Abstract

Transmission through two-dimensional photonic crystals (PhCs) with several (non)periodic line defects, each being created by removing a single row of rods, are studied with the emphasis put on angular selectivity. Most of the observed features appear due to a hybrid mechanism, which is realized as a common effect of the splitting of a transmission peak being the result of peculiar coupling of individual defect-mode resonators, and the angle-dependent guided-wave cavity effect, which depends on the chosen dispersion. In the case of zero-order propagation, the role of periodic location of line defects is demonstrated. A rich variety of effects can be obtained in the angle domain within a rather narrow frequency range, which contains eigenfrequencies of defect modes. Peculiarities of the transmission peaks arising in the case of first-order propagation are considered in both angle and frequency domains. It is shown that the defect-mode related peaks can be close by to the peaks, which appear due to resonances within the pieces of PhC separated by line defects and their coupling. For the effects observed while two beams are propagating, the presence of multiple defects is rather critical than the periodicity of their location.

© 2008 Optical Society of America

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