Abstract

The energy efficiency and compactness of an illumination system are two main concerns in illumination design for extended sources. In this paper, we present two methods to design compact, ultra efficient aspherical lenses for extended Lambertian sources in two-dimensional geometry. The light rays are directed by using two aspherical surfaces in the first method and one aspherical surface along with an optimized parabola in the second method. The principles and procedures of each design method are introduced in detail. Three examples are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of these two methods in terms of performance and capacity in designing compact, ultra efficient aspherical lenses. The comparisons made between the two proposed methods indicate that the second method is much simpler and easier to be implemented, and has an excellent extensibility to three-dimensional designs.

© 2016 Optical Society of America

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References

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    [Crossref] [PubMed]
  14. R. Wu, H. Hua, P. Benítez, and J. C. Miñano, “Direct design of aspherical lenses for extended non-Lambertian sources in two-dimensional geometry,” Opt. Lett. 40(13), 3037–3040 (2015).
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2016 (1)

2015 (2)

2013 (3)

2010 (1)

2008 (1)

2002 (1)

1995 (1)

P. T. Ong, J. M. Gordon, A. Rabl, and W. Cai, “Tailored edge-ray designs for uniform illumination of distant targets,” Opt. Eng. 134, 1726–1737 (1995).

1994 (1)

1993 (1)

Bäuerle, A.

Benítez, P.

Bruneton, A.

Cai, W.

P. T. Ong, J. M. Gordon, A. Rabl, and W. Cai, “Tailored edge-ray designs for uniform illumination of distant targets,” Opt. Eng. 134, 1726–1737 (1995).

Cassarly, W. J.

Ding, Y.

Feng, Z.

Fournier, F. R.

Gong, M.

Gordon, J. M.

P. T. Ong, J. M. Gordon, A. Rabl, and W. Cai, “Tailored edge-ray designs for uniform illumination of distant targets,” Opt. Eng. 134, 1726–1737 (1995).

A. Rabl and J. M. Gordon, “Reflector design for illumination with extended sources: the basic solutions,” Appl. Opt. 33(25), 6012–6021 (1994).
[Crossref] [PubMed]

Gu, P. F.

Hua, H.

Huang, L.

Jin, G.

Li, H.

Liu, P.

Liu, X.

Loosen, P.

Meuret, Y.

Miñano, J. C.

Muschaweck, J.

Ong, P. T.

P. T. Ong, J. M. Gordon, A. Rabl, and W. Cai, “Tailored edge-ray designs for uniform illumination of distant targets,” Opt. Eng. 134, 1726–1737 (1995).

Qin, Y.

Rabl, A.

P. T. Ong, J. M. Gordon, A. Rabl, and W. Cai, “Tailored edge-ray designs for uniform illumination of distant targets,” Opt. Eng. 134, 1726–1737 (1995).

A. Rabl and J. M. Gordon, “Reflector design for illumination with extended sources: the basic solutions,” Appl. Opt. 33(25), 6012–6021 (1994).
[Crossref] [PubMed]

Ries, H.

Rolland, J. P.

Stollenwerk, J.

Wester, R.

Winston, R.

Wu, R.

Xu, L.

Zhang, Y.

Zheng, Z.

Zheng, Z. R.

Appl. Opt. (1)

J. Opt. Soc. Am. A (2)

Opt. Eng. (1)

P. T. Ong, J. M. Gordon, A. Rabl, and W. Cai, “Tailored edge-ray designs for uniform illumination of distant targets,” Opt. Eng. 134, 1726–1737 (1995).

Opt. Express (5)

Opt. Lett. (3)

Other (3)

M. Hernandez, “Development of nonimaging optical concentrators,” PhD dissertation 04–030, UPM, 2003.

R. Winston, J. C. Miñano, and P. Benítez, Nonimaging Optics (Elsevier, 2005).

V. I. Oliker, “Mathematical aspects of design of beam shaping surfaces in geometrical optics,” in Trends in Nonlinear Analysis, M. Kirkilionis, S. Krömker, R. Rannacher and F. Tomi, eds. (Springer, 2000), pp. 193–224.

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Figures (5)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1 The limitation of one single surface in illumination design for extended light sources. The method presented in [13] is used to design the aspherical surface. The light source is a Lambertian line source with the length of the source being 3mm and the target intensity is defined as It(β) = 1/cos2β,(−40°≤β≤40°). (a) Two lens profiles with the z-coordinates of the vertex of the lens being 6.22mm and 60.02mm, respectively. (b) The change of the energy efficiency of the lens with the change of the z-coordinate of the vertex of the lens. Trade-offs usually need to be made between the compactness and energy efficiency of a design.
Fig. 2
Fig. 2 The geometrical design layout of the aspherical lens. (a) Define the initial curves, (b) calculate new portions on the exit surface profile, and (c) calculate new portions on the entrance surface profile.
Fig. 3
Fig. 3 Demonstration of the first design method. (a) The actual intensity distribution, (b) the distribution of the direction angle of the outgoing rays in the one surface design, (c) the lens profiles, and (d) the distribution of the direction angle of the outgoing ray in the two-surface design.
Fig. 4
Fig. 4 Demonstration of the second design method. (a) The actual intensity distribution, (b) two aspherical lenses designed by these two methods, the distribution of the direction angle of the outgoing rays obtained from (c) the first method, and (d) the second method. rms1 = 0.0011.
Fig. 5
Fig. 5 Design results of the two examples. (a) The actual intensity distribution in the second example; (b) two aspherical lenses designed by the two proposed methods; the distribution of the direction angle of the outgoing rays obtained from (c) the first method and (d) the second method. zC = 7mm and rms1 = 0.0036. (e) The actual intensity distribution in the third example; (f) two aspherical lenses designed by the two proposed methods; the distribution of the direction angle of the outgoing rays obtained from (g) the first method and (h) the second method. zC = 5.5mm and rms1 = 0.0011.

Tables (2)

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Table 1 Design parameters of the three examples.

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Table 2 Design results of the three examples.

Equations (5)

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D θ min θ max cosθd θ= β min β max I t ( β ) d β,
Example 1: I t ( β )= K 1 / cos 2 β , 4 0 o β4 0 o .
rm s 1 = 1 M 1 k=1 M 1 ( β ak β max β max ) 2 ,
Example 2: I t ( β )= K 2 cos 2 β, 4 0 o β4 0 o ,
Example 3: I t ( β )= K 3 , 5 0 o β5 0 o .

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