Abstract

We describe a family of stimuli consisting of colored bars of different orientations, which, when presented in rapid succession, may elicit unambiguous motion perception. These stimuli permitted the isolation of directional spatiotemporal information extracted from oriented luminance clues, from nonoriented chromatic-plus-luminance clues, or, when the stimuli were presented under equiluminant conditions, from pure chromatic clues. As a general rule, matching of orientation induces weaker motion-detection performances than does matching of color. When the orientation clues are in competition with the chromatic ones, motion perception based on the former is always overridden by motion perception based on the latter. We indirectly isolated an oriented chromatic mechanism that also contributes to motion perception. We finally showed that, under equiluminant conditions, matching of orientation across different colors is inefficient in eliciting motion perception, either because motion information is extracted poorly across different chromatic channels or because such channels show little orientational selectivity. Because motion strength determined by each of the manipulated attributes follows different functions with the displacement (or velocity) of the stimuli, we propose the existence of three underlying mechanisms, a luminance mechanism, a chromatic-plus-luminance mechanism, and a pure chromatic mechanism, each of which provides motion information.

© 1989 Optical Society of America

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