Abstract

In short-range optical detection-and-ranging systems in which the maximum distances to the objects are 10–15 m, it becomes possible to reduce the required radiation energy or the size of the optical receiver system while maintaining the specified detection-probability characteristics by noise synchronization of the emission time. The signal in this case is received on the interval between noise bursts—i.e., on a time interval in which a false alarm is less probable. This article presents a statistical analysis of the probability distributions of the noise intervals, used as the basis for defining the principle by which the detection-probability characteristics are calculated. It is shown that, when the threshold/noise ratio equals unity, the radiation energy required to ensure a skip probability equal to 0.01 is almost a factor of 3 less than in classical detection, and, when the threshold/noise ratio equals 2, it will be a factor of 23 less.

© 2014 Optical Society of America

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