Abstract

Since the discovery of semiconducting monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides, a variety of experimental and theoretical studies have been carried out seeking to understand the intrinsic exciton population recombination and valley relaxation dynamics. Reports of the exciton decay time range from hundreds of femtoseconds to ten nanoseconds, while the valley depolarization time can exceed one nanosecond. At present, however, a consensus on the microscopic mechanisms governing exciton radiative and non-radiative recombination is lacking. The strong exciton oscillator strength resulting in up to 20% absorption for a single monolayer points to ultrafast radiative recombination. However, the low quantum yield and large variance in the reported lifetimes suggest that non-radiative Auger-type processes obscure the intrinsic exciton radiative lifetime. In either case, the electron–hole exchange interaction plays an important role in the exciton spin and valley dynamics. In this paper, we review the experiments and theory that have led to these conclusions and comment on future experiments that could complement our current understanding.

Full Article  |  PDF Article

Corrections

9 May 2016: A correction was made to the title.


OSA Recommended Articles
Ultrabroadband time-resolved spectroscopy in novel types of condensed matter

Chih-Wei Luo, Yu-Ting Wang, Atsushi Yabushita, and Takayoshi Kobayashi
Optica 3(1) 82-92 (2016)

Intrinsic and extrinsic processes in photoluminescence, reflectivity, and spin dynamics of GaAs quantum wells

Vivek Srinivas, Yung Jui Chen, and Colin E. C. Wood
J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 13(5) 989-993 (1996)

Substrate engineering for high-quality emission of free and localized excitons from atomic monolayers in hybrid architectures

Oliver Iff, Yu-Ming He, Nils Lundt, Sebastian Stoll, Vasilij Baumann, Sven Höfling, and Christian Schneider
Optica 4(6) 669-673 (2017)

References

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Citation lists with outbound citation links are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Cited By

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Cited by links are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Figures (8)

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Figure files are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Tables (1)

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Article tables are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Metrics

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Article level metrics are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription