Abstract

We present a new method of time-resolved Mueller matrix imaging polarimetry for spatial and temporal characterization of the polarization effects in backscattering from turbid media. The technique allows measuring the time evolution of spatially varying polarization patterns of diffusely backscattered light with picosecond resolution. A series of time-resolved polarization patterns are obtained at various time delays, are analyzed in sequence, and used to separate the polarimetric contributions of different scattering paths. Specific features of the 2D Mueller matrix components corresponding to light backscattered from colloidal suspensions were determined and characterized. The temporally-and spatially-resolved measurements permit detailed analysis of the changes in the magnitude, sign, and the general symmetry properties of Mueller matrix components.

© 2004 Optical Society of America

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References

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Am. J. Phys. (2)

W.S. Bickel, W.M. Bailey, �??Stokes vectors, Mueller matrices, and polarized scattered light,�?? Am. J. Phys. 53, 468-478 (1985).
[CrossRef]

W. S. Bickel, A.J. Watkins, and G.Videen, �??The light-scattering Mueller matrix elements for Rayleigh, Rayleigh�??Gans, and Mie spheres,�?? Am. J. Phys. 55, 559-561 (1987).
[CrossRef]

Appl. Opt. (5)

Opt. Express (2)

Opt. Lett. (2)

Other (1)

H. C. Van de Hulst. Light Scattering by Small Particles(John Wiley & Sons, NewYork, NY, 1957), 47.

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Figures (10)

Fig. 1.
Fig. 1.

Schematic of experimental setup: QWP - rotating quarter wave plate, P - static polarizer, CCD - ultra-fast gated intensified camera system.

Fig. 2.
Fig. 2.

Schematic of the geometry used in the experiment.

Fig. 3.
Fig. 3.

Diffuse backscattering Mueller matrix components corresponding to a suspension of randomly distributed silica spheres (diameter 200 nm) with μ s = 0.32 cm -1. The gray scale bar is adjusted so that black corresponds to negative and white represents positive values of the matrix component. Gray color means “no light” or component change by an order of magnitude. Gate delay time is 100 ps.

Fig. 4.
Fig. 4.

Diffuse backscattering Mueller matrix components corresponding to a suspension of randomly distributed silica spheres (diameter 200 nm) with μ s = 0.32 cm -1. The gray scale bar is adjusted so that black corresponds to negative and white represents positive values of the matrix component. Gray color means “no light” or component change by an order of magnitude. Gate delay time is 200 ps.

Fig. 5.
Fig. 5.

Diffuse backscattering Mueller matrix components corresponding to a suspension of randomly distributed silica spheres (diameter 200 nm) with μ s = 0 32 cm -1. The gray scale bar is adjusted so that black corresponds to negative and white represents positive values of the matrix component. Gray color means “no light” or component change by an order of magnitude. Gate delay time is 325 ps.

Fig. 6.
Fig. 6.

Diffuse backscattering Mueller matrix components corresponding to a suspension of randomly distributed silica spheres (diameter 200 nm) with μ s = 0.32 cm -1. The gray scale bar is adjusted so that black corresponds to negative and white represents positive values of the matrix component. Gray color means “no light” or component change by an order of magnitude. Gate delay time is 425 ps.

Fig. 7.
Fig. 7.

Diffuse backscattering Mueller matrix components corresponding to a suspension of randomly distributed silica spheres (diameter 200 nm) with μ s = 0.32 cm -1. The gray scale bar is adjusted so that black corresponds to negative and white represents positive values of the matrix component. Gray color means “no light” or component change by an order of magnitude. Time integrated matrix (integration for 31 time-steps).

Fig. 8.
Fig. 8.

Diffuse backscattering Mueller matrix components corresponding to a suspension of randomly distributed silica spheres (diameter 1500 nm) with μ s = 0.32 cm -1. The gray scale bar is adjusted so that black corresponds to negative and white represents positive values of the matrix component. Gray color means “no light” or component change by an order of magnitude. Gate delay time is 650 ps.

Fig. 9.
Fig. 9.

Diffuse backscattering Mueller matrix components corresponding to a suspension of randomly distributed silica spheres (diameter 1500 nm) with μ s = 0.32 cm -1. The gray scale bar is adjusted so that black corresponds to negative and white represents positive values of the matrix component. Gray color means “no light” or component change by an order of magnitude. Gate delay time is 950 ps.

Fig. 10.
Fig. 10.

Diffuse backscattering Mueller matrix components corresponding to a suspension of randomly distributed silica spheres (diameter 1500 nm) with μ s = 0.32 cm -1. The gray scale bar is adjusted so that black corresponds to negative and white represents positive values of the matrix component. Gray color means “no light” or component change by an order of magnitude. Time integrated matrix (integration for 31 time-steps).

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