Abstract

Many visual tasks can be carried out by using several sources of information. The most accurate estimates of scene properties require the observer to utilize all available information and to combine the information sources in an optimal manner. Two experiments are described that required the observers to judge the relative locations of two texture-defined edges (a vernier task). The edges were signaled by a change across the edge of two texture properties [either frequency and orientation (Experiment 1) or contrast and orientation (Experiment 2)]. The reliability of each cue was controlled by varying the distance over which the change (in frequency, orientation, or contrast) occurred—a kind of “texture blur.” In some conditions, the position of the edge signaled by one cue was shifted relative to the other (“perturbation analysis”). An ideal-observer model, previously used in studies of depth perception and color constancy, was fitted to the data. Although the fit can be rejected relative to some more elaborate models, especially given the large quantity of data, this model does account for most trends in the data. A second, suboptimal model that switches between the available cues from trial to trial does a poor job of accounting for the data.

© 2001 Optical Society of America

Full Article  |  PDF Article
OSA Recommended Articles
Texture and haptic cues in slant discrimination:  reliability-based cue weighting without statistically optimal cue combination

Pedro Rosas, Johan Wagemans, Marc O. Ernst, and Felix A. Wichmann
J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 22(5) 801-809 (2005)

Histogram contrast analysis and the visual segregation of IID textures

Charles Chubb, John Econopouly, and Michael S. Landy
J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 11(9) 2350-2374 (1994)

Starry night: a texture devoid of depth cues

Xenophon Zabulis and Benjamin T. Backus
J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 21(11) 2049-2060 (2004)

References

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Citation lists with outbound citation links are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Cited By

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Cited by links are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Figures (11)

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Figure files are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Tables (2)

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Article tables are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Equations (7)

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Equations are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Metrics

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Article level metrics are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription