Abstract

Optical flow switching (OFS) has been proposed as a simple and cost-effective transport technology for users with large transactions (>1 second). In previous studies, a fast wavelength reservation method was deployed for flow transmission in OFS-based networks. However, reserving a single wavelength for users with small transactions encounters a very common problem: inefficient wavelength utilization. In this paper, a flow transmission cycle is introduced to each wavelength, and each cycle consists of multiple slots, so that flows of different transactions can be multiplexed onto a single wavelength. It is assumed that inter-metropolitan area network (MAN) traffic is transported over wide area network (WAN). A global time-shift scheduling methodology taking into account propagation delays in MAN is designed to avoid potential contentions occurring among different flows which are carried by the same wavelength in WAN. The contributions of this paper are, first it provides a new OFS network architecture which can achieve better throughput and average wavelength utilization performance without losing the feature of simple transport structure provided by OFS; second, it is the first time that issues of how OFS networks are managed and controlled are addressed from a system point of view.

© 2011 OSA

Full Article  |  PDF Article

References

  • View by:
  • |
  • |
  • |

  1. Cisco Systems, Inc., “Approaching the Zettabyte Era,” White Paper, June 16, 2008.
  2. L. G. Roberts, “The Internet is broken,” IEEE Spectr. 46(7), 36–39 (2009).
  3. M. Zukerman, “Back to the future,” IEEE Commun. Mag. 47(11), 36–38 (2009).
    [CrossRef]
  4. G. Weichenberg, V. W. Chan, and M. Médard, “Design and Analysis of Optical Flow-Switched Networks,” J. Opt. Commun. Netw. 1(3), B81–B97 (2009).
    [CrossRef]
  5. V. W. S. Chan and Z. Lei, “Scalable control plane architecture for optical flow switched networks,” in Optical Fiber Communication Conference, OSA Technical Digest Series (Optical Society of America, 2011), paper OWP4.

2009 (3)

L. G. Roberts, “The Internet is broken,” IEEE Spectr. 46(7), 36–39 (2009).

M. Zukerman, “Back to the future,” IEEE Commun. Mag. 47(11), 36–38 (2009).
[CrossRef]

G. Weichenberg, V. W. Chan, and M. Médard, “Design and Analysis of Optical Flow-Switched Networks,” J. Opt. Commun. Netw. 1(3), B81–B97 (2009).
[CrossRef]

IEEE Commun. Mag. (1)

M. Zukerman, “Back to the future,” IEEE Commun. Mag. 47(11), 36–38 (2009).
[CrossRef]

IEEE Spectr. (1)

L. G. Roberts, “The Internet is broken,” IEEE Spectr. 46(7), 36–39 (2009).

J. Opt. Commun. Netw. (1)

Other (2)

V. W. S. Chan and Z. Lei, “Scalable control plane architecture for optical flow switched networks,” in Optical Fiber Communication Conference, OSA Technical Digest Series (Optical Society of America, 2011), paper OWP4.

Cisco Systems, Inc., “Approaching the Zettabyte Era,” White Paper, June 16, 2008.

Cited By

OSA participates in CrossRef's Cited-By Linking service. Citing articles from OSA journals and other participating publishers are listed here.

Alert me when this article is cited.


Figures (11)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

OFS-based Network Architecture.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

An example of tree-based topology for flow multiplexing.

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

Flow multiplexing example for inter-MAN traffic.

Fig. 4
Fig. 4

(a) an example of source MAN topology and its link propagation delay; (b) contention-free flow transmission by time shift.

Fig. 5
Fig. 5

An example of FA-table configuration.

Fig. 6
Fig. 6

Structure of the scheduler.

Fig. 7
Fig. 7

Procedures of processing a flow setup/termination request.

Fig. 8
Fig. 8

Evaluated tree-based network topology.

Fig. 9
Fig. 9

Throughput performance in terms of (a) flow length, (b) update interval and (c) number of flow slots per cycle.

Fig. 10
Fig. 10

Impact of demanded bandwidth on (a) service latency/delay, (b) blocking rate, (c) throughput performance, and (d) average utilized wavelengths.

Fig. 11
Fig. 11

Impact of optical switching speed on network throughput.

Equations (7)

Equations on this page are rendered with MathJax. Learn more.

T DN( k ) = t 0 ( l=1 L δ lk D l +( n k 1 ) T f ).
δ lk = { 0, otherwise. 1, if the l-th link is traversed, .
F ofs = F cycle B ofs B w .
Throughput= k=1 W O k W×M .
Delay= i=1 F ( T i S T i A ) F .
Blocking= N B N S .
C busy = j=1 W T j M .

Metrics