Abstract

We measured the lowest velocity (velocity threshold) for discriminating motion direction in relative and uniform motion stimuli, varying the contrast and the spatial frequency of the stimulus gratings. The results showed significant differences in the effects of contrast and spatial frequency on the threshold, as well as on the absolute threshold level between the two motion conditions, except when the contrast was 1% or lower. Little effect of spatial frequency was found for uniform motion, whereas a bandpass property with a peak at approximately 5 cycles per degree was found for relative motion. It was also found that contrast had little effect on uniform motion, whereas the threshold decreased with increases in contrast up to 85% for relative motion. These differences cannot be attributed to possible differences in eye movements between the relative and the uniform motion conditions, because the spatial-frequency characteristics differed in the two conditions even when the presentation duration was short enough to prevent eye movements. The differences also cannot be attributed to detecting positional changes, because the velocity threshold was not determined by the total distance of the stimulus movements. These results suggest that there are two different motion pathways: one that specializes in relative motion and one that specializes in uniform or global motion. A simulation showed that the difference in the response functions of the two possible pathways accounts for the differences in the spatial-frequency and contrast dependency of the velocity threshold.

© 2002 Optical Society of America

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