Abstract

In this paper, the results of experiments are presented in which the impact of interactive virtual environments combined with the performance of a cognitive task was estimated on the visual system of a healthy observer. Monitors of two angular sizes were used to present the images. To estimate the impacts of the environments, measurements of visual evoked potentials were taken during the perception of two types of images containing low-frequency and high-frequency parts of the spatial frequency spectrum. Measurements were performed both before and after interaction with the virtual environment. It is established that using a screen of a small angular size enhances the analysis of high-frequency images at the early stages of visual information processing. When using a large angular size screen, the processing of both types of image improves at both the early and late stages of analysis. It is assumed that the changes in the evoked potentials are related to the difference in the stimulation of the central and peripheral fields of vision when the angular size of the screen varies.

© 2018 Optical Society of America

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