Abstract

A multiple convolution (e.g., an image formed by convolving several individual components) is automatically deconvolvable, provided that its dimension (i.e., the number of variables of which it is a function) is greater than unity. This follows because the Fourier transform of a K-dimensional function (having compact support) is zero on continuous surfaces (here called zero sheets) of dimension (2K − 2) in a space that effectively has 2K dimensions. A number of important practical applications are transfigured by the concept of the zero sheet. Image restoration can be effected without prior knowledge of the point-spread function, i.e., blind deconvolution is possible even when only a single blurred image is given. It is in principle possible to remove some of the additive noise when the form of the point-spread function is known. Fourier phase can be retrieved directly, and, unlike for readily implementable iterative techniques, complex images can be handled as straightforwardly as real images.

© 1987 Optical Society of America

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