Abstract

The spectra of the O12 branch belonging to the NO γ(0, 0) band have been observed by means of single-beam two-photon excitation at high temperature. Some spectral lines that were not seen at room temperature were observed. The wavelengths of the dye laser, which is a light source for two-photon excitation, were measured, and various constants for NO molecules were evaluated.

© 1983 Optical Society of America

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References

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  1. R. G. Bray, R. M. Hochstrasser, and J. E. Wessel, “Continuously tunable two-photon excitation of individual rotational levels of the A2∑+ state of nitric oxide,” Chem. Phys. Lett. 27, 167–171 (1974).
    [CrossRef]
  2. T. Ozaki, Y. Matsui, and T. Ohsawa, “Rotational temperature measurement of NO gas using two-photon excitation spectrum,” J. Appl. Phys. 52, 2593–2595 (1981).
    [CrossRef]
  3. K. P. Huber and G. Herzberg, Molecular Spectra and Molecular Structure IV. Constants of Diatomic Molecules (Van Nostrand Reinhold, New York, 1979), p. 474.
  4. J. W. C. Johns, J. Reid, and D. W. Lepard, “The vibration–rotation fundamental of NO,” J. Mol. Spectrosc. 65, 155–162 (1977).
    [CrossRef]
  5. A. Timmermann and R. Wallenstein, “Doppler-free two-photon excitation of nitric oxide with frequency-stabilized cw dye laser radiation,” Opt. Commun. 39, 239–242 (1981).
    [CrossRef]
  6. G. Herzberg, Molecular Spectra and Molecular Structure I. Spectra of Diatomic Molecules, 2nd ed. (Van Nostrand Reinhold, New York, 1950).
  7. M. Born and E. Wolf, Principles of Optics, 6th ed. (Pergamon, Oxford, 1980), p. 338.

1981 (2)

T. Ozaki, Y. Matsui, and T. Ohsawa, “Rotational temperature measurement of NO gas using two-photon excitation spectrum,” J. Appl. Phys. 52, 2593–2595 (1981).
[CrossRef]

A. Timmermann and R. Wallenstein, “Doppler-free two-photon excitation of nitric oxide with frequency-stabilized cw dye laser radiation,” Opt. Commun. 39, 239–242 (1981).
[CrossRef]

1977 (1)

J. W. C. Johns, J. Reid, and D. W. Lepard, “The vibration–rotation fundamental of NO,” J. Mol. Spectrosc. 65, 155–162 (1977).
[CrossRef]

1974 (1)

R. G. Bray, R. M. Hochstrasser, and J. E. Wessel, “Continuously tunable two-photon excitation of individual rotational levels of the A2∑+ state of nitric oxide,” Chem. Phys. Lett. 27, 167–171 (1974).
[CrossRef]

Born, M.

M. Born and E. Wolf, Principles of Optics, 6th ed. (Pergamon, Oxford, 1980), p. 338.

Bray, R. G.

R. G. Bray, R. M. Hochstrasser, and J. E. Wessel, “Continuously tunable two-photon excitation of individual rotational levels of the A2∑+ state of nitric oxide,” Chem. Phys. Lett. 27, 167–171 (1974).
[CrossRef]

Herzberg, G.

K. P. Huber and G. Herzberg, Molecular Spectra and Molecular Structure IV. Constants of Diatomic Molecules (Van Nostrand Reinhold, New York, 1979), p. 474.

G. Herzberg, Molecular Spectra and Molecular Structure I. Spectra of Diatomic Molecules, 2nd ed. (Van Nostrand Reinhold, New York, 1950).

Hochstrasser, R. M.

R. G. Bray, R. M. Hochstrasser, and J. E. Wessel, “Continuously tunable two-photon excitation of individual rotational levels of the A2∑+ state of nitric oxide,” Chem. Phys. Lett. 27, 167–171 (1974).
[CrossRef]

Huber, K. P.

K. P. Huber and G. Herzberg, Molecular Spectra and Molecular Structure IV. Constants of Diatomic Molecules (Van Nostrand Reinhold, New York, 1979), p. 474.

Johns, J. W. C.

J. W. C. Johns, J. Reid, and D. W. Lepard, “The vibration–rotation fundamental of NO,” J. Mol. Spectrosc. 65, 155–162 (1977).
[CrossRef]

Lepard, D. W.

J. W. C. Johns, J. Reid, and D. W. Lepard, “The vibration–rotation fundamental of NO,” J. Mol. Spectrosc. 65, 155–162 (1977).
[CrossRef]

Matsui, Y.

T. Ozaki, Y. Matsui, and T. Ohsawa, “Rotational temperature measurement of NO gas using two-photon excitation spectrum,” J. Appl. Phys. 52, 2593–2595 (1981).
[CrossRef]

Ohsawa, T.

T. Ozaki, Y. Matsui, and T. Ohsawa, “Rotational temperature measurement of NO gas using two-photon excitation spectrum,” J. Appl. Phys. 52, 2593–2595 (1981).
[CrossRef]

Ozaki, T.

T. Ozaki, Y. Matsui, and T. Ohsawa, “Rotational temperature measurement of NO gas using two-photon excitation spectrum,” J. Appl. Phys. 52, 2593–2595 (1981).
[CrossRef]

Reid, J.

J. W. C. Johns, J. Reid, and D. W. Lepard, “The vibration–rotation fundamental of NO,” J. Mol. Spectrosc. 65, 155–162 (1977).
[CrossRef]

Timmermann, A.

A. Timmermann and R. Wallenstein, “Doppler-free two-photon excitation of nitric oxide with frequency-stabilized cw dye laser radiation,” Opt. Commun. 39, 239–242 (1981).
[CrossRef]

Wallenstein, R.

A. Timmermann and R. Wallenstein, “Doppler-free two-photon excitation of nitric oxide with frequency-stabilized cw dye laser radiation,” Opt. Commun. 39, 239–242 (1981).
[CrossRef]

Wessel, J. E.

R. G. Bray, R. M. Hochstrasser, and J. E. Wessel, “Continuously tunable two-photon excitation of individual rotational levels of the A2∑+ state of nitric oxide,” Chem. Phys. Lett. 27, 167–171 (1974).
[CrossRef]

Wolf, E.

M. Born and E. Wolf, Principles of Optics, 6th ed. (Pergamon, Oxford, 1980), p. 338.

Chem. Phys. Lett. (1)

R. G. Bray, R. M. Hochstrasser, and J. E. Wessel, “Continuously tunable two-photon excitation of individual rotational levels of the A2∑+ state of nitric oxide,” Chem. Phys. Lett. 27, 167–171 (1974).
[CrossRef]

J. Appl. Phys. (1)

T. Ozaki, Y. Matsui, and T. Ohsawa, “Rotational temperature measurement of NO gas using two-photon excitation spectrum,” J. Appl. Phys. 52, 2593–2595 (1981).
[CrossRef]

J. Mol. Spectrosc. (1)

J. W. C. Johns, J. Reid, and D. W. Lepard, “The vibration–rotation fundamental of NO,” J. Mol. Spectrosc. 65, 155–162 (1977).
[CrossRef]

Opt. Commun. (1)

A. Timmermann and R. Wallenstein, “Doppler-free two-photon excitation of nitric oxide with frequency-stabilized cw dye laser radiation,” Opt. Commun. 39, 239–242 (1981).
[CrossRef]

Other (3)

G. Herzberg, Molecular Spectra and Molecular Structure I. Spectra of Diatomic Molecules, 2nd ed. (Van Nostrand Reinhold, New York, 1950).

M. Born and E. Wolf, Principles of Optics, 6th ed. (Pergamon, Oxford, 1980), p. 338.

K. P. Huber and G. Herzberg, Molecular Spectra and Molecular Structure IV. Constants of Diatomic Molecules (Van Nostrand Reinhold, New York, 1979), p. 474.

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Figures (6)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Experimental diagram for obtaining the two-photon excitation spectra. The NO gas was excited by the pulsed continuously tunable dye laser, which was pumped by the N2 laser. The fluorescent light from NO was detected by the solar-blind photomultiplier.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

Two-photon excitation spectra of the NO γ(0, 0) band O12 branch. (a) and (b) are the spectra when the NO cell temperatures were 700 and 300 K, respectively. In (a) new spectral lines that have not been seen in (b) were observed ①– ⑥).

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

Comparison between calculated transition energies of the respective rotational lines and the spectrum actually obtained. The observed values and the calculated values were matched at two points: J = 4½ and J = 11½ (arrows); then the relative positions were assigned, (a) and (b) use the values of contants from Refs. 3 and 6, respectively.

Fig. 4
Fig. 4

Experimental setup to measure the dye-laser wavelengths. The dye-laser beam was divided with a half mirror (H.M.): one beam caused two-photon excitation of NO. The other dye-laser beam illuminated the Fabry–Perot (F.P.) interferometer simultaneously with the beam of an argon-ion laser. An interference pattern was projected on the spectrograph slit S and separated. The argon-ion laser was used as the light source for standard lines.

Fig. 5
Fig. 5

An example of the spectrograms. The spectral line with notation J = 5½ is that of the dye laser corresponding to the rotational quantum number J = 5½ of the O12 branch. The rest are all the spectrum of argon. The numerals represent wavelengths, all in angstroms.

Fig. 6
Fig. 6

Comparison between the spectrum actually observed and transition energies that were calculated with the new constants obtained. The relative positions were allotted after observed values, and the calculated values were matched at two points: J = 4½ and J = 11½ (arrows).

Tables (2)

Tables Icon

Table 1 Observed Dye-Laser Wavolongths Corresponding to Rotational Lines [NO γ(0, 0) Band O12 Branch]a

Tables Icon

Table 2 Comparison of the Various Constants for NO Molecules in Reciprocal Centimeters

Equations (5)

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O 12 ( J ) = ν 00 ( 2 ) + F 1 ( J 2 ) F 2 ( J ) ν 00 ( 2 ) + B ( J 5 / 2 ) ( J 3 / 2 ) D ( J 5 / 2 ) 2 ( J 3 / 2 ) 2 B eff . ( 2 ) J ( J + 1 ) + D J 2 ( J + 1 ) 2 , J = 5 / 2 , 7 / 2 , ,
( m 11 + e 1 ) λ 1 = ( m 12 + e 2 ) λ 2 = ( m 13 + e 3 ) λ 3 = = 2 H .
e = ( q 1 ) D p 2 ( p 1 ) D q 2 D q 2 D p 2 ,
m 1 R + e R = 2 H λ R ( m 1 R + e R ) Δ λ R λ R ,
λ R = 2 H m 1 R + e R .