Abstract

The principle of wavelength-scanning digital interference holography is applied to three-dimensional imaging of a small biological specimen. The images are reconstructed from a number of holograms digitally recorded while the wavelengths are varied at regular intervals, and the numerical interference of the multiple three-dimensional hologram fields results in tomographic images with narrow axial resolution. An animated three-dimensional model of the object is constructed from the tomographic images.

© Optical Society of America

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References

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  1. R.A. Robb, Three-Dimensional Biomedical Imaging, (Wiley, John & Sons, New York, 1997).
  2. C.J.R. Sheppard and D.M. Shotton, Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy, (Springer, New York, 1997).
  3. D. Huang, E.A. Swanson, C.P. Lin, et al., "Optical coherence tomography," Science 254, 1178-81 (1991); A.M. Rollins, R. Ung-Arunyawee, A. Chak, et al., "Real-time in vivo imaging of human gastrointestinal ultrastructure using endoscopic optical coherence tomography with a novel efficient interferometer design," Opt. Lett. 24, 1358-60 (1999).
    [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  4. P. Hariharan, Optical Holography, (Cambridge U. Press, Cambridge, 1996
  5. L. Yaroslavsky and M. Eden, Fundamentals of Digital Optics, (Birkh�user, Boston, 1996).
  6. E. Cuche, F. Bevilacqua, and C. Depeursinge, "Digital holography for quantitative phase-contrast imaging," Opt. Lett. 24, 291-3 (1999); S. Seebacher, W. Osten, and W. Jyptner, "Measuring shape and deformation of small objects using digital holography," Proc. SPIE, 3479, 104-15 (1998).
    [CrossRef]
  7. S. Trester, "Computer simulated holography and computer generated holograms," Am. J. Phys. 64, 472-8 (1996); R. Piestun, J. Shamir, B. Wesskamp, and O. Brynagdahl, "On-axis computer-generated holograms for three-dimensional display," Opt. Lett. 22, 922-4 (1997).
    [CrossRef]
  8. T.C. Poon, K.B. Doh, B.W. Schilling, "Three-dimensional microscopy by optical scanning holography," Opt. Eng. 34, 1338-44 (1995);T. Zhang and I. Yamaguchi, "Three-dimensional microscopy with phase-shifting digital holography," Opt. Lett. 23, 1221-3 (1998).
    [CrossRef]
  9. M.K. Kim, "Wavelength-scanning digital interference holography for optical section imaging," Opt. Lett. 24, 1693-5 (1999).
    [CrossRef]
  10. E. Arons, D. Dilworth, M. Shih, and P.C. Sun, "Use of Fourier synthesis holography to image through inhomogeneities," Opt. Lett. 18, 1852-4 (1993).
    [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  11. F. Le Clerc and L. Collot, "Numerical heterodyne holography with two-dimensional photodetector arrays," Opt. Lett. 25, 716-8 (2000).
    [CrossRef]

Other (11)

R.A. Robb, Three-Dimensional Biomedical Imaging, (Wiley, John & Sons, New York, 1997).

C.J.R. Sheppard and D.M. Shotton, Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy, (Springer, New York, 1997).

D. Huang, E.A. Swanson, C.P. Lin, et al., "Optical coherence tomography," Science 254, 1178-81 (1991); A.M. Rollins, R. Ung-Arunyawee, A. Chak, et al., "Real-time in vivo imaging of human gastrointestinal ultrastructure using endoscopic optical coherence tomography with a novel efficient interferometer design," Opt. Lett. 24, 1358-60 (1999).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

P. Hariharan, Optical Holography, (Cambridge U. Press, Cambridge, 1996

L. Yaroslavsky and M. Eden, Fundamentals of Digital Optics, (Birkh�user, Boston, 1996).

E. Cuche, F. Bevilacqua, and C. Depeursinge, "Digital holography for quantitative phase-contrast imaging," Opt. Lett. 24, 291-3 (1999); S. Seebacher, W. Osten, and W. Jyptner, "Measuring shape and deformation of small objects using digital holography," Proc. SPIE, 3479, 104-15 (1998).
[CrossRef]

S. Trester, "Computer simulated holography and computer generated holograms," Am. J. Phys. 64, 472-8 (1996); R. Piestun, J. Shamir, B. Wesskamp, and O. Brynagdahl, "On-axis computer-generated holograms for three-dimensional display," Opt. Lett. 22, 922-4 (1997).
[CrossRef]

T.C. Poon, K.B. Doh, B.W. Schilling, "Three-dimensional microscopy by optical scanning holography," Opt. Eng. 34, 1338-44 (1995);T. Zhang and I. Yamaguchi, "Three-dimensional microscopy with phase-shifting digital holography," Opt. Lett. 23, 1221-3 (1998).
[CrossRef]

M.K. Kim, "Wavelength-scanning digital interference holography for optical section imaging," Opt. Lett. 24, 1693-5 (1999).
[CrossRef]

E. Arons, D. Dilworth, M. Shih, and P.C. Sun, "Use of Fourier synthesis holography to image through inhomogeneities," Opt. Lett. 18, 1852-4 (1993).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

F. Le Clerc and L. Collot, "Numerical heterodyne holography with two-dimensional photodetector arrays," Opt. Lett. 25, 716-8 (2000).
[CrossRef]

Supplementary Material (4)

» Media 1: MOV (361 KB)     
» Media 2: MOV (314 KB)     
» Media 3: MOV (332 KB)     
» Media 4: MOV (556 KB)     

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Figures (6)

Fig. 1.
Fig. 1.

The apparatus for digital interference holography. RDL: ring dye laser; F1 and F2: neutral density filters; BX: beam expander and spatial filter; BS1 and BS2: beam splitters; REF: reference beam; OBJ: object beam; S: camera’s focal plane; LO: magnifying lens; C: digital camera; Z1: object to hologram distance

Fig. 2.
Fig. 2.

a) Direct camera image of the insect under laser illumination. The eyes, the mouthpiece, and the front two or three legs are visible. b) Numerically reconstructed image from one hologram. c) Image accumulated from the 20 holograms, as described in the text.

Fig. 3.
Fig. 3.

Digitally recorded optical fields, showing 1×1 mm details out of 4.8×4.8 mm frames: a) hologram, HH*, b) object, OO*, and c) reference, RR*.

Fig. 4.
Fig. 4.

(QuickTime, 504k) The animation shows a z-y cross section of the 3D reconstructed field at x=-1.3 mm, as the twenty 3D arrays are added in digital interference holography.

Fig. 5.
Fig. 5.

a) (QuickTime, 504k) x-y cross sections of the accumulated array at various axial distances z. b) (QuickTime, 504k) z-y cross sections of the accumulated array at various x-values starting from left end of the head, x=1.84 mm, to near the middle of the head, x=0.52 mm.

Fig. 6.
Fig. 6.

(QuickTime, 756k) An animated 3D reconstruction of the insect’s illuminated surface. (Here the insect is facing upward, the vertical being the z-axis.)

Equations (4)

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E k ( Q ) P d 3 r P A ( P ) exp ( i k r P ) .
E ( Q ) k P d 3 r P A ( P ) exp ( i k r P ) P d 3 r P A ( P ) δ ( r P r Q ) A ( Q ) .
E ( x , y ; z ) = exp [ ik 2 z ( x 2 + y 2 ) ] F { E 0 ( x 0 , y 0 ) S ( x 0 , y 0 ; z ) } [ κ x , κ y ]
S ( x , y ; z ) = ik z exp [ ikz + ik 2 z ( x 2 + y 2 ) ] ,

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