Abstract

Previous studies have demonstrated that the onset of temporal aliasing artifacts occurs when the spatial displacement between samples reaches a critical distance, and that subsequently a linear relationship exists between stimulus speed and critical sampling rates. In this paper, we carry out further experimentation using a novel experimental setup, in which a strobe light is used to emulate impulsive temporal sampling, in order to investigate the spatiotemporal envelope of the human visual system and the effect of a stimulus. For non-periodic stimuli, experimental results show that critical sampling rates increase with motion speed and decrease with stimulus width. These interactions can be described using simple log-linear models, and characterized using the temporal aliasing visibility function, where maximum critical frame rates up to 1500 Hz are predicted. For periodic stimuli, we demonstrate that both perceptible temporal aliasing artifacts and stimulus aliasing can cause stroboscopic effects.

© 2020 Optical Society of America

Full Article  |  PDF Article

References

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Citation lists with outbound citation links are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Cited By

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Cited by links are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Figures (16)

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Figure files are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Equations (21)

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Equations are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription