the (1, −1) direction. This mode thus results from the combination of the tLSP of the nanohole and the (1, 0)Glass SPP at 690nm.

The side elevation shows the intensity on the air/metal interface is very weak, suggesting there is a destructive interference between the tLSP and the (1, 0)Glass SPP at this wavelength [21, 37]. Also note that on the glass/metal interface, the electric field is also starting to escape from the metal film, marking the onset of the RA.

Finally, Fig. 2(d) shows the electric field on the glass side at the second minimum at 595nm. Here again, the distribution is hybrid, being both bound to the edge of the hole, corresponding to the tLSP and also propagating in the (1,-1) direction, corresponding to the (1,-1)Glass. SPP [38]. In a manner similar to the minimum at 735nm, the field profile suggest a destructive interference between the tLSP and the (1, −1)Glass SPP.

Figure 3 shows, of the electric field profiles, on the glass side, when irradiated with light polarized along the long axis. The top panel of Fig. 3(a) shows the electric field profile at λ = 735mn where a dipolar symmetric profile is observed with the maximum intensity in the (1,1) direction. This profile can be attributed to a combination of the longitudinal Localized Surface Plasmon resonance (lLSP) of the nanopore and the (1, 0)Glass SPP. As for the peak at 690nm in Fig. 3(b), the side elevation view of the electric field distribution of the bottom panel clearly shows that the light is escaping into the substrate from the Au-glass interface, suggesting a Rayleigh Anomaly.

 

Fig. 3 FDTD calculated frequency-resolved |Ez|2 profiles at (a) λ = 735nm, (b) λ = 715nm with incident light polarized along the long axis of the ellipses. Top panels show near field profiles 10 nm below the Au film and bottom shows cross section across the middle of the ellipses. The hole is centered at the origin, and the film boundaries are outlined in white.

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The top panel (Fig. 3(b)) also shows the profile at the minimum at λ = 715mn, which is similar, however a lot less intense, to the one at λ = 735mn. As in Fig. 2(c), the side elevation shows the intensity on the air/metal interface is very weak, suggesting there is a destructive interference between the lLSP and the (1, 0)Glass SPP at this wavelength. Also note that on the glass/metal interface, the electric field is also starting to escape from the metal film, here again marking the onset of the RA.

3.3 Application as anti-counterfeiting tag

Polarized nanopore arrays have potential applicability for use in anti-counterfeiting applications, such as high end product labeling, drug packaging etc. Figure 4(a) demonstrates the concept of these devices where the lLSP and tLSP plasmon resonances have different frequencies in the visible and NIR regions of the spectrum. The CIE 1931 color coordinates of the nanopore arrays measured for different polarization angles exhibited different values ranging from (0.214, 0.306) to (0.317, 0.361). Real color transmission images obtained using incident white light polarized along and across the long axis have were recorded, see Fig. 4(b). The array appears white under polarization along the long axis (CIE coordinate 0.317, 0.361) and turns to sky blue (CIE coordinate 0.214, 0.306) as the polarization (or, conversely, the sample) is rotated by 90° such that light is polarized along the short axis Under the same conditions, the image turns from bright to dark in the NIR observed when a 700nm long path filter is placed in the optical path. This NIR spectral region is outside of the sensitivity of human eyes but may be resolved by a commercial CMOS camera. The inclusion of NIR spectral features adds a further level of security to an encrypted tag while the micron size of these arrays renders them difficult to see by the naked eye. Figures 4 (c) and 4(d) show the measured polarization dependence of the different plasmonic peaks. Spectra recorded by illuminating at angles other than along the short or the long axis could be related to a linear combination of these two spectra, suggesting the observed anisotropy was dictated by the shape of the nanopore, and not by the symmetry of the repetition pattern as previously reported [13, 23, 27]. The peaks at 570nm and 750nm are in phase and in quadrature with the 690nm peak. When the polarization of the incident light is parallel to the long axis, the lLSP intensity dominates and the tLSP is barely observable. In contrast, when the incident light is polarized parallel to the short axis the tLSP intensity dominates.

 

Fig. 4 (a) illustration of the polarization-dependant color transmission with mapping of spectra to points on the CIE 1931 coordinates showing blue to white light tuning (b) Real color transmission images showing dual visible-invisible tagging. Top: no filter and light polarized along (white) and across (blue) the long axis of the ellipse. Bottom: same images through 700nm long path filters (c) Polarized transmission spectra acquired every 30°. (d) Transmission intensity vs. polarization angle for wavelength of 570, 690 and 750nm. Solid lines are cos2 θ fit.

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Simultaneously combining all these features (polarization dependent visible and invisible transmission – simultaneous white/bright under one polarization state and blue/dark by 90° rotation) in a security label would be quite unique and would be very challenging to illegally reproduce. Moreover, the transmission spectra could be further tuned by changing nanopore shapes, dimension or arrangement and metal used. Nanoimprinting or transfer printing could be used to make these samples in a scalable and cost-effective way.

4. Conclusion

In summary, arrays of elliptical nanopore in thin gold films have been fabricated by focused ion beam milling and assembled onto a glass substrate. These samples showed strong optical anisotropy, and their transmission spectra showed sharp asymmetric features. Optical response of the samples was simulated by FDTD and a good agreement was found between the simulated and experimental data. Analysis of the simulated near-field profile suggested the observed peaks were related to Fano resonances between the ( ± 1, 0) Surface Plasmon Polariton mode and the ( ± 1, 0) Rayleigh Anomaly. Polarized transmission images acquired using commercial CMOS color chip showed simultaneous eye visible and eye invisible anisotropies. The optical signature of these arrays is quite unique and would be difficult to reproduce using other techniques, making them attractive for security tag applications.

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by the EU-funded project Phast-ID (FP7-ICT-2009-5-258238) and Science Foundation Ireland under the Research Frontiers Programme (SFI/09/RFP/CAP2455).

References and links

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5. W. L. Barnes, A. Dereux, and T. W. Ebbesen, “Surface plasmon subwavelength optics,” Nature 424(6950), 824–830 (2003). [CrossRef]   [PubMed]  

6. Q. Chen and D. R. S. Cumming, “High transmission and low color cross-talk plasmonic color filters using triangular-lattice hole arrays in aluminum films,” Opt. Express 18(13), 14056–14062 (2010). [CrossRef]   [PubMed]  

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9. R. Gordon, D. Sinton, K. L. Kavanagh, and A. G. Brolo, “A new generation of sensors based on extraordinary optical transmission,” Acc. Chem. Res. 41(8), 1049–1057 (2008). [CrossRef]   [PubMed]  

10. A. A. Yanik, M. Huang, O. Kamohara, A. Artar, T. W. Geisbert, J. H. Connor, and H. Altug, “An optofluidic nanoplasmonic biosensor for direct detection of live viruses from biological media,” Nano Lett. 10(12), 4962–4969 (2010). [CrossRef]   [PubMed]  

11. A. Lesuffleur, H. Im, N. C. Lindquist, and S.-H. Oh, “Periodic nanohole arrays with shape-enhanced plasmon resonance as real-time biosensors,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 90(24), 243110 (2007). [CrossRef]  

12. A. A. Yanik, A. E. Cetin, M. Huang, A. Artar, S. H. Mousavi, A. Khanikaev, J. H. Connor, G. Shvets, and H. Altug, “Seeing protein monolayers with naked eye through plasmonic Fano resonances,” Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 108(29), 11784–11789 (2011). [CrossRef]   [PubMed]  

13. A. Degiron and T. W. Ebbesen, “The role of localized surface plasmon modes in the enhanced transmission of periodic subwavelength apertures,” J. Opt. A, Pure Appl. Opt. 7(2), S90–S96 (2005). [CrossRef]  

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References

  • View by:
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  1. T. W. Ebbesen, H. J. Lezec, H. F. Ghaemi, T. Thio, and P. A. Wolff, “Extraordinary optical transmission through sub-wavelength hole arrays,” Nature391(6668), 667–669 (1998).
    [CrossRef]
  2. M. Najiminaini, F. Vasefi, B. Kaminska, and J. J. L. Carson, “Experimental and numerical analysis on the optical resonance transmission properties of nano-hole arrays,” Opt. Express18(21), 22255–22270 (2010).
    [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  3. S. G. Rodrigo, F. J. García-Vidal, and L. Martín-Moreno, “Influence of material properties on extraordinary optical transmission through hole arrays,” Phys. Rev. B77(7), 075401 (2008).
    [CrossRef]
  4. T. Sannomiya, O. Scholder, K. Jefimovs, C. Hafner, and A. B. Dahlin, “Investigation of Plasmon Resonances in Metal Films with Nanohole Arrays for Biosensing Applications,” Small7(12), 1653–1663 (2011).
    [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  5. W. L. Barnes, A. Dereux, and T. W. Ebbesen, “Surface plasmon subwavelength optics,” Nature424(6950), 824–830 (2003).
    [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  6. Q. Chen and D. R. S. Cumming, “High transmission and low color cross-talk plasmonic color filters using triangular-lattice hole arrays in aluminum films,” Opt. Express18(13), 14056–14062 (2010).
    [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  7. H.-S. Lee, Y.-T. Yoon, S. S. Lee, S.-H. Kim, and K.-D. Lee, “Color filter based on a subwavelength patterned metal grating,” Opt. Express15(23), 15457–15463 (2007).
    [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  8. S. Yokogawa, S. P. Burgos, and H. A. Atwater, “Plasmonic color filters for CMOS image sensor applications,” Nano Lett.12(8), 4349–4354 (2012).
    [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  9. R. Gordon, D. Sinton, K. L. Kavanagh, and A. G. Brolo, “A new generation of sensors based on extraordinary optical transmission,” Acc. Chem. Res.41(8), 1049–1057 (2008).
    [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  10. A. A. Yanik, M. Huang, O. Kamohara, A. Artar, T. W. Geisbert, J. H. Connor, and H. Altug, “An optofluidic nanoplasmonic biosensor for direct detection of live viruses from biological media,” Nano Lett.10(12), 4962–4969 (2010).
    [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  11. A. Lesuffleur, H. Im, N. C. Lindquist, and S.-H. Oh, “Periodic nanohole arrays with shape-enhanced plasmon resonance as real-time biosensors,” Appl. Phys. Lett.90(24), 243110 (2007).
    [CrossRef]
  12. A. A. Yanik, A. E. Cetin, M. Huang, A. Artar, S. H. Mousavi, A. Khanikaev, J. H. Connor, G. Shvets, and H. Altug, “Seeing protein monolayers with naked eye through plasmonic Fano resonances,” Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.108(29), 11784–11789 (2011).
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  14. A. Degiron, H. J. Lezec, N. Yamamoto, and T. W. Ebbesen, “Optical transmission properties of a single subwavelength aperture in a real metal,” Opt. Commun.239(1-3), 61–66 (2004).
    [CrossRef]
  15. J. Elliott, I. I. Smolyaninov, N. I. Zheludev, and A. V. Zayats, “Polarization control of optical transmission of a periodic array of elliptical nanoholes in a metal film,” Opt. Lett.29(12), 1414–1416 (2004).
    [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  16. K. J. K. Koerkamp, S. Enoch, F. B. Segerink, N. F. van Hulst, and L. Kuipers, “Strong influence of hole shape on extraordinary transmission through periodic arrays of subwavelength holes,” Phys. Rev. Lett.92(18), 183901 (2004).
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  17. J. Li, H. Iu, J. T. K. Wan, and H. C. Ong, “The plasmonic properties of elliptical metallic hole arrays,” Appl. Phys. Lett.94(3), 033101 (2009).
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  18. X. F. Ren, P. Zhang, G. P. Guo, Y. F. Huang, Z. W. Wang, and G. C. Guo, “Polarization properties of subwavelength hole arrays consisting of rectangular holes,” Appl. Phys. B-Lasers Opt.91(3-4), 601–604 (2008).
    [CrossRef]
  19. B. Sepúlveda, Y. Alaverdyan, J. Alegret, M. Käll, and P. Johansson, “Shape effects in the localized surface plasmon resonance of single nanoholes in thin metal films,” Opt. Express16(8), 5609–5616 (2008).
    [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  20. K. L. van der Molen, K. J. Klein Koerkamp, S. Enoch, F. B. Segerink, N. F. van Hulst, and L. Kuipers, “Role of shape and localized resonances in extraordinary transmission through periodic arrays of subwavelength holes: Experiment and theory,” Phys. Rev. B72(4), 045421 (2005).
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  21. S. Wu, Q. J. Wang, X. G. Yin, J. Q. Li, D. Zhu, S. Q. Liu, and Y. Y. Zhu, “Enhanced optical transmission: Role of the localized surface plasmon,” Appl. Phys. Lett.93(10), 101113 (2008).
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  23. R. Gordon, A. G. Brolo, A. McKinnon, A. Rajora, B. Leathem, and K. L. Kavanagh, “Strong polarization in the optical transmission through elliptical nanohole arrays,” Phys. Rev. Lett.92(3), 037401 (2004).
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  24. T. Ellenbogen, K. Seo, and K. B. Crozier, “Chromatic Plasmonic Polarizers for Active Visible Color Filtering and Polarimetry,” Nano Lett.12(2), 1026–1031 (2012).
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  28. H. Gao, J. Henzie, and T. W. Odom, “Direct Evidence for Surface Plasmon-Mediated Enhanced Light Transmission through Metallic Nanohole Arrays,” Nano Lett.6(9), 2104–2108 (2006).
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  34. M. Rahmani, B. Lukiyanchuk, B. Ng, A. Tavakkoli K. G, Y. F. Liew, and M. H. Hong, “Generation of pronounced Fano resonances and tuning of subwavelength spatial light distribution in plasmonic pentamers,” Opt. Express19(6), 4949–4956 (2011).
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  38. P. Lalanne, J. C. Rodier, and J. P. Hugonin, “Surface plasmons of metallic surfaces perforated by nanohole arrays,” J. Opt. A, Pure Appl. Opt.7(8), 422–426 (2005).
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2012 (3)

S. Yokogawa, S. P. Burgos, and H. A. Atwater, “Plasmonic color filters for CMOS image sensor applications,” Nano Lett.12(8), 4349–4354 (2012).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

T. Ellenbogen, K. Seo, and K. B. Crozier, “Chromatic Plasmonic Polarizers for Active Visible Color Filtering and Polarimetry,” Nano Lett.12(2), 1026–1031 (2012).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

Y. Francescato, V. Giannini, and S. A. Maier, “Plasmonic Systems Unveiled by Fano Resonances,” ACS Nano6(2), 1830–1838 (2012).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

2011 (4)

P. Lovera, D. Jones, and A. O’Riordan, “Elliptical nanohole array in thin gold film as micrometer sized optical filter set for fluorescent-labelled assays,” Journal of Physics: Conference Series307, 012006 (2011).
[CrossRef]

A. A. Yanik, A. E. Cetin, M. Huang, A. Artar, S. H. Mousavi, A. Khanikaev, J. H. Connor, G. Shvets, and H. Altug, “Seeing protein monolayers with naked eye through plasmonic Fano resonances,” Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.108(29), 11784–11789 (2011).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

T. Sannomiya, O. Scholder, K. Jefimovs, C. Hafner, and A. B. Dahlin, “Investigation of Plasmon Resonances in Metal Films with Nanohole Arrays for Biosensing Applications,” Small7(12), 1653–1663 (2011).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

M. Rahmani, B. Lukiyanchuk, B. Ng, A. Tavakkoli K. G, Y. F. Liew, and M. H. Hong, “Generation of pronounced Fano resonances and tuning of subwavelength spatial light distribution in plasmonic pentamers,” Opt. Express19(6), 4949–4956 (2011).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

2010 (6)

A. A. Yanik, M. Huang, O. Kamohara, A. Artar, T. W. Geisbert, J. H. Connor, and H. Altug, “An optofluidic nanoplasmonic biosensor for direct detection of live viruses from biological media,” Nano Lett.10(12), 4962–4969 (2010).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

B. Luk’yanchuk, N. I. Zheludev, S. A. Maier, N. J. Halas, P. Nordlander, H. Giessen, and C. T. Chong, “The Fano resonance in plasmonic nanostructures and metamaterials,” Nat. Mater.9(9), 707–715 (2010).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

A. E. Miroshnichenko, S. Flach, and Y. S. Kivshar, “Fano resonances in nanoscale structures,” Rev. Mod. Phys.82(3), 2257–2298 (2010).
[CrossRef]

Y. Sonnefraud, N. Verellen, H. Sobhani, G. A. E. Vandenbosch, V. V. Moshchalkov, P. Van Dorpe, P. Nordlander, and S. A. Maier, “Experimental Realization of Subradiant, Superradiant, and Fano Resonances in Ring/Disk Plasmonic Nanocavities,” ACS Nano4(3), 1664–1670 (2010).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

Q. Chen and D. R. S. Cumming, “High transmission and low color cross-talk plasmonic color filters using triangular-lattice hole arrays in aluminum films,” Opt. Express18(13), 14056–14062 (2010).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

M. Najiminaini, F. Vasefi, B. Kaminska, and J. J. L. Carson, “Experimental and numerical analysis on the optical resonance transmission properties of nano-hole arrays,” Opt. Express18(21), 22255–22270 (2010).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

2009 (2)

A. A. Yanik, R. Adato, S. Erramilli, and H. Altug, “Hybridized nanocavities as single-polarized plasmonic antennas,” Opt. Express17(23), 20900–20910 (2009).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

J. Li, H. Iu, J. T. K. Wan, and H. C. Ong, “The plasmonic properties of elliptical metallic hole arrays,” Appl. Phys. Lett.94(3), 033101 (2009).
[CrossRef]

2008 (5)

X. F. Ren, P. Zhang, G. P. Guo, Y. F. Huang, Z. W. Wang, and G. C. Guo, “Polarization properties of subwavelength hole arrays consisting of rectangular holes,” Appl. Phys. B-Lasers Opt.91(3-4), 601–604 (2008).
[CrossRef]

S. G. Rodrigo, F. J. García-Vidal, and L. Martín-Moreno, “Influence of material properties on extraordinary optical transmission through hole arrays,” Phys. Rev. B77(7), 075401 (2008).
[CrossRef]

R. Gordon, D. Sinton, K. L. Kavanagh, and A. G. Brolo, “A new generation of sensors based on extraordinary optical transmission,” Acc. Chem. Res.41(8), 1049–1057 (2008).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

B. Sepúlveda, Y. Alaverdyan, J. Alegret, M. Käll, and P. Johansson, “Shape effects in the localized surface plasmon resonance of single nanoholes in thin metal films,” Opt. Express16(8), 5609–5616 (2008).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

S. Wu, Q. J. Wang, X. G. Yin, J. Q. Li, D. Zhu, S. Q. Liu, and Y. Y. Zhu, “Enhanced optical transmission: Role of the localized surface plasmon,” Appl. Phys. Lett.93(10), 101113 (2008).
[CrossRef]

2007 (2)

H.-S. Lee, Y.-T. Yoon, S. S. Lee, S.-H. Kim, and K.-D. Lee, “Color filter based on a subwavelength patterned metal grating,” Opt. Express15(23), 15457–15463 (2007).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

A. Lesuffleur, H. Im, N. C. Lindquist, and S.-H. Oh, “Periodic nanohole arrays with shape-enhanced plasmon resonance as real-time biosensors,” Appl. Phys. Lett.90(24), 243110 (2007).
[CrossRef]

2006 (1)

H. Gao, J. Henzie, and T. W. Odom, “Direct Evidence for Surface Plasmon-Mediated Enhanced Light Transmission through Metallic Nanohole Arrays,” Nano Lett.6(9), 2104–2108 (2006).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

2005 (5)

R. Gordon, M. Hughes, B. Leathem, K. L. Kavanagh, and A. G. Brolo, “Basis and lattice polarization mechanisms for light transmission through nanohole arrays in a metal film,” Nano Lett.5(7), 1243–1246 (2005).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

A. Degiron and T. W. Ebbesen, “The role of localized surface plasmon modes in the enhanced transmission of periodic subwavelength apertures,” J. Opt. A, Pure Appl. Opt.7(2), S90–S96 (2005).
[CrossRef]

S.-H. Chang, S. Gray, and G. Schatz, “Surface plasmon generation and light transmission by isolated nanoholes and arrays of nanoholes in thin metal films,” Opt. Express13(8), 3150–3165 (2005).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

P. Lalanne, J. C. Rodier, and J. P. Hugonin, “Surface plasmons of metallic surfaces perforated by nanohole arrays,” J. Opt. A, Pure Appl. Opt.7(8), 422–426 (2005).
[CrossRef]

K. L. van der Molen, K. J. Klein Koerkamp, S. Enoch, F. B. Segerink, N. F. van Hulst, and L. Kuipers, “Role of shape and localized resonances in extraordinary transmission through periodic arrays of subwavelength holes: Experiment and theory,” Phys. Rev. B72(4), 045421 (2005).
[CrossRef]

2004 (5)

J. Elliott, I. I. Smolyaninov, N. I. Zheludev, and A. V. Zayats, “Wavelength dependent birefringence of surface plasmon polaritonic crystals,” Phys. Rev. B70(23), 233403 (2004).
[CrossRef]

J. Elliott, I. I. Smolyaninov, N. I. Zheludev, and A. V. Zayats, “Polarization control of optical transmission of a periodic array of elliptical nanoholes in a metal film,” Opt. Lett.29(12), 1414–1416 (2004).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

A. Degiron, H. J. Lezec, N. Yamamoto, and T. W. Ebbesen, “Optical transmission properties of a single subwavelength aperture in a real metal,” Opt. Commun.239(1-3), 61–66 (2004).
[CrossRef]

K. J. K. Koerkamp, S. Enoch, F. B. Segerink, N. F. van Hulst, and L. Kuipers, “Strong influence of hole shape on extraordinary transmission through periodic arrays of subwavelength holes,” Phys. Rev. Lett.92(18), 183901 (2004).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

R. Gordon, A. G. Brolo, A. McKinnon, A. Rajora, B. Leathem, and K. L. Kavanagh, “Strong polarization in the optical transmission through elliptical nanohole arrays,” Phys. Rev. Lett.92(3), 037401 (2004).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

2003 (1)

W. L. Barnes, A. Dereux, and T. W. Ebbesen, “Surface plasmon subwavelength optics,” Nature424(6950), 824–830 (2003).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

1998 (2)

H. F. Ghaemi, T. Thio, D. E. Grupp, T. W. Ebbesen, and H. J. Lezec, “Surface plasmons enhance optical transmission through subwavelength holes,” Phys. Rev. B58(11), 6779–6782 (1998).
[CrossRef]

T. W. Ebbesen, H. J. Lezec, H. F. Ghaemi, T. Thio, and P. A. Wolff, “Extraordinary optical transmission through sub-wavelength hole arrays,” Nature391(6668), 667–669 (1998).
[CrossRef]

Adato, R.

Alaverdyan, Y.

Alegret, J.

Altug, H.

A. A. Yanik, A. E. Cetin, M. Huang, A. Artar, S. H. Mousavi, A. Khanikaev, J. H. Connor, G. Shvets, and H. Altug, “Seeing protein monolayers with naked eye through plasmonic Fano resonances,” Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.108(29), 11784–11789 (2011).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

A. A. Yanik, M. Huang, O. Kamohara, A. Artar, T. W. Geisbert, J. H. Connor, and H. Altug, “An optofluidic nanoplasmonic biosensor for direct detection of live viruses from biological media,” Nano Lett.10(12), 4962–4969 (2010).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

A. A. Yanik, R. Adato, S. Erramilli, and H. Altug, “Hybridized nanocavities as single-polarized plasmonic antennas,” Opt. Express17(23), 20900–20910 (2009).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

Artar, A.

A. A. Yanik, A. E. Cetin, M. Huang, A. Artar, S. H. Mousavi, A. Khanikaev, J. H. Connor, G. Shvets, and H. Altug, “Seeing protein monolayers with naked eye through plasmonic Fano resonances,” Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.108(29), 11784–11789 (2011).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

A. A. Yanik, M. Huang, O. Kamohara, A. Artar, T. W. Geisbert, J. H. Connor, and H. Altug, “An optofluidic nanoplasmonic biosensor for direct detection of live viruses from biological media,” Nano Lett.10(12), 4962–4969 (2010).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

Atwater, H. A.

S. Yokogawa, S. P. Burgos, and H. A. Atwater, “Plasmonic color filters for CMOS image sensor applications,” Nano Lett.12(8), 4349–4354 (2012).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

Barnes, W. L.

W. L. Barnes, A. Dereux, and T. W. Ebbesen, “Surface plasmon subwavelength optics,” Nature424(6950), 824–830 (2003).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

Brolo, A. G.

R. Gordon, D. Sinton, K. L. Kavanagh, and A. G. Brolo, “A new generation of sensors based on extraordinary optical transmission,” Acc. Chem. Res.41(8), 1049–1057 (2008).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

R. Gordon, M. Hughes, B. Leathem, K. L. Kavanagh, and A. G. Brolo, “Basis and lattice polarization mechanisms for light transmission through nanohole arrays in a metal film,” Nano Lett.5(7), 1243–1246 (2005).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

R. Gordon, A. G. Brolo, A. McKinnon, A. Rajora, B. Leathem, and K. L. Kavanagh, “Strong polarization in the optical transmission through elliptical nanohole arrays,” Phys. Rev. Lett.92(3), 037401 (2004).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

Burgos, S. P.

S. Yokogawa, S. P. Burgos, and H. A. Atwater, “Plasmonic color filters for CMOS image sensor applications,” Nano Lett.12(8), 4349–4354 (2012).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

Carson, J. J. L.

Cetin, A. E.

A. A. Yanik, A. E. Cetin, M. Huang, A. Artar, S. H. Mousavi, A. Khanikaev, J. H. Connor, G. Shvets, and H. Altug, “Seeing protein monolayers with naked eye through plasmonic Fano resonances,” Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.108(29), 11784–11789 (2011).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

Chang, S.-H.

Chen, Q.

Chong, C. T.

B. Luk’yanchuk, N. I. Zheludev, S. A. Maier, N. J. Halas, P. Nordlander, H. Giessen, and C. T. Chong, “The Fano resonance in plasmonic nanostructures and metamaterials,” Nat. Mater.9(9), 707–715 (2010).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

Connor, J. H.

A. A. Yanik, A. E. Cetin, M. Huang, A. Artar, S. H. Mousavi, A. Khanikaev, J. H. Connor, G. Shvets, and H. Altug, “Seeing protein monolayers with naked eye through plasmonic Fano resonances,” Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.108(29), 11784–11789 (2011).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

A. A. Yanik, M. Huang, O. Kamohara, A. Artar, T. W. Geisbert, J. H. Connor, and H. Altug, “An optofluidic nanoplasmonic biosensor for direct detection of live viruses from biological media,” Nano Lett.10(12), 4962–4969 (2010).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

Crozier, K. B.

T. Ellenbogen, K. Seo, and K. B. Crozier, “Chromatic Plasmonic Polarizers for Active Visible Color Filtering and Polarimetry,” Nano Lett.12(2), 1026–1031 (2012).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

Cumming, D. R. S.

Dahlin, A. B.

T. Sannomiya, O. Scholder, K. Jefimovs, C. Hafner, and A. B. Dahlin, “Investigation of Plasmon Resonances in Metal Films with Nanohole Arrays for Biosensing Applications,” Small7(12), 1653–1663 (2011).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

Degiron, A.

A. Degiron and T. W. Ebbesen, “The role of localized surface plasmon modes in the enhanced transmission of periodic subwavelength apertures,” J. Opt. A, Pure Appl. Opt.7(2), S90–S96 (2005).
[CrossRef]

A. Degiron, H. J. Lezec, N. Yamamoto, and T. W. Ebbesen, “Optical transmission properties of a single subwavelength aperture in a real metal,” Opt. Commun.239(1-3), 61–66 (2004).
[CrossRef]

Dereux, A.

W. L. Barnes, A. Dereux, and T. W. Ebbesen, “Surface plasmon subwavelength optics,” Nature424(6950), 824–830 (2003).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

Ebbesen, T. W.

A. Degiron and T. W. Ebbesen, “The role of localized surface plasmon modes in the enhanced transmission of periodic subwavelength apertures,” J. Opt. A, Pure Appl. Opt.7(2), S90–S96 (2005).
[CrossRef]

A. Degiron, H. J. Lezec, N. Yamamoto, and T. W. Ebbesen, “Optical transmission properties of a single subwavelength aperture in a real metal,” Opt. Commun.239(1-3), 61–66 (2004).
[CrossRef]

W. L. Barnes, A. Dereux, and T. W. Ebbesen, “Surface plasmon subwavelength optics,” Nature424(6950), 824–830 (2003).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

T. W. Ebbesen, H. J. Lezec, H. F. Ghaemi, T. Thio, and P. A. Wolff, “Extraordinary optical transmission through sub-wavelength hole arrays,” Nature391(6668), 667–669 (1998).
[CrossRef]

H. F. Ghaemi, T. Thio, D. E. Grupp, T. W. Ebbesen, and H. J. Lezec, “Surface plasmons enhance optical transmission through subwavelength holes,” Phys. Rev. B58(11), 6779–6782 (1998).
[CrossRef]

Ellenbogen, T.

T. Ellenbogen, K. Seo, and K. B. Crozier, “Chromatic Plasmonic Polarizers for Active Visible Color Filtering and Polarimetry,” Nano Lett.12(2), 1026–1031 (2012).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

Elliott, J.

J. Elliott, I. I. Smolyaninov, N. I. Zheludev, and A. V. Zayats, “Polarization control of optical transmission of a periodic array of elliptical nanoholes in a metal film,” Opt. Lett.29(12), 1414–1416 (2004).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

J. Elliott, I. I. Smolyaninov, N. I. Zheludev, and A. V. Zayats, “Wavelength dependent birefringence of surface plasmon polaritonic crystals,” Phys. Rev. B70(23), 233403 (2004).
[CrossRef]

Enoch, S.

K. L. van der Molen, K. J. Klein Koerkamp, S. Enoch, F. B. Segerink, N. F. van Hulst, and L. Kuipers, “Role of shape and localized resonances in extraordinary transmission through periodic arrays of subwavelength holes: Experiment and theory,” Phys. Rev. B72(4), 045421 (2005).
[CrossRef]

K. J. K. Koerkamp, S. Enoch, F. B. Segerink, N. F. van Hulst, and L. Kuipers, “Strong influence of hole shape on extraordinary transmission through periodic arrays of subwavelength holes,” Phys. Rev. Lett.92(18), 183901 (2004).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

Erramilli, S.

Flach, S.

A. E. Miroshnichenko, S. Flach, and Y. S. Kivshar, “Fano resonances in nanoscale structures,” Rev. Mod. Phys.82(3), 2257–2298 (2010).
[CrossRef]

Francescato, Y.

Y. Francescato, V. Giannini, and S. A. Maier, “Plasmonic Systems Unveiled by Fano Resonances,” ACS Nano6(2), 1830–1838 (2012).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

Gao, H.

H. Gao, J. Henzie, and T. W. Odom, “Direct Evidence for Surface Plasmon-Mediated Enhanced Light Transmission through Metallic Nanohole Arrays,” Nano Lett.6(9), 2104–2108 (2006).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

García-Vidal, F. J.

S. G. Rodrigo, F. J. García-Vidal, and L. Martín-Moreno, “Influence of material properties on extraordinary optical transmission through hole arrays,” Phys. Rev. B77(7), 075401 (2008).
[CrossRef]

Geisbert, T. W.

A. A. Yanik, M. Huang, O. Kamohara, A. Artar, T. W. Geisbert, J. H. Connor, and H. Altug, “An optofluidic nanoplasmonic biosensor for direct detection of live viruses from biological media,” Nano Lett.10(12), 4962–4969 (2010).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

Ghaemi, H. F.

H. F. Ghaemi, T. Thio, D. E. Grupp, T. W. Ebbesen, and H. J. Lezec, “Surface plasmons enhance optical transmission through subwavelength holes,” Phys. Rev. B58(11), 6779–6782 (1998).
[CrossRef]

T. W. Ebbesen, H. J. Lezec, H. F. Ghaemi, T. Thio, and P. A. Wolff, “Extraordinary optical transmission through sub-wavelength hole arrays,” Nature391(6668), 667–669 (1998).
[CrossRef]

Giannini, V.

Y. Francescato, V. Giannini, and S. A. Maier, “Plasmonic Systems Unveiled by Fano Resonances,” ACS Nano6(2), 1830–1838 (2012).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

Giessen, H.

B. Luk’yanchuk, N. I. Zheludev, S. A. Maier, N. J. Halas, P. Nordlander, H. Giessen, and C. T. Chong, “The Fano resonance in plasmonic nanostructures and metamaterials,” Nat. Mater.9(9), 707–715 (2010).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

Gordon, R.

R. Gordon, D. Sinton, K. L. Kavanagh, and A. G. Brolo, “A new generation of sensors based on extraordinary optical transmission,” Acc. Chem. Res.41(8), 1049–1057 (2008).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

R. Gordon, M. Hughes, B. Leathem, K. L. Kavanagh, and A. G. Brolo, “Basis and lattice polarization mechanisms for light transmission through nanohole arrays in a metal film,” Nano Lett.5(7), 1243–1246 (2005).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

R. Gordon, A. G. Brolo, A. McKinnon, A. Rajora, B. Leathem, and K. L. Kavanagh, “Strong polarization in the optical transmission through elliptical nanohole arrays,” Phys. Rev. Lett.92(3), 037401 (2004).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

Gray, S.

Grupp, D. E.

H. F. Ghaemi, T. Thio, D. E. Grupp, T. W. Ebbesen, and H. J. Lezec, “Surface plasmons enhance optical transmission through subwavelength holes,” Phys. Rev. B58(11), 6779–6782 (1998).
[CrossRef]

Guo, G. C.

X. F. Ren, P. Zhang, G. P. Guo, Y. F. Huang, Z. W. Wang, and G. C. Guo, “Polarization properties of subwavelength hole arrays consisting of rectangular holes,” Appl. Phys. B-Lasers Opt.91(3-4), 601–604 (2008).
[CrossRef]

Guo, G. P.

X. F. Ren, P. Zhang, G. P. Guo, Y. F. Huang, Z. W. Wang, and G. C. Guo, “Polarization properties of subwavelength hole arrays consisting of rectangular holes,” Appl. Phys. B-Lasers Opt.91(3-4), 601–604 (2008).
[CrossRef]

Hafner, C.

T. Sannomiya, O. Scholder, K. Jefimovs, C. Hafner, and A. B. Dahlin, “Investigation of Plasmon Resonances in Metal Films with Nanohole Arrays for Biosensing Applications,” Small7(12), 1653–1663 (2011).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

Halas, N. J.

B. Luk’yanchuk, N. I. Zheludev, S. A. Maier, N. J. Halas, P. Nordlander, H. Giessen, and C. T. Chong, “The Fano resonance in plasmonic nanostructures and metamaterials,” Nat. Mater.9(9), 707–715 (2010).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

Henzie, J.

H. Gao, J. Henzie, and T. W. Odom, “Direct Evidence for Surface Plasmon-Mediated Enhanced Light Transmission through Metallic Nanohole Arrays,” Nano Lett.6(9), 2104–2108 (2006).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

Hong, M. H.

Huang, M.

A. A. Yanik, A. E. Cetin, M. Huang, A. Artar, S. H. Mousavi, A. Khanikaev, J. H. Connor, G. Shvets, and H. Altug, “Seeing protein monolayers with naked eye through plasmonic Fano resonances,” Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.108(29), 11784–11789 (2011).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

A. A. Yanik, M. Huang, O. Kamohara, A. Artar, T. W. Geisbert, J. H. Connor, and H. Altug, “An optofluidic nanoplasmonic biosensor for direct detection of live viruses from biological media,” Nano Lett.10(12), 4962–4969 (2010).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

Huang, Y. F.

X. F. Ren, P. Zhang, G. P. Guo, Y. F. Huang, Z. W. Wang, and G. C. Guo, “Polarization properties of subwavelength hole arrays consisting of rectangular holes,” Appl. Phys. B-Lasers Opt.91(3-4), 601–604 (2008).
[CrossRef]

Hughes, M.

R. Gordon, M. Hughes, B. Leathem, K. L. Kavanagh, and A. G. Brolo, “Basis and lattice polarization mechanisms for light transmission through nanohole arrays in a metal film,” Nano Lett.5(7), 1243–1246 (2005).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

Hugonin, J. P.

P. Lalanne, J. C. Rodier, and J. P. Hugonin, “Surface plasmons of metallic surfaces perforated by nanohole arrays,” J. Opt. A, Pure Appl. Opt.7(8), 422–426 (2005).
[CrossRef]

Im, H.

A. Lesuffleur, H. Im, N. C. Lindquist, and S.-H. Oh, “Periodic nanohole arrays with shape-enhanced plasmon resonance as real-time biosensors,” Appl. Phys. Lett.90(24), 243110 (2007).
[CrossRef]

Iu, H.

J. Li, H. Iu, J. T. K. Wan, and H. C. Ong, “The plasmonic properties of elliptical metallic hole arrays,” Appl. Phys. Lett.94(3), 033101 (2009).
[CrossRef]

Jefimovs, K.

T. Sannomiya, O. Scholder, K. Jefimovs, C. Hafner, and A. B. Dahlin, “Investigation of Plasmon Resonances in Metal Films with Nanohole Arrays for Biosensing Applications,” Small7(12), 1653–1663 (2011).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

Johansson, P.

Jones, D.

P. Lovera, D. Jones, and A. O’Riordan, “Elliptical nanohole array in thin gold film as micrometer sized optical filter set for fluorescent-labelled assays,” Journal of Physics: Conference Series307, 012006 (2011).
[CrossRef]

Käll, M.

Kaminska, B.

Kamohara, O.

A. A. Yanik, M. Huang, O. Kamohara, A. Artar, T. W. Geisbert, J. H. Connor, and H. Altug, “An optofluidic nanoplasmonic biosensor for direct detection of live viruses from biological media,” Nano Lett.10(12), 4962–4969 (2010).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

Kavanagh, K. L.

R. Gordon, D. Sinton, K. L. Kavanagh, and A. G. Brolo, “A new generation of sensors based on extraordinary optical transmission,” Acc. Chem. Res.41(8), 1049–1057 (2008).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

R. Gordon, M. Hughes, B. Leathem, K. L. Kavanagh, and A. G. Brolo, “Basis and lattice polarization mechanisms for light transmission through nanohole arrays in a metal film,” Nano Lett.5(7), 1243–1246 (2005).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

R. Gordon, A. G. Brolo, A. McKinnon, A. Rajora, B. Leathem, and K. L. Kavanagh, “Strong polarization in the optical transmission through elliptical nanohole arrays,” Phys. Rev. Lett.92(3), 037401 (2004).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

Khanikaev, A.

A. A. Yanik, A. E. Cetin, M. Huang, A. Artar, S. H. Mousavi, A. Khanikaev, J. H. Connor, G. Shvets, and H. Altug, “Seeing protein monolayers with naked eye through plasmonic Fano resonances,” Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.108(29), 11784–11789 (2011).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

Kim, S.-H.

Kivshar, Y. S.

A. E. Miroshnichenko, S. Flach, and Y. S. Kivshar, “Fano resonances in nanoscale structures,” Rev. Mod. Phys.82(3), 2257–2298 (2010).
[CrossRef]

Klein Koerkamp, K. J.

K. L. van der Molen, K. J. Klein Koerkamp, S. Enoch, F. B. Segerink, N. F. van Hulst, and L. Kuipers, “Role of shape and localized resonances in extraordinary transmission through periodic arrays of subwavelength holes: Experiment and theory,” Phys. Rev. B72(4), 045421 (2005).
[CrossRef]

Koerkamp, K. J. K.

K. J. K. Koerkamp, S. Enoch, F. B. Segerink, N. F. van Hulst, and L. Kuipers, “Strong influence of hole shape on extraordinary transmission through periodic arrays of subwavelength holes,” Phys. Rev. Lett.92(18), 183901 (2004).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

Kuipers, L.

K. L. van der Molen, K. J. Klein Koerkamp, S. Enoch, F. B. Segerink, N. F. van Hulst, and L. Kuipers, “Role of shape and localized resonances in extraordinary transmission through periodic arrays of subwavelength holes: Experiment and theory,” Phys. Rev. B72(4), 045421 (2005).
[CrossRef]

K. J. K. Koerkamp, S. Enoch, F. B. Segerink, N. F. van Hulst, and L. Kuipers, “Strong influence of hole shape on extraordinary transmission through periodic arrays of subwavelength holes,” Phys. Rev. Lett.92(18), 183901 (2004).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

Lalanne, P.

P. Lalanne, J. C. Rodier, and J. P. Hugonin, “Surface plasmons of metallic surfaces perforated by nanohole arrays,” J. Opt. A, Pure Appl. Opt.7(8), 422–426 (2005).
[CrossRef]

Leathem, B.

R. Gordon, M. Hughes, B. Leathem, K. L. Kavanagh, and A. G. Brolo, “Basis and lattice polarization mechanisms for light transmission through nanohole arrays in a metal film,” Nano Lett.5(7), 1243–1246 (2005).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

R. Gordon, A. G. Brolo, A. McKinnon, A. Rajora, B. Leathem, and K. L. Kavanagh, “Strong polarization in the optical transmission through elliptical nanohole arrays,” Phys. Rev. Lett.92(3), 037401 (2004).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

Lee, H.-S.

Lee, K.-D.

Lee, S. S.

Lesuffleur, A.

A. Lesuffleur, H. Im, N. C. Lindquist, and S.-H. Oh, “Periodic nanohole arrays with shape-enhanced plasmon resonance as real-time biosensors,” Appl. Phys. Lett.90(24), 243110 (2007).
[CrossRef]

Lezec, H. J.

A. Degiron, H. J. Lezec, N. Yamamoto, and T. W. Ebbesen, “Optical transmission properties of a single subwavelength aperture in a real metal,” Opt. Commun.239(1-3), 61–66 (2004).
[CrossRef]

H. F. Ghaemi, T. Thio, D. E. Grupp, T. W. Ebbesen, and H. J. Lezec, “Surface plasmons enhance optical transmission through subwavelength holes,” Phys. Rev. B58(11), 6779–6782 (1998).
[CrossRef]

T. W. Ebbesen, H. J. Lezec, H. F. Ghaemi, T. Thio, and P. A. Wolff, “Extraordinary optical transmission through sub-wavelength hole arrays,” Nature391(6668), 667–669 (1998).
[CrossRef]

Li, J.

J. Li, H. Iu, J. T. K. Wan, and H. C. Ong, “The plasmonic properties of elliptical metallic hole arrays,” Appl. Phys. Lett.94(3), 033101 (2009).
[CrossRef]

Li, J. Q.

S. Wu, Q. J. Wang, X. G. Yin, J. Q. Li, D. Zhu, S. Q. Liu, and Y. Y. Zhu, “Enhanced optical transmission: Role of the localized surface plasmon,” Appl. Phys. Lett.93(10), 101113 (2008).
[CrossRef]

Liew, Y. F.

Lindquist, N. C.

A. Lesuffleur, H. Im, N. C. Lindquist, and S.-H. Oh, “Periodic nanohole arrays with shape-enhanced plasmon resonance as real-time biosensors,” Appl. Phys. Lett.90(24), 243110 (2007).
[CrossRef]

Liu, S. Q.

S. Wu, Q. J. Wang, X. G. Yin, J. Q. Li, D. Zhu, S. Q. Liu, and Y. Y. Zhu, “Enhanced optical transmission: Role of the localized surface plasmon,” Appl. Phys. Lett.93(10), 101113 (2008).
[CrossRef]

Lovera, P.

P. Lovera, D. Jones, and A. O’Riordan, “Elliptical nanohole array in thin gold film as micrometer sized optical filter set for fluorescent-labelled assays,” Journal of Physics: Conference Series307, 012006 (2011).
[CrossRef]

Luk’yanchuk, B.

B. Luk’yanchuk, N. I. Zheludev, S. A. Maier, N. J. Halas, P. Nordlander, H. Giessen, and C. T. Chong, “The Fano resonance in plasmonic nanostructures and metamaterials,” Nat. Mater.9(9), 707–715 (2010).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

Lukiyanchuk, B.

Maier, S. A.

Y. Francescato, V. Giannini, and S. A. Maier, “Plasmonic Systems Unveiled by Fano Resonances,” ACS Nano6(2), 1830–1838 (2012).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

B. Luk’yanchuk, N. I. Zheludev, S. A. Maier, N. J. Halas, P. Nordlander, H. Giessen, and C. T. Chong, “The Fano resonance in plasmonic nanostructures and metamaterials,” Nat. Mater.9(9), 707–715 (2010).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

Y. Sonnefraud, N. Verellen, H. Sobhani, G. A. E. Vandenbosch, V. V. Moshchalkov, P. Van Dorpe, P. Nordlander, and S. A. Maier, “Experimental Realization of Subradiant, Superradiant, and Fano Resonances in Ring/Disk Plasmonic Nanocavities,” ACS Nano4(3), 1664–1670 (2010).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

Martín-Moreno, L.

S. G. Rodrigo, F. J. García-Vidal, and L. Martín-Moreno, “Influence of material properties on extraordinary optical transmission through hole arrays,” Phys. Rev. B77(7), 075401 (2008).
[CrossRef]

McKinnon, A.

R. Gordon, A. G. Brolo, A. McKinnon, A. Rajora, B. Leathem, and K. L. Kavanagh, “Strong polarization in the optical transmission through elliptical nanohole arrays,” Phys. Rev. Lett.92(3), 037401 (2004).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

Miroshnichenko, A. E.

A. E. Miroshnichenko, S. Flach, and Y. S. Kivshar, “Fano resonances in nanoscale structures,” Rev. Mod. Phys.82(3), 2257–2298 (2010).
[CrossRef]

Moshchalkov, V. V.

Y. Sonnefraud, N. Verellen, H. Sobhani, G. A. E. Vandenbosch, V. V. Moshchalkov, P. Van Dorpe, P. Nordlander, and S. A. Maier, “Experimental Realization of Subradiant, Superradiant, and Fano Resonances in Ring/Disk Plasmonic Nanocavities,” ACS Nano4(3), 1664–1670 (2010).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

Mousavi, S. H.

A. A. Yanik, A. E. Cetin, M. Huang, A. Artar, S. H. Mousavi, A. Khanikaev, J. H. Connor, G. Shvets, and H. Altug, “Seeing protein monolayers with naked eye through plasmonic Fano resonances,” Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.108(29), 11784–11789 (2011).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

Najiminaini, M.

Ng, B.

Nordlander, P.

Y. Sonnefraud, N. Verellen, H. Sobhani, G. A. E. Vandenbosch, V. V. Moshchalkov, P. Van Dorpe, P. Nordlander, and S. A. Maier, “Experimental Realization of Subradiant, Superradiant, and Fano Resonances in Ring/Disk Plasmonic Nanocavities,” ACS Nano4(3), 1664–1670 (2010).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

B. Luk’yanchuk, N. I. Zheludev, S. A. Maier, N. J. Halas, P. Nordlander, H. Giessen, and C. T. Chong, “The Fano resonance in plasmonic nanostructures and metamaterials,” Nat. Mater.9(9), 707–715 (2010).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

O’Riordan, A.

P. Lovera, D. Jones, and A. O’Riordan, “Elliptical nanohole array in thin gold film as micrometer sized optical filter set for fluorescent-labelled assays,” Journal of Physics: Conference Series307, 012006 (2011).
[CrossRef]

Odom, T. W.

H. Gao, J. Henzie, and T. W. Odom, “Direct Evidence for Surface Plasmon-Mediated Enhanced Light Transmission through Metallic Nanohole Arrays,” Nano Lett.6(9), 2104–2108 (2006).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

Oh, S.-H.

A. Lesuffleur, H. Im, N. C. Lindquist, and S.-H. Oh, “Periodic nanohole arrays with shape-enhanced plasmon resonance as real-time biosensors,” Appl. Phys. Lett.90(24), 243110 (2007).
[CrossRef]

Ong, H. C.

J. Li, H. Iu, J. T. K. Wan, and H. C. Ong, “The plasmonic properties of elliptical metallic hole arrays,” Appl. Phys. Lett.94(3), 033101 (2009).
[CrossRef]

Rahmani, M.

Rajora, A.

R. Gordon, A. G. Brolo, A. McKinnon, A. Rajora, B. Leathem, and K. L. Kavanagh, “Strong polarization in the optical transmission through elliptical nanohole arrays,” Phys. Rev. Lett.92(3), 037401 (2004).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

Ren, X. F.

X. F. Ren, P. Zhang, G. P. Guo, Y. F. Huang, Z. W. Wang, and G. C. Guo, “Polarization properties of subwavelength hole arrays consisting of rectangular holes,” Appl. Phys. B-Lasers Opt.91(3-4), 601–604 (2008).
[CrossRef]

Rodier, J. C.

P. Lalanne, J. C. Rodier, and J. P. Hugonin, “Surface plasmons of metallic surfaces perforated by nanohole arrays,” J. Opt. A, Pure Appl. Opt.7(8), 422–426 (2005).
[CrossRef]

Rodrigo, S. G.

S. G. Rodrigo, F. J. García-Vidal, and L. Martín-Moreno, “Influence of material properties on extraordinary optical transmission through hole arrays,” Phys. Rev. B77(7), 075401 (2008).
[CrossRef]

Sannomiya, T.

T. Sannomiya, O. Scholder, K. Jefimovs, C. Hafner, and A. B. Dahlin, “Investigation of Plasmon Resonances in Metal Films with Nanohole Arrays for Biosensing Applications,” Small7(12), 1653–1663 (2011).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

Schatz, G.

Scholder, O.

T. Sannomiya, O. Scholder, K. Jefimovs, C. Hafner, and A. B. Dahlin, “Investigation of Plasmon Resonances in Metal Films with Nanohole Arrays for Biosensing Applications,” Small7(12), 1653–1663 (2011).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

Segerink, F. B.

K. L. van der Molen, K. J. Klein Koerkamp, S. Enoch, F. B. Segerink, N. F. van Hulst, and L. Kuipers, “Role of shape and localized resonances in extraordinary transmission through periodic arrays of subwavelength holes: Experiment and theory,” Phys. Rev. B72(4), 045421 (2005).
[CrossRef]

K. J. K. Koerkamp, S. Enoch, F. B. Segerink, N. F. van Hulst, and L. Kuipers, “Strong influence of hole shape on extraordinary transmission through periodic arrays of subwavelength holes,” Phys. Rev. Lett.92(18), 183901 (2004).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

Seo, K.

T. Ellenbogen, K. Seo, and K. B. Crozier, “Chromatic Plasmonic Polarizers for Active Visible Color Filtering and Polarimetry,” Nano Lett.12(2), 1026–1031 (2012).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

Sepúlveda, B.

Shvets, G.

A. A. Yanik, A. E. Cetin, M. Huang, A. Artar, S. H. Mousavi, A. Khanikaev, J. H. Connor, G. Shvets, and H. Altug, “Seeing protein monolayers with naked eye through plasmonic Fano resonances,” Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.108(29), 11784–11789 (2011).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

Sinton, D.

R. Gordon, D. Sinton, K. L. Kavanagh, and A. G. Brolo, “A new generation of sensors based on extraordinary optical transmission,” Acc. Chem. Res.41(8), 1049–1057 (2008).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

Smolyaninov, I. I.

J. Elliott, I. I. Smolyaninov, N. I. Zheludev, and A. V. Zayats, “Polarization control of optical transmission of a periodic array of elliptical nanoholes in a metal film,” Opt. Lett.29(12), 1414–1416 (2004).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

J. Elliott, I. I. Smolyaninov, N. I. Zheludev, and A. V. Zayats, “Wavelength dependent birefringence of surface plasmon polaritonic crystals,” Phys. Rev. B70(23), 233403 (2004).
[CrossRef]

Sobhani, H.

Y. Sonnefraud, N. Verellen, H. Sobhani, G. A. E. Vandenbosch, V. V. Moshchalkov, P. Van Dorpe, P. Nordlander, and S. A. Maier, “Experimental Realization of Subradiant, Superradiant, and Fano Resonances in Ring/Disk Plasmonic Nanocavities,” ACS Nano4(3), 1664–1670 (2010).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

Sonnefraud, Y.

Y. Sonnefraud, N. Verellen, H. Sobhani, G. A. E. Vandenbosch, V. V. Moshchalkov, P. Van Dorpe, P. Nordlander, and S. A. Maier, “Experimental Realization of Subradiant, Superradiant, and Fano Resonances in Ring/Disk Plasmonic Nanocavities,” ACS Nano4(3), 1664–1670 (2010).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

Tavakkoli K. G, A.

Thio, T.

T. W. Ebbesen, H. J. Lezec, H. F. Ghaemi, T. Thio, and P. A. Wolff, “Extraordinary optical transmission through sub-wavelength hole arrays,” Nature391(6668), 667–669 (1998).
[CrossRef]

H. F. Ghaemi, T. Thio, D. E. Grupp, T. W. Ebbesen, and H. J. Lezec, “Surface plasmons enhance optical transmission through subwavelength holes,” Phys. Rev. B58(11), 6779–6782 (1998).
[CrossRef]

van der Molen, K. L.

K. L. van der Molen, K. J. Klein Koerkamp, S. Enoch, F. B. Segerink, N. F. van Hulst, and L. Kuipers, “Role of shape and localized resonances in extraordinary transmission through periodic arrays of subwavelength holes: Experiment and theory,” Phys. Rev. B72(4), 045421 (2005).
[CrossRef]

Van Dorpe, P.

Y. Sonnefraud, N. Verellen, H. Sobhani, G. A. E. Vandenbosch, V. V. Moshchalkov, P. Van Dorpe, P. Nordlander, and S. A. Maier, “Experimental Realization of Subradiant, Superradiant, and Fano Resonances in Ring/Disk Plasmonic Nanocavities,” ACS Nano4(3), 1664–1670 (2010).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

van Hulst, N. F.

K. L. van der Molen, K. J. Klein Koerkamp, S. Enoch, F. B. Segerink, N. F. van Hulst, and L. Kuipers, “Role of shape and localized resonances in extraordinary transmission through periodic arrays of subwavelength holes: Experiment and theory,” Phys. Rev. B72(4), 045421 (2005).
[CrossRef]

K. J. K. Koerkamp, S. Enoch, F. B. Segerink, N. F. van Hulst, and L. Kuipers, “Strong influence of hole shape on extraordinary transmission through periodic arrays of subwavelength holes,” Phys. Rev. Lett.92(18), 183901 (2004).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

Vandenbosch, G. A. E.

Y. Sonnefraud, N. Verellen, H. Sobhani, G. A. E. Vandenbosch, V. V. Moshchalkov, P. Van Dorpe, P. Nordlander, and S. A. Maier, “Experimental Realization of Subradiant, Superradiant, and Fano Resonances in Ring/Disk Plasmonic Nanocavities,” ACS Nano4(3), 1664–1670 (2010).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

Vasefi, F.

Verellen, N.

Y. Sonnefraud, N. Verellen, H. Sobhani, G. A. E. Vandenbosch, V. V. Moshchalkov, P. Van Dorpe, P. Nordlander, and S. A. Maier, “Experimental Realization of Subradiant, Superradiant, and Fano Resonances in Ring/Disk Plasmonic Nanocavities,” ACS Nano4(3), 1664–1670 (2010).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

Wan, J. T. K.

J. Li, H. Iu, J. T. K. Wan, and H. C. Ong, “The plasmonic properties of elliptical metallic hole arrays,” Appl. Phys. Lett.94(3), 033101 (2009).
[CrossRef]

Wang, Q. J.

S. Wu, Q. J. Wang, X. G. Yin, J. Q. Li, D. Zhu, S. Q. Liu, and Y. Y. Zhu, “Enhanced optical transmission: Role of the localized surface plasmon,” Appl. Phys. Lett.93(10), 101113 (2008).
[CrossRef]

Wang, Z. W.

X. F. Ren, P. Zhang, G. P. Guo, Y. F. Huang, Z. W. Wang, and G. C. Guo, “Polarization properties of subwavelength hole arrays consisting of rectangular holes,” Appl. Phys. B-Lasers Opt.91(3-4), 601–604 (2008).
[CrossRef]

Wolff, P. A.

T. W. Ebbesen, H. J. Lezec, H. F. Ghaemi, T. Thio, and P. A. Wolff, “Extraordinary optical transmission through sub-wavelength hole arrays,” Nature391(6668), 667–669 (1998).
[CrossRef]

Wu, S.

S. Wu, Q. J. Wang, X. G. Yin, J. Q. Li, D. Zhu, S. Q. Liu, and Y. Y. Zhu, “Enhanced optical transmission: Role of the localized surface plasmon,” Appl. Phys. Lett.93(10), 101113 (2008).
[CrossRef]

Yamamoto, N.

A. Degiron, H. J. Lezec, N. Yamamoto, and T. W. Ebbesen, “Optical transmission properties of a single subwavelength aperture in a real metal,” Opt. Commun.239(1-3), 61–66 (2004).
[CrossRef]

Yanik, A. A.

A. A. Yanik, A. E. Cetin, M. Huang, A. Artar, S. H. Mousavi, A. Khanikaev, J. H. Connor, G. Shvets, and H. Altug, “Seeing protein monolayers with naked eye through plasmonic Fano resonances,” Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.108(29), 11784–11789 (2011).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

A. A. Yanik, M. Huang, O. Kamohara, A. Artar, T. W. Geisbert, J. H. Connor, and H. Altug, “An optofluidic nanoplasmonic biosensor for direct detection of live viruses from biological media,” Nano Lett.10(12), 4962–4969 (2010).
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A. A. Yanik, R. Adato, S. Erramilli, and H. Altug, “Hybridized nanocavities as single-polarized plasmonic antennas,” Opt. Express17(23), 20900–20910 (2009).
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S. Wu, Q. J. Wang, X. G. Yin, J. Q. Li, D. Zhu, S. Q. Liu, and Y. Y. Zhu, “Enhanced optical transmission: Role of the localized surface plasmon,” Appl. Phys. Lett.93(10), 101113 (2008).
[CrossRef]

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S. Yokogawa, S. P. Burgos, and H. A. Atwater, “Plasmonic color filters for CMOS image sensor applications,” Nano Lett.12(8), 4349–4354 (2012).
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Yoon, Y.-T.

Zayats, A. V.

J. Elliott, I. I. Smolyaninov, N. I. Zheludev, and A. V. Zayats, “Wavelength dependent birefringence of surface plasmon polaritonic crystals,” Phys. Rev. B70(23), 233403 (2004).
[CrossRef]

J. Elliott, I. I. Smolyaninov, N. I. Zheludev, and A. V. Zayats, “Polarization control of optical transmission of a periodic array of elliptical nanoholes in a metal film,” Opt. Lett.29(12), 1414–1416 (2004).
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Zhang, P.

X. F. Ren, P. Zhang, G. P. Guo, Y. F. Huang, Z. W. Wang, and G. C. Guo, “Polarization properties of subwavelength hole arrays consisting of rectangular holes,” Appl. Phys. B-Lasers Opt.91(3-4), 601–604 (2008).
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Zheludev, N. I.

B. Luk’yanchuk, N. I. Zheludev, S. A. Maier, N. J. Halas, P. Nordlander, H. Giessen, and C. T. Chong, “The Fano resonance in plasmonic nanostructures and metamaterials,” Nat. Mater.9(9), 707–715 (2010).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

J. Elliott, I. I. Smolyaninov, N. I. Zheludev, and A. V. Zayats, “Wavelength dependent birefringence of surface plasmon polaritonic crystals,” Phys. Rev. B70(23), 233403 (2004).
[CrossRef]

J. Elliott, I. I. Smolyaninov, N. I. Zheludev, and A. V. Zayats, “Polarization control of optical transmission of a periodic array of elliptical nanoholes in a metal film,” Opt. Lett.29(12), 1414–1416 (2004).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

Zhu, D.

S. Wu, Q. J. Wang, X. G. Yin, J. Q. Li, D. Zhu, S. Q. Liu, and Y. Y. Zhu, “Enhanced optical transmission: Role of the localized surface plasmon,” Appl. Phys. Lett.93(10), 101113 (2008).
[CrossRef]

Zhu, Y. Y.

S. Wu, Q. J. Wang, X. G. Yin, J. Q. Li, D. Zhu, S. Q. Liu, and Y. Y. Zhu, “Enhanced optical transmission: Role of the localized surface plasmon,” Appl. Phys. Lett.93(10), 101113 (2008).
[CrossRef]

Acc. Chem. Res. (1)

R. Gordon, D. Sinton, K. L. Kavanagh, and A. G. Brolo, “A new generation of sensors based on extraordinary optical transmission,” Acc. Chem. Res.41(8), 1049–1057 (2008).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

ACS Nano (2)

Y. Francescato, V. Giannini, and S. A. Maier, “Plasmonic Systems Unveiled by Fano Resonances,” ACS Nano6(2), 1830–1838 (2012).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

Y. Sonnefraud, N. Verellen, H. Sobhani, G. A. E. Vandenbosch, V. V. Moshchalkov, P. Van Dorpe, P. Nordlander, and S. A. Maier, “Experimental Realization of Subradiant, Superradiant, and Fano Resonances in Ring/Disk Plasmonic Nanocavities,” ACS Nano4(3), 1664–1670 (2010).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

Appl. Phys. B-Lasers Opt. (1)

X. F. Ren, P. Zhang, G. P. Guo, Y. F. Huang, Z. W. Wang, and G. C. Guo, “Polarization properties of subwavelength hole arrays consisting of rectangular holes,” Appl. Phys. B-Lasers Opt.91(3-4), 601–604 (2008).
[CrossRef]

Appl. Phys. Lett. (3)

J. Li, H. Iu, J. T. K. Wan, and H. C. Ong, “The plasmonic properties of elliptical metallic hole arrays,” Appl. Phys. Lett.94(3), 033101 (2009).
[CrossRef]

A. Lesuffleur, H. Im, N. C. Lindquist, and S.-H. Oh, “Periodic nanohole arrays with shape-enhanced plasmon resonance as real-time biosensors,” Appl. Phys. Lett.90(24), 243110 (2007).
[CrossRef]

S. Wu, Q. J. Wang, X. G. Yin, J. Q. Li, D. Zhu, S. Q. Liu, and Y. Y. Zhu, “Enhanced optical transmission: Role of the localized surface plasmon,” Appl. Phys. Lett.93(10), 101113 (2008).
[CrossRef]

J. Opt. A, Pure Appl. Opt. (2)

A. Degiron and T. W. Ebbesen, “The role of localized surface plasmon modes in the enhanced transmission of periodic subwavelength apertures,” J. Opt. A, Pure Appl. Opt.7(2), S90–S96 (2005).
[CrossRef]

P. Lalanne, J. C. Rodier, and J. P. Hugonin, “Surface plasmons of metallic surfaces perforated by nanohole arrays,” J. Opt. A, Pure Appl. Opt.7(8), 422–426 (2005).
[CrossRef]

Journal of Physics: Conference Series (1)

P. Lovera, D. Jones, and A. O’Riordan, “Elliptical nanohole array in thin gold film as micrometer sized optical filter set for fluorescent-labelled assays,” Journal of Physics: Conference Series307, 012006 (2011).
[CrossRef]

Nano Lett. (5)

S. Yokogawa, S. P. Burgos, and H. A. Atwater, “Plasmonic color filters for CMOS image sensor applications,” Nano Lett.12(8), 4349–4354 (2012).
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A. A. Yanik, M. Huang, O. Kamohara, A. Artar, T. W. Geisbert, J. H. Connor, and H. Altug, “An optofluidic nanoplasmonic biosensor for direct detection of live viruses from biological media,” Nano Lett.10(12), 4962–4969 (2010).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

T. Ellenbogen, K. Seo, and K. B. Crozier, “Chromatic Plasmonic Polarizers for Active Visible Color Filtering and Polarimetry,” Nano Lett.12(2), 1026–1031 (2012).
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R. Gordon, M. Hughes, B. Leathem, K. L. Kavanagh, and A. G. Brolo, “Basis and lattice polarization mechanisms for light transmission through nanohole arrays in a metal film,” Nano Lett.5(7), 1243–1246 (2005).
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H. Gao, J. Henzie, and T. W. Odom, “Direct Evidence for Surface Plasmon-Mediated Enhanced Light Transmission through Metallic Nanohole Arrays,” Nano Lett.6(9), 2104–2108 (2006).
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Nat. Mater. (1)

B. Luk’yanchuk, N. I. Zheludev, S. A. Maier, N. J. Halas, P. Nordlander, H. Giessen, and C. T. Chong, “The Fano resonance in plasmonic nanostructures and metamaterials,” Nat. Mater.9(9), 707–715 (2010).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

Nature (2)

T. W. Ebbesen, H. J. Lezec, H. F. Ghaemi, T. Thio, and P. A. Wolff, “Extraordinary optical transmission through sub-wavelength hole arrays,” Nature391(6668), 667–669 (1998).
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W. L. Barnes, A. Dereux, and T. W. Ebbesen, “Surface plasmon subwavelength optics,” Nature424(6950), 824–830 (2003).
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Opt. Commun. (1)

A. Degiron, H. J. Lezec, N. Yamamoto, and T. W. Ebbesen, “Optical transmission properties of a single subwavelength aperture in a real metal,” Opt. Commun.239(1-3), 61–66 (2004).
[CrossRef]

Opt. Express (7)

S.-H. Chang, S. Gray, and G. Schatz, “Surface plasmon generation and light transmission by isolated nanoholes and arrays of nanoholes in thin metal films,” Opt. Express13(8), 3150–3165 (2005).
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H.-S. Lee, Y.-T. Yoon, S. S. Lee, S.-H. Kim, and K.-D. Lee, “Color filter based on a subwavelength patterned metal grating,” Opt. Express15(23), 15457–15463 (2007).
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B. Sepúlveda, Y. Alaverdyan, J. Alegret, M. Käll, and P. Johansson, “Shape effects in the localized surface plasmon resonance of single nanoholes in thin metal films,” Opt. Express16(8), 5609–5616 (2008).
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A. A. Yanik, R. Adato, S. Erramilli, and H. Altug, “Hybridized nanocavities as single-polarized plasmonic antennas,” Opt. Express17(23), 20900–20910 (2009).
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Q. Chen and D. R. S. Cumming, “High transmission and low color cross-talk plasmonic color filters using triangular-lattice hole arrays in aluminum films,” Opt. Express18(13), 14056–14062 (2010).
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M. Najiminaini, F. Vasefi, B. Kaminska, and J. J. L. Carson, “Experimental and numerical analysis on the optical resonance transmission properties of nano-hole arrays,” Opt. Express18(21), 22255–22270 (2010).
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M. Rahmani, B. Lukiyanchuk, B. Ng, A. Tavakkoli K. G, Y. F. Liew, and M. H. Hong, “Generation of pronounced Fano resonances and tuning of subwavelength spatial light distribution in plasmonic pentamers,” Opt. Express19(6), 4949–4956 (2011).
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Opt. Lett. (1)

Phys. Rev. B (4)

J. Elliott, I. I. Smolyaninov, N. I. Zheludev, and A. V. Zayats, “Wavelength dependent birefringence of surface plasmon polaritonic crystals,” Phys. Rev. B70(23), 233403 (2004).
[CrossRef]

K. L. van der Molen, K. J. Klein Koerkamp, S. Enoch, F. B. Segerink, N. F. van Hulst, and L. Kuipers, “Role of shape and localized resonances in extraordinary transmission through periodic arrays of subwavelength holes: Experiment and theory,” Phys. Rev. B72(4), 045421 (2005).
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H. F. Ghaemi, T. Thio, D. E. Grupp, T. W. Ebbesen, and H. J. Lezec, “Surface plasmons enhance optical transmission through subwavelength holes,” Phys. Rev. B58(11), 6779–6782 (1998).
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S. G. Rodrigo, F. J. García-Vidal, and L. Martín-Moreno, “Influence of material properties on extraordinary optical transmission through hole arrays,” Phys. Rev. B77(7), 075401 (2008).
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Phys. Rev. Lett. (2)

K. J. K. Koerkamp, S. Enoch, F. B. Segerink, N. F. van Hulst, and L. Kuipers, “Strong influence of hole shape on extraordinary transmission through periodic arrays of subwavelength holes,” Phys. Rev. Lett.92(18), 183901 (2004).
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R. Gordon, A. G. Brolo, A. McKinnon, A. Rajora, B. Leathem, and K. L. Kavanagh, “Strong polarization in the optical transmission through elliptical nanohole arrays,” Phys. Rev. Lett.92(3), 037401 (2004).
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Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. (1)

A. A. Yanik, A. E. Cetin, M. Huang, A. Artar, S. H. Mousavi, A. Khanikaev, J. H. Connor, G. Shvets, and H. Altug, “Seeing protein monolayers with naked eye through plasmonic Fano resonances,” Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.108(29), 11784–11789 (2011).
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Rev. Mod. Phys. (1)

A. E. Miroshnichenko, S. Flach, and Y. S. Kivshar, “Fano resonances in nanoscale structures,” Rev. Mod. Phys.82(3), 2257–2298 (2010).
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Small (1)

T. Sannomiya, O. Scholder, K. Jefimovs, C. Hafner, and A. B. Dahlin, “Investigation of Plasmon Resonances in Metal Films with Nanohole Arrays for Biosensing Applications,” Small7(12), 1653–1663 (2011).
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Other (2)

JDFTD3D, www.thecomputationalphysicist.com .

S. A. Maier, Plasmonics: Fundamentals and Applications, Springer (New York, 2007).

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Figures (4)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

SEM (a) and AFM (b) micrographs of the array of elliptical nanopores in a thin gold film. Insets: higher resolution image of four nanopores Lattice period is 450nm, nanopore dimensions are 350x150nm with orientation angle of 45° with respect to the array edge. Measured (black curve) and FDTD simulated (red curve) far-field transmission spectrum with light polarized across (c) the short and (d) the long axis of the ellipses. Blue curves show the transmission spectrum through an un-patterned gold film

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

FDTD calculated frequency-resolved |Ez|2 profiles at (a) λ = 960nm, (b) λ = 690nm (c) λ = 735 nm and (d) λ = 595 nm with incident light polarized along the short axis of the ellipses. Top panels show near field profiles 10 nm below the Au film and bottom shows cross section across the middle of the ellipses. The hole is centered at the origin, and the film boundaries are outlined in white.

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

FDTD calculated frequency-resolved |Ez|2 profiles at (a) λ = 735nm, (b) λ = 715nm with incident light polarized along the long axis of the ellipses. Top panels show near field profiles 10 nm below the Au film and bottom shows cross section across the middle of the ellipses. The hole is centered at the origin, and the film boundaries are outlined in white.

Fig. 4
Fig. 4

(a) illustration of the polarization-dependant color transmission with mapping of spectra to points on the CIE 1931 coordinates showing blue to white light tuning (b) Real color transmission images showing dual visible-invisible tagging. Top: no filter and light polarized along (white) and across (blue) the long axis of the ellipse. Bottom: same images through 700nm long path filters (c) Polarized transmission spectra acquired every 30°. (d) Transmission intensity vs. polarization angle for wavelength of 570, 690 and 750nm. Solid lines are cos2 θ fit.

Tables (1)

Tables Icon

Table 1 Solutions of Eqs. (1) and (2) predicting the spectral positions of Surface Plasmon Polariton and Rayleigh Anomaly on the glass/metal and metal/ air interfaces.

Equations (2)

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λ SPP = P ( n x 2 + n y 2 ) 1/2 ( ε Au ε ε Au + ε ) 1/2
λ RA = P ( n x 2 + n y 2 ) 1/2 ε

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