Abstract

PDF Article

References

  • View by:
  • |

  1. Weiss and Koenigsberger, Ann. d. Phys., (4) 35, p. 21; 1911.
  2. Koenigsberger, Ann. d. Phys., (4) 47, p. 563; 1915.
  3. Cermak and Schmidt, Ann. d. Phys. (4) 36, p. 579; 1911.
  4. Siebel, Inaug. Diss., Kiel; 1914.
  5. Darling and Grace, Proc. Lond. Phys. Soc., 30, p. 14; 1917.
  6. Pelabon, Ann. de Physique 13, p. 169; 1920.
  7. Bureau of Standards Circular No. 66, p. 6.
  8. Similarly, if battery b2 is balanced against the standard cell with circuit B closed, then B should be balanced with circuit C open, i.e. with b2 connected to R′. An illustration of the advantageous use of this second method is the employment of a White potentiometer designed to give strictly constant resistance in the galvanometer circuit with the battery circuits open, in which case key K and battery b1 could be eliminated. If the resistance of circuit C could be made simultaneously independent of the dial settings with circuit B closed, then manipulation would be reduced to the simplicity of the ordinary potentiometer. The method has its greatest applicability for the measurement of extremely small emfs, when the interaction of the above effects would become negligible and manipulation would be equally simple. In adjusting circuit D to eliminate stray emfs, battery b2 need not be replaced in circuit C by an equal resistance because of the negligible cefect of leaving circuit C open during the operation.
  9. Described by Burgess, "Measurement of High Temperatures" 3d ed, p. 419.
  10. Richardson, The Electron Theory of Matter (1914), p. 461. It has been long recognized, as stated on page 462, that formulas of this type are very unsatisfactory.
  11. Northrup and Suydam J. Frank. Inst., 175, p. 159; 1913.

Other (11)

Weiss and Koenigsberger, Ann. d. Phys., (4) 35, p. 21; 1911.

Koenigsberger, Ann. d. Phys., (4) 47, p. 563; 1915.

Cermak and Schmidt, Ann. d. Phys. (4) 36, p. 579; 1911.

Siebel, Inaug. Diss., Kiel; 1914.

Darling and Grace, Proc. Lond. Phys. Soc., 30, p. 14; 1917.

Pelabon, Ann. de Physique 13, p. 169; 1920.

Bureau of Standards Circular No. 66, p. 6.

Similarly, if battery b2 is balanced against the standard cell with circuit B closed, then B should be balanced with circuit C open, i.e. with b2 connected to R′. An illustration of the advantageous use of this second method is the employment of a White potentiometer designed to give strictly constant resistance in the galvanometer circuit with the battery circuits open, in which case key K and battery b1 could be eliminated. If the resistance of circuit C could be made simultaneously independent of the dial settings with circuit B closed, then manipulation would be reduced to the simplicity of the ordinary potentiometer. The method has its greatest applicability for the measurement of extremely small emfs, when the interaction of the above effects would become negligible and manipulation would be equally simple. In adjusting circuit D to eliminate stray emfs, battery b2 need not be replaced in circuit C by an equal resistance because of the negligible cefect of leaving circuit C open during the operation.

Described by Burgess, "Measurement of High Temperatures" 3d ed, p. 419.

Richardson, The Electron Theory of Matter (1914), p. 461. It has been long recognized, as stated on page 462, that formulas of this type are very unsatisfactory.

Northrup and Suydam J. Frank. Inst., 175, p. 159; 1913.

Cited By

OSA participates in CrossRef's Cited-By Linking service. Citing articles from OSA journals and other participating publishers are listed here.

Alert me when this article is cited.