Abstract

A technique and a hardware–software complex have been developed for simultaneously recording the electrical activity of the brains of two people. It is shown that statistically significant differences appear between the various regimes and interaction conditions of the interlocutors in all frequency ranges except for the alpha range if the interlocutors are placed back-to-back. It is shown that mimicry plays a very important role in social interaction. Under definite conditions, mimicry can appear both in the role of noise, smoothing out the differences between the various interaction regimes, and on the other hand, emphasizing and amplifying these differences.

© 2018 Optical Society of America

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