Abstract

We investigate the electro-optical properties of polymer stabilized nematic liquid crystals produced by in situ photopolymerization technique using Gaussian laser beam. The distribution of refractive index in such structure under the action of a homogeneous electric field reveals a non-homogeneous lens-like character, approximately reproducing the intensity transverse distribution in the photopolymerizing beam.

© 2002 Optical Society of America

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References

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Appl. Opt. (1)

Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. (3)

T. Nose, S. Sato, �??Optical properties of a liquid crystal microlens with a symmetric electrode structure,�?? Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 30, L2110-L2112 (1991).
[CrossRef]

T. Nose, S. Masuda, S. Sato, �??A liquid crystal microlens with hole-patterned electrodes on both substrates,�?? Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 31, 1643-1946 (1992).
[CrossRef]

S. Masuda, T. Nose, S. Sato, �??Optical properties of a polymer-stabilized liquid crystal microlens,�?? Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 37, L1251-1253 (1998).
[CrossRef]

Liq. Cryst. (2)

R. A. M. Hikmet, H. L. P. Poels, �??An investigation of anisotropic gels for switchable recordings,�?? Liq. Cryst. 27, 17-25 (2000).
[CrossRef]

D. E. Luccetta, O. Francescangeli, L. Lucchetti, F. Simoni, �??Droplet-size distribution gradient induced by laser curing in polymer dispersed liquid crystals,�?? Liq. Cryst. 28, 1793-1798 (2001).
[CrossRef]

Opt. Commun. (1)

L. G. Commander, S. E. Day, D. R. Selviah, �??Variable focal length microlenses,�?? Opt. Commun. 177, 157-170 (2000).
[CrossRef]

Opt. Express (1)

Opt. Lett. (3)

Phys. Rev. E (1)

R. A. M. Hikmet, H. M. J. Boots, �??Domain structure and switching behavior of anisotropic gels,�?? Phys. Rev. E 51, 5824-5831 (1995).
[CrossRef]

Sov. Tech. Phys. Lett. (1)

R. B. Alaverdyan, V. E. Drnoyan, T. N. Smirnova, S. M. Arakelyan, Yu. S. Chilingaryan, �??Nonlinear optical effects and 'frozen-in' structures in liquid-crystal photopolymerizing compositions,�?? Sov. Tech. Phys. Lett. 18, 48-52 (1992).

Z. Naturforsch. (1)

H. Gruler, T. J. Sheffer, G. Meier, �??Elastic constants of nematic liquid crystals. I. Theory of the normal deformation,�?? Z. Naturforsch. 27a, 966-976 (1972).

Other (2)

T. Galstian, A. Tork, �??Photopolymerizable composition sensitive to light in a green to infrared region of the optical spectrum,�?? U.S. patent 6,398,981 (June 4, 2002).

G. P. Crawford, S. Zumer, eds., Liquid Crystals in Complex Geometries (Taylor&Francis, London, 1996).

Supplementary Material (1)

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Figures (5)

Fig. 1.
Fig. 1.

Experimental set-up. Dashed lines denote elements used in polymerization process only; solid lines denote those used during the electro-optical measurements.

Fig. 2.
Fig. 2.

Light transmission as a function of the probe beam position in the sample under different values of applied voltage U. (a) before polymerization; (b) after polymerization; (c) before and after polymerization for U=1.87 V. Thickness of the cell is 4μm.

Fig. 3.
Fig. 3.

Induced maximal phase difference δF in the cell with thickness of 4μm versus applied voltage.

Fig. 4.
Fig. 4.

Polymerised area of the sample viewed between crossed polarizers of microscope at different values of applied voltage. The initial optical axis of the cell is oriented at 45° with respect to the polarizers. Thickness of the cell is 5μm.

Fig. 5.
Fig. 5.

Field induced transformation in the optical image of the lens-like distributed polymer-stabilized liquid crystals. The voltage is increased from 0.5V to 2.65V and then is decreased to 0.5V again. The initial optical axis of the cell is oriented at 450 with respect to the crossed polarizers. Thickness of the cell is 5μm. [Media 1]

Equations (1)

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I = I max sin 2 ( φ / 2 ) .

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