Abstract

Our understanding of atmospheric scattering phenomena has increased through the combined developments of new electro-optical instrumentation, theoretical solutions for complex model atmospheres, and large computers enabling computation of such solutions. Earth satellites permit external, planetwide observations of our atmosphere, while spacecraft permit detailed measurements of the scattering by other planetary atmospheres. Some recent results are: elucidation of the effects of ozone absorption and high-altitude aerosol scattering on twilight colors and polarization; identification of a cloudbow on Venus and consequent deduction of the cloud particle shape, size distribution, and refractive index; and, the interpretation of Rayleigh scattering on Jupiter in terms of cloud-top topography.

© 1979 Optical Society of America

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