Abstract

A hypothesis is put forth that the convergence of the projections of an object onto the centers of zones with high spatial resolution of the retinas of the left and right eyes is achieved using the signal obtained as a result of averaging the signals over all the binocular neurons of the horopter. This assumption is supported by the fact that the visual system can reliably detect retinal disparities that are much smaller than the diameter of most retina photoreceptors. It is shown that the algorithm of operation of the human visual system when observing a real three-dimensional scene differs significantly from the algorithm of its operation when observing a stereoscopic image of the same scene. As a result of this difference, conflict arises between estimates of the distance to the objects of the scene that the visual system receives from various visual mechanisms, which leads to strong distortions of stereoscopic images.

© 2018 Optical Society of America

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