Abstract

Wideband enhancement was implemented by detecting visually relevant edge and bar features in an image to produce a bipolar contour map. The addition of these contours to the original image resulted in increased local contrast of these features and an increase in the spatial bandwidth of the image. Testing with static television images revealed that visually impaired patients (n=35) could distinguish the enhanced images and preferred them over the original images (and degraded images). Most patients preferred a moderate level of wideband enhancement, since they preferred natural-looking images and rejected visible artifacts of the enhancement. Comparison of the enhanced images with the originals revealed that the improvement in the perceived image quality was significant for only 22% of the patients. Possible reasons for the limited increase in perceived image quality are discussed, and improvements are suggested.

© 2004 Optical Society of America

Full Article  |  PDF Article

References

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Citation lists with outbound citation links are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Cited By

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Cited by links are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Figures (8)

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Figure files are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Tables (3)

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Article tables are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Metrics

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Article level metrics are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription