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Figures (4)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

(1) The 180 degree markings appear on both temporal and nasal sides for each eye, all four on one continuous line, as shown by the long horizontal rod resting on four supporting pins. (2) Grooved friction wheel to rotate trial cylinders. (3) Wheel for centering trial cells. (4) Wheel for raising or lowering perforated, conforming nose rest. (5) Set screw for positioning nose rest forward or back. (6) Knob, one for each temple, controlling its spread, securing even tension on both sides of the head and equal distance of both cells from the eyes. (7) Knob for delicate control of the new, separately adjustable tilting temples. Tilt one temple only and the corresponding end of the trial frame is raised. Tilt both equally and the trial frame is tilted forward from the top to the desired angle.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

Each one of the short horizontal rods should be opposite an external canthus when frame is correctly levelled on the patient’s face. When one ear is higher, or the face asymmetric, it becomes necessary to tilt one temple more than the other to bring the continuous horizontal line of the trial frame front opposite and parallel to the line extending from external canthus to external canthus. When both temples are tilted equally the plane of the trial frame front is tilted forward from the top to the desired angle.

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

Tilting both temples equally tilts the plane of the frame front.

Fig. 4
Fig. 4

Tilting one temple independently raises the corresponding temporal end of the trial frame front, maintaining the correct level in the presence of one low ear.