Abstract

Astigmatic surfaces are usually obtained when commercial grinding machines designed for the production of surfaces of revolution are used. See R. Aspden et al. [Appl. Opt.11, 2739 (1972)] and A. S. Savel’ev and A. P. Bogdanov [Sov. J. Opt. Tech.52, 294 (1985)]. The dragging force applied by the rotating glass on a fixed tool fabricated from Teflon was measured in order to find an explanation for this phenomenon. It was detected that, regardless of the grinding machine, the rotational speed of the glass, and the radial position of the tool, the dragging force is invariably periodic and synchronous with the rotation of the glass. Experiments were carried out in three different optical shops. In addition, numerical modelling was carried out, as a result of which it was detected that a periodic frictional force, synchronized with the rotation of the glass, induces astigmatic wear. It was also concluded that a periodic frictional force can result from errors in parallelness between the surfaces of the glass and/or the axis of rotation of the grinding machine.

© 2015 Optical Society of America

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