Abstract

We measure threshold for a vertical test grating superimposed on a fixed-contrast horizontal background grating of the same spatial and temporal frequency. The rate of change of this threshold with increasing contrast of the background grating is a measure of the contrast gain of the responding mechanism. Large slopes (high contrast gains) occur when spatial frequency is low and temporal frequency is high; small slopes (low contrast gains) occur when both spatial and temporal frequencies are low and when spatial frequency is high. This division of the spatiotemporal frequency domain into low- and high-gain regions is consistent with the transient/sustained dichotomy found in previous psychophysical studies. Furthermore, our results suggest that the mechanism responsible for detecting low spatial frequencies has a gain characteristic similar to that of cat retina Y cells and that the mechanism responsible for detecting high spatial frequencies has a gain characteristic similar to that of cat retina X cells, as found by Shapley and Victor [ J. Physiol. (London) 285, 275– 298 ( 1978)].

© 1981 Optical Society of America

Full Article  |  PDF Article
Related Articles
Adaptability of the visual system is inversely related to its sensitivity

Robert J. Snowden
J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 11(1) 25-32 (1994)

Orientation bandwidths of spatial mechanisms measured by masking

Gregory C. Phillips and Hugh R. Wilson
J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 1(2) 226-232 (1984)

Visual sensitivity in the presence of a patterned background

Alan W. Freeman and David R. Badcock
J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 16(5) 979-986 (1999)

References

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Citation lists with outbound citation links are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Cited By

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Cited by links are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Figures (13)

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Figure files are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Tables (1)

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Article tables are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription