Abstract

On bright surrounds, red-green-balanced yellow targets become greenish brown with decreased target luminance, and red-green-balanced brown targets become reddish yellow with increased target luminance. These effects imply luminance- and/or contrast-dependent weighting of M- and L-cone signals in post-receptoral pathways. We show psychophysically that luminance contrast between the surround and the target is the primary determinant of the magnitude of red-green hue shift, requiring surround luminance at least twice the target luminance and increasing with further increases of surround/target contrast. There is a much smaller effect of absolute stimulus luminance, with dimmer stimuli showing slightly larger hue shifts. To evaluate a possible retinal origin of the changes in cone-signal weightings underlying the hue shift, we recorded spike responses from both ON- and OFF-center midget ganglion cells in peripheral primate retina. We found no evidence that the relative strength of L- and M-cone post-receptoral responses changed systematically with change of surround irradiance. Nor was there any systematic difference between ON- and OFF-subtypes. This suggests that the change in cone signal weighting occurs later in the visual system.

© 2018 Optical Society of America

Full Article  |  PDF Article
OSA Recommended Articles
Contrast-dependent red-green balance shifts depend on S-cone activity

Tanner DeLawyer, Melissa Tayon, Chia-li Yu, and Steven L. Buck
J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 35(4) B114-B121 (2018)

Dark versus bright equilibrium hues: rod and cone biases

Steven L. Buck and Tanner DeLawyer
J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 31(4) A75-A81 (2014)

The relationship between peripherally matched invariant hues and unique hues: a cone-contrast approach

Athanasios Panorgias, Janus J. Kulikowski, Neil R. A. Parry, Declan J. McKeefry, and Ian J. Murray
J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 29(2) A233-A239 (2012)

References

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Citation lists with outbound citation links are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Cited By

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Cited by links are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Figures (3)

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Figure files are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Metrics

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Article level metrics are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription