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References

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  1. Jour. Am. Chem. Soc. 36, 1859, 1914.

1914 (1)

Jour. Am. Chem. Soc. 36, 1859, 1914.

Jour. Am. Chem. Soc. (1)

Jour. Am. Chem. Soc. 36, 1859, 1914.

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Figures (5)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

View of recording parts of the mechanism. The white horizontal strip near the top of the picture shows the photographic paper which has been exposed but not developed. Just below this strip is shown a section of paper which has been developed and rinsed, and which is passing into the fixing bath. In the lower section of the picture is shown the paper after it has been fixed and washed. The paper is dried between the time it emerges from the washing trough until it arrives at the roll on which it is wound.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

Typical record from automatic recorder. Direction of travel of the paper is toward the left. Figures at top of chart indicate time. Spaces between parallel lines represent minutes. In the present instance vertical spaces represent one degree each or a total of ten degrees between bottom and top of the chart. The short dashes in the horizontal line near the top of the chart indicate the time intervals during which a heating unit was thrown into the circuit. It will be noted that each one of these corresponds to an abrupt rise in the upper graph. This graph represents the temperature of the sensitive member of a thermoregulator controlling oven temperature while the lower graph represents the temperature of a small quantity of material in a drying dish in the oven.

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

Median vertical section of recorder mechanism.

Fig. 4
Fig. 4

Schematic diagram of circuits which constitute the potentiometers for the thermoelements.