Abstract

This is Part II of the work that examines photon diffusion in a homogenous medium enclosed by a concave circular cylindrical applicator or enclosing a convex circular cylindrical applicator. Part I of this work [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 27, 648 (2010)] analytically examined the steady-state photon diffusion between a source and a detector for two specific cases: (1) the detector is placed only azimuthally with respect to the source, and (2) the detector is placed only longitudinally with respect to the source, in the infinitely long concave and convex applicator geometries. For the first case, it was predicted that the decay rate of photon fluence would become smaller in the concave geometry and greater in the convex geometry than that in the semi-infinite geometry for the same source–detector distance. For the second case, it was projected that the decay rate of photon fluence would be greater in the concave geometry and smaller in the convex geometry than that in the semi-infinite geometry for the same source–detector distance. This Part II of the work quantitatively examines these predictions from Part I through several approaches, including (a) the finite-element method, (b) the Monte Carlo simulation, and (c) experimental measurement. Despite that the quantitative examinations have to be conducted for finite cylinder applicators with large length-to-radius ratio to approximate the infinite-length condition modeled in Part I, the results obtained by these quantitative methods for two concave and three convex applicator dimensions validated the qualitative trend predicted by Part I and verified the quantitative accuracy of the analytic treatment of Part I in the diffusion regime of the measurement, at a given set of absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of the medium.

© 2011 Optical Society of America

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