Abstract

Current models of human color vision only consider cone inputs at photopic light levels, yet it is unclear whether the recently discovered melanopsin-expressing intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) contribute to color perception. Using a lab-made five-primary photostimulator that can independently control the stimulations of rods, cones, and ipRGCs in human retina, we determined the observer’s unique white perception, an equilibrium point for signals arising from the opponent mechanisms of color vision, under different levels of melanopsin activation. We found changing melanopsin activation levels shifts the equilibrium point in the chromatic pathways. Our results suggest potential evidence for an impact of melanopsin activation on unique white perception and the existing color vision model for the periphery may need to be revised by incorporating melanopsin signaling.

© 2018 Optical Society of America

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