Abstract

We report on an all-fiber femtosecond Ytterbium laser without dispersion compensation operating in the similariton pulse regime. The oscillator was mode-locked with a saturable Bragg reflector along with nonlinear polarization evolution. A pulse energy of 0.8 nJ was achieved with a pulse duration of 10 ps. The pulses could be externally dechirped to 627fs which was within 8.7% of the Fourier transform limited pulse duration. The realized oscillator combines compact size, high stability and alignment-free operation.

©2007 Optical Society of America

1. Introduction

In the last years passively mode-locked Ytterbium fiber lasers have been intensively investigated owing to their potential in realizing reliable and cost-effective ultrafast light sources around 1 μm, which are highly requested for many applications like frequency metrology or biophotonics. One main goal of the present research is the maximization of the output energy of those laser systems. This effort resulted in the realization of self-similar operation which has commonly been recognized as a promising route to high energy pulses [1, 2]. A second but not less important topic is the realization of compact, high stability and alignment-free complete fiber-based set-ups, similar to current ultrafast Erbium fiber lasers at 1.5 μm [3]. In this wavelength range, gain fibers have a normal group velocity dispersion (GVD) and passive fibers with anomalous GVD above 1.3 μm (zero dispersion point of fused silica) can be used for an efficient dispersion management. This simple implementation is not possible at 1 μm, thus either bulk intracavity grating pairs [1], photonic crystal fibers [4, 5, 6, 7], higher-order mode fibers [8] or chirped fiber Bragg gratings [9] have been used to provide anomalous GVD. Furthermore, instead of dispersion control spectral filtering with an interference filter has successfully been applied [10]. In another approach Adel et al. reported on a mode-locked Ytterbium fiber laser system operating without any anomalous dispersion control [11]. This idea has been continued by Herda and Okhotnikow, who recently published their results on a dispersion compensation-free ultrafast Ytterbium fiber laser, which has been mode-locked by a saturable absorber mirror generating low energy pulses [12]. In this study pulse durations were in excess of several picoseconds due to the highly uncompensated chirp. For these lasers without dispersion compensation a stable mode-locking is possible due to filtering effects by the gain bandwidth and in [12] by the saturable absorber respectively acting as a effective dispersion compensation. In the similariton pulse regime such filtering effects are more stringent because of the high chirp of the pulses [13]. Therefore it is possible to generate stable pulses trains with a highly linear chirp characteristic for similaritons.

Here, we report to the best of our knowledge for the first time on a mode-locked all-fiber laser at 1 μm without internal dispersion compensation operating in the similariton pulse regime. We have successfully integrated discrete parts by fiber integrated components, spliced to an all-fiber ring cavity providing an alignment free and stable single pulse operation.

2. Experimental setup

The experimental setup of the all-fiber laser is shown in Fig. 1. A 16 cm long highly doped Ytterbium gain fiber (1200 dBm-1 absorption at 976 nm) was core pumped by a single mode laser diode with an output power of 400 mW via a 976 nm / 1026 nm wavelength division multiplexer. For unidirectional operation a fiber coupled polarization dependent isolator was placed 0.46 cm behind the gain fiber, whose rejection port was used as the output port. This isolator was optimized for a wavelength of 1064 nm and therefore caused increased losses at 1028 nm but did not introduce any significant spectral changes in the transmitted or reflected power spectrum, which was ensured with a broadband spectrum before integrating in the laser. A fiber coupled polarization beam splitter (PBS) followed 102 cm of standard fiber behind the isolator. Both the fiber coupled isolator and the fiber coupled PBS were alignment-free micro-optical parts. In combination with a polarization controller (PC), a sigma branch with 94cm standard fiber and a fiber coupled saturable Bragg-reflector (SBR) was realized followed by 2.6 m of standard fiber including a 2 % linear output coupler acting as a monitor port. The commercially available fiber coupled SBR had a low-intensity absorption of 40 %, a modulation depth of 24 %, a relaxation time constant < 500 fs and a saturation fluence of 130μJ cm-2 [14]. It was shown by Herda et. al. that a high value of nonlinear reflectivity of the SBR allows reliable self starting continuous wave mode locking with picosecond pulses for large values of normal net dispersion [12]. For our setup, we calculated a net dispersion of 0.147 ps2. In order to manipulate the polarization state for the nonlinear polarization evolution (NPE) in the fiber section [15] we used mechanical polarization controller. Although the SBR dominated self-starting operation, the output characteristics were still sensitive to the settings of the polarization controllers. This indicates that the SBR enabled the start-up characteristics of the mode-locking process whereas the pulse shaping in the steady state was caused by NPE [16]. Due to the highly chirped nature of the pulses strong influences of temporal or spectral filtering effects are present. By adjusting the polarization controller we manipulate the state of polarization for the NPE leading to slightly changed transmission characteristics and filtering effects respectively. As a result changes in the spectral width up to 1 nm could be observed. However, it is to mention that the laser always operates in the self similar regime.

 

Fig. 1. Schematic of the fiber ring cavity. PC: polarization controller, SBR: fiber coupled saturable Bragg-reflector, WDM: wavelength division multiplexer; ISO: fiber coupled isolator, PBS: fiber coupled polarization beam splitter.

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3. Experimental results

In Fig. 2(a) the output power in respect to pump power is shown. Quasi-continuous-wave operation started at pump powers of 48 mW and self starting mode-locking operation was achieved for pump powers above 148 mW. For pump power above 260mW multiple pulse operation could be observed due to overdriving of the virtual saturable absorber (NPE). By measuring the power at the 2 % linear coupler we estimated the fluence on the SBR. We operated the SBR a factor of six over the saturation fluence which is a typical value for stable single pulse mode-locking [17]. Therefore we conclude that overdriving of the SBR was not the reason for the multiple pulse operation.

The slope efficiency was 9 % and a maximum output of 28 mW could be achieved for stable single pulse operation, which was verified by using a combination of a long range second harmonic autocorrelator (150 ps scanning range) and a fast InGaAs-photodetector (rise-time <70 ps) with a 1 GHz oscilloscope. A typical power spectrum of the generated similaritons with its characteristic steep edges is shown on a logarithmic and a linear scale in Fig. 2(b). It should be noted that for increasing pump power above the mode-locking threshold a slight increase of the spectral bandwidth could be observed. More important, no significant changes in the spectral shape could be observed, which is an indication for self-similar operation. The measured spectral width was 4.2 nm (FWHM) centered at a wavelength of 1028 nm.

 

Fig. 2. (a) Measured output power in respect to pump power with a mode-locking threshold of 145 mW (left) and (b) measured output spectrum of a similariton on a logarithmic scale and a linear scale (inset) centered at 1028 nm with a FWHM of 4.2 nm.

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Fig. 3. (a) Measured photodetector signal and (b) RF-spectrum from 0 MHz to 1 GHz.

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In Fig. 3(a) the measured time signal of the photodiode and the corresponding RF-spectrum (Fig. 3(b)) are shown. As can be seen, the fundamental repetition rate was 34.8MHz corresponding to a maximum pulse energy of 0.8 nJ at maximum average output power. Since the laser operated at a large normal net dispersion without any dispersion compensation, strongly chirped output pulses were expected at the rejection port. In Fig. 4(a), the measured second order autocorrelation trace at the rejection port is shown. The autocorrelation width of 14 ps corresponds to a pulse duration of 10 ps assuming a Gaussian shape for similariton pulses [13]. From the measured power spectrum we calculated the bandwidth limited pulse duration to 548 fs by a fast Fourier transformation assuming a zero phase (Fig.4(b)). This chirp factor of 13 points out that the output pulses were highly chirped.

The output pulses were externally dechirped with a grating compressor with an anomalous dispersion of -0.95 ps2. The dechirped pulses had an autocorrelation width of 873 fs corresponding to a pulse width of 629 fs assuming a Gaussian profile (Fig. 4(b)). Therefore the measured pulse duration was within 8.7 % of the Fourier transform limit pointing out the highly linear chirp of the pulses. The small wings in the autocorrelation traces indicate uncompensated higher order dispersion, which resulted mainly from the positive third order dispersion (TOD) in the cavity (1.4∙105 fs3) and the positive TOD generated by the used external grating compressor (2.2∙106 fs3).

The large positive chirp of the pulses at the output port can not be removed during the round trip as the pulse compression is only caused by filters. It is obvious that neither spectral (gain bandwidth) nor temporal (saturable absorbers) filters can flip the chirp from positive to negative. Therefore we conclude, that the pulses were positively chirped at every position in the cavity being also an evidence for self-similar operation in a laser.

 

Fig. 4. (a) Measured second order autocorrelation of the output pulses with an autocorrelation width of 14 ps, of the dechirped output pulses with an autocorrelation width of 873 fs ((b), solid curve) and the calculated autocorrelation function of the transform limited pulse ((b), dashed curve).

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4. Conclusion

In conclusion we presented to the best of our knowledge the first all-fiber ring cavity operating in the similariton pulse regime without any dispersion compensation. The spectra were centered around 1028 nm with a half width of 4.2 nm. The output pulses had a pulse duration of 10 ps assuming a Gaussian pulse shape and a pulse energy of 0.8 nJ, although the fiber coupled isolator was not optimized for laser operation at 1028 nm. The pulses could be dechirped to 629 fs, which was only a deviation of 8.7 % of the Fourier transform limit. With this all-fiber setup an alignment-free, highly compact and stable femtosecond laser source at 1 μm was realized. Further system integration should be possible by using a fiber pulse compressor based on a hollow core photonic bandgap fiber [18].

Acknowledgments

This research was supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft in the frame of SFB 407.

References and links

1. F.Ö. Ilday, J.R. Buckley, W.G. Clark, and F.W. Wise, “Self-Similar Evolution of Parabolic Pulses in a Laser,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 213902 (2004). [CrossRef]   [PubMed]  

2. J.R. Buckley, F.W. Wise, F.O. Ilday, and T. Sosnowski, “Femtosecond fiber laser with energies above 10 nJ,” Opt. Lett. 30, 1888–1890 (2005). [CrossRef]   [PubMed]  

3. H.A. Haus, K. Tamura, L.E. Nelson, and E.P. Ippen, “Stretched-Pulse Additive Pulse Mode-Locking in Fiber Ring Lasers: Theory and Experiment,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 11, 591–598 (1995). [CrossRef]  

4. H. Lim, F.O. Ilday, and F. Wise, “Femtosecond ytterbium fiber laser with photonic crystal fiber for dispersion control,” Opt. Express 10, 1497–1502 (2002), http://www.opticsinfobase.org/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-10-25-1497. [PubMed]  

5. A. Ruehl, O. Prochnow, M. Engelbrecht, D. Wandt, and D. Kracht, “Similariton fiber laser with photonic bandgap fiber for dispersion control,” Opt. Lett. 32, 1084–1086 (2007). [CrossRef]   [PubMed]  

6. A. Isomäki and O.G. Okhotnikov, “Femtosecond soliton mode-locked laser based on ytterbium-doped photonic bandgap fiber,” Opt. Express 14, 9238–9243 (2006), http://www.opticsinfobase.org/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-14-20-9238. [CrossRef]   [PubMed]  

7. A. Isomäki and O.G. Okhotnikov, “All-fiber ytterbium soliton mode-locked laser with dispersion control by solid-core photonic bandgap fiber,” Opt. Express 14, 4368–4373 (2006), http://www.opticsinfobase.org/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-14-10-4368. [CrossRef]   [PubMed]  

8. S. Ramachandran, S. Ghalmi, J.W. Nicholson, M.F. Yan, P. Wisk, E. Monberg, and F. V. Dimarcello, “Anomalous dispersion in a solid, silica-based fiber,” Opt. Lett. 31, 2532–2534 (2006). [CrossRef]   [PubMed]  

9. I. Hartl, G. Imeshev, G.C. Cho, and M.E. Fermann, “Ultra-compact dispersion compensated femtosecond fiber oscillators and amplifiers,” in Conference on Laser and Electro-Optics, Cleo 2005 (Optical Society of America, 2005), paper CThG1.

10. A. Chong, J. Buckley, W. Renninger, and F. Wise, “All-normal dispersion femtosecond fiber laser,” Opt. Express 14, 10095–10100 (2006), http://www.opticsinfobase.org/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-14-21-10095. [CrossRef]   [PubMed]  

11. P. Adel, M. Auerbach, C. Fallnich, and H. Welling, “Super-stretched, mode-locked Yb3+-fiber laser with 33 nm bandwidth and 56 nJ pulse energy,” in Advanced Solid-State Lasers, OSA Technical Digest (Optical Society of America, Washington DC, 2001), pp. 221–223.

12. R. Herda and O.G. Okhotnikov, “Dispersion Compensation-Free Fiber Laser Mode-Locked and Stabilized by High-Contrast Saturable Absorber Mirror,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 40, 893–899 (2004). [CrossRef]  

13. A. Ruehl, O. Prochnow, D. Wandt, D. Kracht, B. Burgoyne, N. Godbout, and S. Lacroix, “Dynamics of parabolic pulses in an ultrafast fiber laser,” Opt. Lett. 18, 2734–2736 (2006). [CrossRef]  

14. Datasheet of SAM-1040-40-x, Batop GmbH, http://www.batop.de.

15. H.A. Haus, E.P. Ippen, and K. Tamura, “Additive pulse mode locking in fiber lasers,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 30, 200–208 (1994). [CrossRef]  

16. M.E. Fermann, D. Harter, J.D. Minelly, and G.G. Vienne, “Cladding-pumped passively mode-locked fiber laser generating femtosecond and picosecond pulses,” Opt. Lett. 21, 967–979 (1996). [CrossRef]   [PubMed]  

17. S. Spaelter, M. Boehm, M. Burk, B. Mikulla, R. Fluck, I.D. Jung, G. Zhang, U. Keller, A. Sizmann, and G. Leuchs, “Self-starting soliton-modelocked femtosecond Cr(4+):YAG laser using an antiresonant Fabry-Perot saturable absorber,” Appl. Phys. B 65, 335–338 (1997). [CrossRef]  

18. A. Ruehl, O. Prochnow, D. Wandt, and D. Kracht, “Photonic bandgap fiber for dispersion management of simi-laritons around 1μm,” in Conference on Laser and Electro-Optics, Cleo 2006 (Optical Society of America, 2006), paper JWB68.

References

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  1. F.Ö. Ilday, J.R. Buckley, W.G. Clark, and F.W. Wise, “Self-Similar Evolution of Parabolic Pulses in a Laser,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 213902 (2004).
    [Crossref] [PubMed]
  2. J.R. Buckley, F.W. Wise, F.O. Ilday, and T. Sosnowski, “Femtosecond fiber laser with energies above 10 nJ,” Opt. Lett. 30, 1888–1890 (2005).
    [Crossref] [PubMed]
  3. H.A. Haus, K. Tamura, L.E. Nelson, and E.P. Ippen, “Stretched-Pulse Additive Pulse Mode-Locking in Fiber Ring Lasers: Theory and Experiment,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 11, 591–598 (1995).
    [Crossref]
  4. H. Lim, F.O. Ilday, and F. Wise, “Femtosecond ytterbium fiber laser with photonic crystal fiber for dispersion control,” Opt. Express 10, 1497–1502 (2002), http://www.opticsinfobase.org/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-10-25-1497.
    [PubMed]
  5. A. Ruehl, O. Prochnow, M. Engelbrecht, D. Wandt, and D. Kracht, “Similariton fiber laser with photonic bandgap fiber for dispersion control,” Opt. Lett. 32, 1084–1086 (2007).
    [Crossref] [PubMed]
  6. A. Isomäki and O.G. Okhotnikov, “Femtosecond soliton mode-locked laser based on ytterbium-doped photonic bandgap fiber,” Opt. Express 14, 9238–9243 (2006), http://www.opticsinfobase.org/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-14-20-9238.
    [Crossref] [PubMed]
  7. A. Isomäki and O.G. Okhotnikov, “All-fiber ytterbium soliton mode-locked laser with dispersion control by solid-core photonic bandgap fiber,” Opt. Express 14, 4368–4373 (2006), http://www.opticsinfobase.org/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-14-10-4368.
    [Crossref] [PubMed]
  8. S. Ramachandran, S. Ghalmi, J.W. Nicholson, M.F. Yan, P. Wisk, E. Monberg, and F. V. Dimarcello, “Anomalous dispersion in a solid, silica-based fiber,” Opt. Lett. 31, 2532–2534 (2006).
    [Crossref] [PubMed]
  9. I. Hartl, G. Imeshev, G.C. Cho, and M.E. Fermann, “Ultra-compact dispersion compensated femtosecond fiber oscillators and amplifiers,” in Conference on Laser and Electro-Optics, Cleo 2005 (Optical Society of America, 2005), paper CThG1.
  10. A. Chong, J. Buckley, W. Renninger, and F. Wise, “All-normal dispersion femtosecond fiber laser,” Opt. Express 14, 10095–10100 (2006), http://www.opticsinfobase.org/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-14-21-10095.
    [Crossref] [PubMed]
  11. P. Adel, M. Auerbach, C. Fallnich, and H. Welling, “Super-stretched, mode-locked Yb3+-fiber laser with 33 nm bandwidth and 56 nJ pulse energy,” in Advanced Solid-State Lasers, OSA Technical Digest (Optical Society of America, Washington DC, 2001), pp. 221–223.
  12. R. Herda and O.G. Okhotnikov, “Dispersion Compensation-Free Fiber Laser Mode-Locked and Stabilized by High-Contrast Saturable Absorber Mirror,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 40, 893–899 (2004).
    [Crossref]
  13. A. Ruehl, O. Prochnow, D. Wandt, D. Kracht, B. Burgoyne, N. Godbout, and S. Lacroix, “Dynamics of parabolic pulses in an ultrafast fiber laser,” Opt. Lett. 18, 2734–2736 (2006).
    [Crossref]
  14. Datasheet of SAM-1040-40-x, Batop GmbH, http://www.batop.de.
  15. H.A. Haus, E.P. Ippen, and K. Tamura, “Additive pulse mode locking in fiber lasers,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 30, 200–208 (1994).
    [Crossref]
  16. M.E. Fermann, D. Harter, J.D. Minelly, and G.G. Vienne, “Cladding-pumped passively mode-locked fiber laser generating femtosecond and picosecond pulses,” Opt. Lett. 21, 967–979 (1996).
    [Crossref] [PubMed]
  17. S. Spaelter, M. Boehm, M. Burk, B. Mikulla, R. Fluck, I.D. Jung, G. Zhang, U. Keller, A. Sizmann, and G. Leuchs, “Self-starting soliton-modelocked femtosecond Cr(4+):YAG laser using an antiresonant Fabry-Perot saturable absorber,” Appl. Phys. B 65, 335–338 (1997).
    [Crossref]
  18. A. Ruehl, O. Prochnow, D. Wandt, and D. Kracht, “Photonic bandgap fiber for dispersion management of simi-laritons around 1μm,” in Conference on Laser and Electro-Optics, Cleo 2006 (Optical Society of America, 2006), paper JWB68.

2007 (1)

2006 (5)

2005 (1)

2004 (2)

F.Ö. Ilday, J.R. Buckley, W.G. Clark, and F.W. Wise, “Self-Similar Evolution of Parabolic Pulses in a Laser,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 213902 (2004).
[Crossref] [PubMed]

R. Herda and O.G. Okhotnikov, “Dispersion Compensation-Free Fiber Laser Mode-Locked and Stabilized by High-Contrast Saturable Absorber Mirror,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 40, 893–899 (2004).
[Crossref]

2002 (1)

1997 (1)

S. Spaelter, M. Boehm, M. Burk, B. Mikulla, R. Fluck, I.D. Jung, G. Zhang, U. Keller, A. Sizmann, and G. Leuchs, “Self-starting soliton-modelocked femtosecond Cr(4+):YAG laser using an antiresonant Fabry-Perot saturable absorber,” Appl. Phys. B 65, 335–338 (1997).
[Crossref]

1996 (1)

1995 (1)

H.A. Haus, K. Tamura, L.E. Nelson, and E.P. Ippen, “Stretched-Pulse Additive Pulse Mode-Locking in Fiber Ring Lasers: Theory and Experiment,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 11, 591–598 (1995).
[Crossref]

1994 (1)

H.A. Haus, E.P. Ippen, and K. Tamura, “Additive pulse mode locking in fiber lasers,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 30, 200–208 (1994).
[Crossref]

Adel, P.

P. Adel, M. Auerbach, C. Fallnich, and H. Welling, “Super-stretched, mode-locked Yb3+-fiber laser with 33 nm bandwidth and 56 nJ pulse energy,” in Advanced Solid-State Lasers, OSA Technical Digest (Optical Society of America, Washington DC, 2001), pp. 221–223.

Auerbach, M.

P. Adel, M. Auerbach, C. Fallnich, and H. Welling, “Super-stretched, mode-locked Yb3+-fiber laser with 33 nm bandwidth and 56 nJ pulse energy,” in Advanced Solid-State Lasers, OSA Technical Digest (Optical Society of America, Washington DC, 2001), pp. 221–223.

Boehm, M.

S. Spaelter, M. Boehm, M. Burk, B. Mikulla, R. Fluck, I.D. Jung, G. Zhang, U. Keller, A. Sizmann, and G. Leuchs, “Self-starting soliton-modelocked femtosecond Cr(4+):YAG laser using an antiresonant Fabry-Perot saturable absorber,” Appl. Phys. B 65, 335–338 (1997).
[Crossref]

Buckley, J.

Buckley, J.R.

J.R. Buckley, F.W. Wise, F.O. Ilday, and T. Sosnowski, “Femtosecond fiber laser with energies above 10 nJ,” Opt. Lett. 30, 1888–1890 (2005).
[Crossref] [PubMed]

F.Ö. Ilday, J.R. Buckley, W.G. Clark, and F.W. Wise, “Self-Similar Evolution of Parabolic Pulses in a Laser,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 213902 (2004).
[Crossref] [PubMed]

Burgoyne, B.

A. Ruehl, O. Prochnow, D. Wandt, D. Kracht, B. Burgoyne, N. Godbout, and S. Lacroix, “Dynamics of parabolic pulses in an ultrafast fiber laser,” Opt. Lett. 18, 2734–2736 (2006).
[Crossref]

Burk, M.

S. Spaelter, M. Boehm, M. Burk, B. Mikulla, R. Fluck, I.D. Jung, G. Zhang, U. Keller, A. Sizmann, and G. Leuchs, “Self-starting soliton-modelocked femtosecond Cr(4+):YAG laser using an antiresonant Fabry-Perot saturable absorber,” Appl. Phys. B 65, 335–338 (1997).
[Crossref]

Cho, G.C.

I. Hartl, G. Imeshev, G.C. Cho, and M.E. Fermann, “Ultra-compact dispersion compensated femtosecond fiber oscillators and amplifiers,” in Conference on Laser and Electro-Optics, Cleo 2005 (Optical Society of America, 2005), paper CThG1.

Chong, A.

Clark, W.G.

F.Ö. Ilday, J.R. Buckley, W.G. Clark, and F.W. Wise, “Self-Similar Evolution of Parabolic Pulses in a Laser,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 213902 (2004).
[Crossref] [PubMed]

Dimarcello, F. V.

Engelbrecht, M.

Fallnich, C.

P. Adel, M. Auerbach, C. Fallnich, and H. Welling, “Super-stretched, mode-locked Yb3+-fiber laser with 33 nm bandwidth and 56 nJ pulse energy,” in Advanced Solid-State Lasers, OSA Technical Digest (Optical Society of America, Washington DC, 2001), pp. 221–223.

Fermann, M.E.

M.E. Fermann, D. Harter, J.D. Minelly, and G.G. Vienne, “Cladding-pumped passively mode-locked fiber laser generating femtosecond and picosecond pulses,” Opt. Lett. 21, 967–979 (1996).
[Crossref] [PubMed]

I. Hartl, G. Imeshev, G.C. Cho, and M.E. Fermann, “Ultra-compact dispersion compensated femtosecond fiber oscillators and amplifiers,” in Conference on Laser and Electro-Optics, Cleo 2005 (Optical Society of America, 2005), paper CThG1.

Fluck, R.

S. Spaelter, M. Boehm, M. Burk, B. Mikulla, R. Fluck, I.D. Jung, G. Zhang, U. Keller, A. Sizmann, and G. Leuchs, “Self-starting soliton-modelocked femtosecond Cr(4+):YAG laser using an antiresonant Fabry-Perot saturable absorber,” Appl. Phys. B 65, 335–338 (1997).
[Crossref]

Ghalmi, S.

Godbout, N.

A. Ruehl, O. Prochnow, D. Wandt, D. Kracht, B. Burgoyne, N. Godbout, and S. Lacroix, “Dynamics of parabolic pulses in an ultrafast fiber laser,” Opt. Lett. 18, 2734–2736 (2006).
[Crossref]

Harter, D.

Hartl, I.

I. Hartl, G. Imeshev, G.C. Cho, and M.E. Fermann, “Ultra-compact dispersion compensated femtosecond fiber oscillators and amplifiers,” in Conference on Laser and Electro-Optics, Cleo 2005 (Optical Society of America, 2005), paper CThG1.

Haus, H.A.

H.A. Haus, K. Tamura, L.E. Nelson, and E.P. Ippen, “Stretched-Pulse Additive Pulse Mode-Locking in Fiber Ring Lasers: Theory and Experiment,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 11, 591–598 (1995).
[Crossref]

H.A. Haus, E.P. Ippen, and K. Tamura, “Additive pulse mode locking in fiber lasers,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 30, 200–208 (1994).
[Crossref]

Herda, R.

R. Herda and O.G. Okhotnikov, “Dispersion Compensation-Free Fiber Laser Mode-Locked and Stabilized by High-Contrast Saturable Absorber Mirror,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 40, 893–899 (2004).
[Crossref]

Ilday, F.O.

Ilday, F.Ö.

F.Ö. Ilday, J.R. Buckley, W.G. Clark, and F.W. Wise, “Self-Similar Evolution of Parabolic Pulses in a Laser,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 213902 (2004).
[Crossref] [PubMed]

Imeshev, G.

I. Hartl, G. Imeshev, G.C. Cho, and M.E. Fermann, “Ultra-compact dispersion compensated femtosecond fiber oscillators and amplifiers,” in Conference on Laser and Electro-Optics, Cleo 2005 (Optical Society of America, 2005), paper CThG1.

Ippen, E.P.

H.A. Haus, K. Tamura, L.E. Nelson, and E.P. Ippen, “Stretched-Pulse Additive Pulse Mode-Locking in Fiber Ring Lasers: Theory and Experiment,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 11, 591–598 (1995).
[Crossref]

H.A. Haus, E.P. Ippen, and K. Tamura, “Additive pulse mode locking in fiber lasers,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 30, 200–208 (1994).
[Crossref]

Isomäki, A.

Jung, I.D.

S. Spaelter, M. Boehm, M. Burk, B. Mikulla, R. Fluck, I.D. Jung, G. Zhang, U. Keller, A. Sizmann, and G. Leuchs, “Self-starting soliton-modelocked femtosecond Cr(4+):YAG laser using an antiresonant Fabry-Perot saturable absorber,” Appl. Phys. B 65, 335–338 (1997).
[Crossref]

Keller, U.

S. Spaelter, M. Boehm, M. Burk, B. Mikulla, R. Fluck, I.D. Jung, G. Zhang, U. Keller, A. Sizmann, and G. Leuchs, “Self-starting soliton-modelocked femtosecond Cr(4+):YAG laser using an antiresonant Fabry-Perot saturable absorber,” Appl. Phys. B 65, 335–338 (1997).
[Crossref]

Kracht, D.

A. Ruehl, O. Prochnow, M. Engelbrecht, D. Wandt, and D. Kracht, “Similariton fiber laser with photonic bandgap fiber for dispersion control,” Opt. Lett. 32, 1084–1086 (2007).
[Crossref] [PubMed]

A. Ruehl, O. Prochnow, D. Wandt, D. Kracht, B. Burgoyne, N. Godbout, and S. Lacroix, “Dynamics of parabolic pulses in an ultrafast fiber laser,” Opt. Lett. 18, 2734–2736 (2006).
[Crossref]

A. Ruehl, O. Prochnow, D. Wandt, and D. Kracht, “Photonic bandgap fiber for dispersion management of simi-laritons around 1μm,” in Conference on Laser and Electro-Optics, Cleo 2006 (Optical Society of America, 2006), paper JWB68.

Lacroix, S.

A. Ruehl, O. Prochnow, D. Wandt, D. Kracht, B. Burgoyne, N. Godbout, and S. Lacroix, “Dynamics of parabolic pulses in an ultrafast fiber laser,” Opt. Lett. 18, 2734–2736 (2006).
[Crossref]

Leuchs, G.

S. Spaelter, M. Boehm, M. Burk, B. Mikulla, R. Fluck, I.D. Jung, G. Zhang, U. Keller, A. Sizmann, and G. Leuchs, “Self-starting soliton-modelocked femtosecond Cr(4+):YAG laser using an antiresonant Fabry-Perot saturable absorber,” Appl. Phys. B 65, 335–338 (1997).
[Crossref]

Lim, H.

Mikulla, B.

S. Spaelter, M. Boehm, M. Burk, B. Mikulla, R. Fluck, I.D. Jung, G. Zhang, U. Keller, A. Sizmann, and G. Leuchs, “Self-starting soliton-modelocked femtosecond Cr(4+):YAG laser using an antiresonant Fabry-Perot saturable absorber,” Appl. Phys. B 65, 335–338 (1997).
[Crossref]

Minelly, J.D.

Monberg, E.

Nelson, L.E.

H.A. Haus, K. Tamura, L.E. Nelson, and E.P. Ippen, “Stretched-Pulse Additive Pulse Mode-Locking in Fiber Ring Lasers: Theory and Experiment,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 11, 591–598 (1995).
[Crossref]

Nicholson, J.W.

Okhotnikov, O.G.

Prochnow, O.

A. Ruehl, O. Prochnow, M. Engelbrecht, D. Wandt, and D. Kracht, “Similariton fiber laser with photonic bandgap fiber for dispersion control,” Opt. Lett. 32, 1084–1086 (2007).
[Crossref] [PubMed]

A. Ruehl, O. Prochnow, D. Wandt, D. Kracht, B. Burgoyne, N. Godbout, and S. Lacroix, “Dynamics of parabolic pulses in an ultrafast fiber laser,” Opt. Lett. 18, 2734–2736 (2006).
[Crossref]

A. Ruehl, O. Prochnow, D. Wandt, and D. Kracht, “Photonic bandgap fiber for dispersion management of simi-laritons around 1μm,” in Conference on Laser and Electro-Optics, Cleo 2006 (Optical Society of America, 2006), paper JWB68.

Ramachandran, S.

Renninger, W.

Ruehl, A.

A. Ruehl, O. Prochnow, M. Engelbrecht, D. Wandt, and D. Kracht, “Similariton fiber laser with photonic bandgap fiber for dispersion control,” Opt. Lett. 32, 1084–1086 (2007).
[Crossref] [PubMed]

A. Ruehl, O. Prochnow, D. Wandt, D. Kracht, B. Burgoyne, N. Godbout, and S. Lacroix, “Dynamics of parabolic pulses in an ultrafast fiber laser,” Opt. Lett. 18, 2734–2736 (2006).
[Crossref]

A. Ruehl, O. Prochnow, D. Wandt, and D. Kracht, “Photonic bandgap fiber for dispersion management of simi-laritons around 1μm,” in Conference on Laser and Electro-Optics, Cleo 2006 (Optical Society of America, 2006), paper JWB68.

Sizmann, A.

S. Spaelter, M. Boehm, M. Burk, B. Mikulla, R. Fluck, I.D. Jung, G. Zhang, U. Keller, A. Sizmann, and G. Leuchs, “Self-starting soliton-modelocked femtosecond Cr(4+):YAG laser using an antiresonant Fabry-Perot saturable absorber,” Appl. Phys. B 65, 335–338 (1997).
[Crossref]

Sosnowski, T.

Spaelter, S.

S. Spaelter, M. Boehm, M. Burk, B. Mikulla, R. Fluck, I.D. Jung, G. Zhang, U. Keller, A. Sizmann, and G. Leuchs, “Self-starting soliton-modelocked femtosecond Cr(4+):YAG laser using an antiresonant Fabry-Perot saturable absorber,” Appl. Phys. B 65, 335–338 (1997).
[Crossref]

Tamura, K.

H.A. Haus, K. Tamura, L.E. Nelson, and E.P. Ippen, “Stretched-Pulse Additive Pulse Mode-Locking in Fiber Ring Lasers: Theory and Experiment,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 11, 591–598 (1995).
[Crossref]

H.A. Haus, E.P. Ippen, and K. Tamura, “Additive pulse mode locking in fiber lasers,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 30, 200–208 (1994).
[Crossref]

Vienne, G.G.

Wandt, D.

A. Ruehl, O. Prochnow, M. Engelbrecht, D. Wandt, and D. Kracht, “Similariton fiber laser with photonic bandgap fiber for dispersion control,” Opt. Lett. 32, 1084–1086 (2007).
[Crossref] [PubMed]

A. Ruehl, O. Prochnow, D. Wandt, D. Kracht, B. Burgoyne, N. Godbout, and S. Lacroix, “Dynamics of parabolic pulses in an ultrafast fiber laser,” Opt. Lett. 18, 2734–2736 (2006).
[Crossref]

A. Ruehl, O. Prochnow, D. Wandt, and D. Kracht, “Photonic bandgap fiber for dispersion management of simi-laritons around 1μm,” in Conference on Laser and Electro-Optics, Cleo 2006 (Optical Society of America, 2006), paper JWB68.

Welling, H.

P. Adel, M. Auerbach, C. Fallnich, and H. Welling, “Super-stretched, mode-locked Yb3+-fiber laser with 33 nm bandwidth and 56 nJ pulse energy,” in Advanced Solid-State Lasers, OSA Technical Digest (Optical Society of America, Washington DC, 2001), pp. 221–223.

Wise, F.

Wise, F.W.

J.R. Buckley, F.W. Wise, F.O. Ilday, and T. Sosnowski, “Femtosecond fiber laser with energies above 10 nJ,” Opt. Lett. 30, 1888–1890 (2005).
[Crossref] [PubMed]

F.Ö. Ilday, J.R. Buckley, W.G. Clark, and F.W. Wise, “Self-Similar Evolution of Parabolic Pulses in a Laser,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 213902 (2004).
[Crossref] [PubMed]

Wisk, P.

Yan, M.F.

Zhang, G.

S. Spaelter, M. Boehm, M. Burk, B. Mikulla, R. Fluck, I.D. Jung, G. Zhang, U. Keller, A. Sizmann, and G. Leuchs, “Self-starting soliton-modelocked femtosecond Cr(4+):YAG laser using an antiresonant Fabry-Perot saturable absorber,” Appl. Phys. B 65, 335–338 (1997).
[Crossref]

Appl. Phys. B (1)

S. Spaelter, M. Boehm, M. Burk, B. Mikulla, R. Fluck, I.D. Jung, G. Zhang, U. Keller, A. Sizmann, and G. Leuchs, “Self-starting soliton-modelocked femtosecond Cr(4+):YAG laser using an antiresonant Fabry-Perot saturable absorber,” Appl. Phys. B 65, 335–338 (1997).
[Crossref]

IEEE J. Quantum Electron. (3)

H.A. Haus, E.P. Ippen, and K. Tamura, “Additive pulse mode locking in fiber lasers,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 30, 200–208 (1994).
[Crossref]

R. Herda and O.G. Okhotnikov, “Dispersion Compensation-Free Fiber Laser Mode-Locked and Stabilized by High-Contrast Saturable Absorber Mirror,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 40, 893–899 (2004).
[Crossref]

H.A. Haus, K. Tamura, L.E. Nelson, and E.P. Ippen, “Stretched-Pulse Additive Pulse Mode-Locking in Fiber Ring Lasers: Theory and Experiment,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 11, 591–598 (1995).
[Crossref]

Opt. Express (4)

Opt. Lett. (5)

Phys. Rev. Lett. (1)

F.Ö. Ilday, J.R. Buckley, W.G. Clark, and F.W. Wise, “Self-Similar Evolution of Parabolic Pulses in a Laser,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 213902 (2004).
[Crossref] [PubMed]

Other (4)

I. Hartl, G. Imeshev, G.C. Cho, and M.E. Fermann, “Ultra-compact dispersion compensated femtosecond fiber oscillators and amplifiers,” in Conference on Laser and Electro-Optics, Cleo 2005 (Optical Society of America, 2005), paper CThG1.

A. Ruehl, O. Prochnow, D. Wandt, and D. Kracht, “Photonic bandgap fiber for dispersion management of simi-laritons around 1μm,” in Conference on Laser and Electro-Optics, Cleo 2006 (Optical Society of America, 2006), paper JWB68.

Datasheet of SAM-1040-40-x, Batop GmbH, http://www.batop.de.

P. Adel, M. Auerbach, C. Fallnich, and H. Welling, “Super-stretched, mode-locked Yb3+-fiber laser with 33 nm bandwidth and 56 nJ pulse energy,” in Advanced Solid-State Lasers, OSA Technical Digest (Optical Society of America, Washington DC, 2001), pp. 221–223.

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Figures (4)

Fig. 1.
Fig. 1. Schematic of the fiber ring cavity. PC: polarization controller, SBR: fiber coupled saturable Bragg-reflector, WDM: wavelength division multiplexer; ISO: fiber coupled isolator, PBS: fiber coupled polarization beam splitter.
Fig. 2.
Fig. 2. (a) Measured output power in respect to pump power with a mode-locking threshold of 145 mW (left) and (b) measured output spectrum of a similariton on a logarithmic scale and a linear scale (inset) centered at 1028 nm with a FWHM of 4.2 nm.
Fig. 3.
Fig. 3. (a) Measured photodetector signal and (b) RF-spectrum from 0 MHz to 1 GHz.
Fig. 4.
Fig. 4. (a) Measured second order autocorrelation of the output pulses with an autocorrelation width of 14 ps, of the dechirped output pulses with an autocorrelation width of 873 fs ((b), solid curve) and the calculated autocorrelation function of the transform limited pulse ((b), dashed curve).

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