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  1. Luckiesh, Color and Its Applications, Maxwell’s Disks, p. 61; 1915.
  2. Talbot, Phil. Mag. Series 3,  5, p. 321; 1834.
  3. P. G. Nutting, A Photometer Attachment for Spectrometers, .
  4. L. T. Troland, Report of Committee on Colorimetry J. O. S. A., 6, No. 6, p. 548; August, 1922.
  5. Obtained from the determination by C. G. Abbot of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, as given by L. T. Troland in the Report of Committee on Colorimetry for 1920–21, J. O. S. A.,  6, No. 6, p. 560; August, 1922.
  6. L. T. Troland, Report of Committee on Colorimetry, J. O. S. A., 6, No. 6, p. 549; August, 1922.
  7. L. T. Troland, Report of Committee on Colorimetry, 1920–1921, J. O. S. & R. S. I.,  6, p. 575, 1922.
  8. L. T. Troland, Report of the Committee on Colorimetry, 1920–1921, J. O. S. A.,  6, No. 6, p. 580; August, 1922.
  9. L. T. Troland, Report of the Committee on Colorimetry, 1920–1921, J.O.S.A.,  6, No. 6, p. 551; August, 1922.
  10. A. H. Pfund, On the Use of the Rotating Sector in Photometry, Psychol. Rev.,  21, pp. 116–120; 1914.
    [Crossref]
  11. L. T. Troland, Report of Committee on Colorimetry for 1920–1921, J. O. S. A.,  6, No. 6, p. 553; August, 1922.
  12. All papers that the writer has used check out satisfactorily. This includes beside the Milton-Bradley assortment, a number of the Hering papers prepared by Stoelting.
  13. The papers of the Munsell Color System all yield absorption spectra fairly similar to those of Figs. 1, 2, and 3. See “An Examination of the Munsell Color System” I. G. Priest, .

1915 (1)

Luckiesh, Color and Its Applications, Maxwell’s Disks, p. 61; 1915.

1914 (1)

A. H. Pfund, On the Use of the Rotating Sector in Photometry, Psychol. Rev.,  21, pp. 116–120; 1914.
[Crossref]

1834 (1)

Talbot, Phil. Mag. Series 3,  5, p. 321; 1834.

Luckiesh,

Luckiesh, Color and Its Applications, Maxwell’s Disks, p. 61; 1915.

Nutting, P. G.

P. G. Nutting, A Photometer Attachment for Spectrometers, .

Pfund, A. H.

A. H. Pfund, On the Use of the Rotating Sector in Photometry, Psychol. Rev.,  21, pp. 116–120; 1914.
[Crossref]

Priest, I. G.

The papers of the Munsell Color System all yield absorption spectra fairly similar to those of Figs. 1, 2, and 3. See “An Examination of the Munsell Color System” I. G. Priest, .

Talbot,

Talbot, Phil. Mag. Series 3,  5, p. 321; 1834.

Troland, L. T.

L. T. Troland, Report of Committee on Colorimetry for 1920–1921, J. O. S. A.,  6, No. 6, p. 553; August, 1922.

L. T. Troland, Report of Committee on Colorimetry J. O. S. A., 6, No. 6, p. 548; August, 1922.

Obtained from the determination by C. G. Abbot of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, as given by L. T. Troland in the Report of Committee on Colorimetry for 1920–21, J. O. S. A.,  6, No. 6, p. 560; August, 1922.

L. T. Troland, Report of Committee on Colorimetry, J. O. S. A., 6, No. 6, p. 549; August, 1922.

L. T. Troland, Report of Committee on Colorimetry, 1920–1921, J. O. S. & R. S. I.,  6, p. 575, 1922.

L. T. Troland, Report of the Committee on Colorimetry, 1920–1921, J. O. S. A.,  6, No. 6, p. 580; August, 1922.

L. T. Troland, Report of the Committee on Colorimetry, 1920–1921, J.O.S.A.,  6, No. 6, p. 551; August, 1922.

Maxwell’s Disks (1)

Luckiesh, Color and Its Applications, Maxwell’s Disks, p. 61; 1915.

Phil. Mag. Series 3 (1)

Talbot, Phil. Mag. Series 3,  5, p. 321; 1834.

Psychol. Rev. (1)

A. H. Pfund, On the Use of the Rotating Sector in Photometry, Psychol. Rev.,  21, pp. 116–120; 1914.
[Crossref]

Other (10)

L. T. Troland, Report of Committee on Colorimetry for 1920–1921, J. O. S. A.,  6, No. 6, p. 553; August, 1922.

All papers that the writer has used check out satisfactorily. This includes beside the Milton-Bradley assortment, a number of the Hering papers prepared by Stoelting.

The papers of the Munsell Color System all yield absorption spectra fairly similar to those of Figs. 1, 2, and 3. See “An Examination of the Munsell Color System” I. G. Priest, .

P. G. Nutting, A Photometer Attachment for Spectrometers, .

L. T. Troland, Report of Committee on Colorimetry J. O. S. A., 6, No. 6, p. 548; August, 1922.

Obtained from the determination by C. G. Abbot of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, as given by L. T. Troland in the Report of Committee on Colorimetry for 1920–21, J. O. S. A.,  6, No. 6, p. 560; August, 1922.

L. T. Troland, Report of Committee on Colorimetry, J. O. S. A., 6, No. 6, p. 549; August, 1922.

L. T. Troland, Report of Committee on Colorimetry, 1920–1921, J. O. S. & R. S. I.,  6, p. 575, 1922.

L. T. Troland, Report of the Committee on Colorimetry, 1920–1921, J. O. S. A.,  6, No. 6, p. 580; August, 1922.

L. T. Troland, Report of the Committee on Colorimetry, 1920–1921, J.O.S.A.,  6, No. 6, p. 551; August, 1922.

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Figures (6)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

The absorption spectra of a family of seven papers, ranging in hue from “red” to “yellow.” These papers are grouped together because they show the common characteristic of absorbing the short wave-lengths to a marked degree, and of reflecting almost entirely all energy in the longer wave-lengths. The last three curves (yellows) may (together with the yellow-green of Fig. 2) be separated from the other eleven papers because, with no falling off of saturation, they still yield brightnesses of about twice the others. (See sixth column, Table 1.)

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

The absorption spectra of a family of four papers ranging in hue from “yellow-green” to “green-blue.” These papers are grouped together because they show the common characteristic of absorbing to a degree both the extremely long and the extremely short wave-lengths, but reflect a large proportion of the energy in the intermediate wave-lengths. To this group has been added, for the sake of convenience in plotting, the absorption spectrum characteristic of the “black” which was used with the standard “white” to form the comparison gray.

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

The absorption spectra of a family of four curves ranging in hue from “blue” to “red-violet.” The common characteristic of this family is the absorption of the energy between wave-lengths 510 (green) and 600 (orange) and the partial reflection of the short wave-lengths.

Fig. 4
Fig. 4

The details of calculation for the continuous stimulus equivalents, non-selective type. The circles represent the absorption spectra of the components weighted according to the complementary proportions; the dots, the continuous stimulus equivalent.

Fig. 5
Fig. 5

The details of calculation for the continuous stimulus equivalents, selective type. As in Fig. 4, the circles characterize the components; the dots, the continuous stimulus equivalent.

Fig. 6
Fig. 6

The combination curves grouped as non-selectives and selectives. It is to be noticed that the six non-selectives all involve considerable “yellow” (4Y1R, Y, 4Y1G and YG) while the selectives involve no yellow at all. The vertical scale is the same (Absorption in Per cent) as in the other figures, but, for convenience in plotting, the origin of the scale for each curve is shifted vertically.

Tables (5)

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Table 1 To Specify, Exactly, the Colors Being Dealt With

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Table 2 To show with how Much Accuracy the Combination Curves Yield “White.”(Non-selective combinations)

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Table 3 (Selective combinations)

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Table 4 Constancy of the Beam Components in the Selective Equivalents

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Table 5 The spectral reflection* of the papers investigated, as calculated directly from the spectrophotometric settings

Equations (2)

Equations on this page are rendered with MathJax. Learn more.

Per cent absorption = 100 [ 1 - antilog 10 ( - 2 log cosine θ ) ]
A = K 1 A 1 + K 2 A 2 + K 3 A 3 etc .