Abstract

By defining texture as a global feature attained by integration over the image domain, we show that texture discrimination can be predicted for a special class of visual textures (composed of paired dots) as a function of such global features. We derive a psychophysical law based on these global features and show that differences in the variance of orientation, but not of dipole length, result in texture discrimination.

© 1979 Optical Society of America

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References

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  1. B. Julesz, “Visual texture discrimination,” IRE Trans. Inf. Theory IT-8, 84–92 (1962).
    [Crossref]
  2. The definition and properties of dipole statistics have been mentioned already in many places (Refs. 3, 4, 5, and 6). However, in this context a dipole is a vector between two points of an image, and the dipole statistics refers to the total distribution of such dipoles over the whole image. The dipole statistics (also called the second-order joint probability distribution) determine the autocorrelation function, whose Fourier transform is the power (amplitude) spectrum.
  3. B. Julesz, “Experiments in the visual perception of texture,” Sci. Am. 232, 34–43 (April1975).
    [Crossref] [PubMed]
  4. B. Julesz, E. N. Gilbert, L. A. Shepp, and H. Frisch, “Inability of humans to discriminate between visual textures that agree in second-order statistics—revisited,” Perception 2, 391–405 (1973).
    [Crossref]
  5. B. Julesz, Foundations of Cyclopean Perception, (University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, 1971).
  6. B. Julesz, “Visual texture discrimination using random-dot patterns: Comment,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. 68, 268–270 (1978).
    [Crossref] [PubMed]
  7. T. M. Caelli and B. Julesz, “On perceptual analyzers underlying visual texture discrimination: Part I,” Biol. Cybernetics 28, 167–175 (1978).
    [Crossref]
  8. T. M. Caelli, B. Julesz, and E. N. Gilbert, “On perceptual analyzers underlying visual texture discrimination: Part II,” Biol. Cybernetics 29, 201–214 (1978).
    [Crossref]
  9. B. Julesz, E. N. Gilbert, and J. D. Victor, “Visual texture discrimination of textures with identical third-order statistics,” Biol. Cybernetics 31, 137–140 (1978).
    [Crossref]
  10. K. A. Stevens, “Computation of locally parallel structure,” Biol. Cybernetics 29, 19–28 (1978).
    [Crossref]
  11. B. Julesz, “The role of terminators in preattentive perception of line textures” (to be published).

1978 (5)

T. M. Caelli and B. Julesz, “On perceptual analyzers underlying visual texture discrimination: Part I,” Biol. Cybernetics 28, 167–175 (1978).
[Crossref]

T. M. Caelli, B. Julesz, and E. N. Gilbert, “On perceptual analyzers underlying visual texture discrimination: Part II,” Biol. Cybernetics 29, 201–214 (1978).
[Crossref]

B. Julesz, E. N. Gilbert, and J. D. Victor, “Visual texture discrimination of textures with identical third-order statistics,” Biol. Cybernetics 31, 137–140 (1978).
[Crossref]

K. A. Stevens, “Computation of locally parallel structure,” Biol. Cybernetics 29, 19–28 (1978).
[Crossref]

B. Julesz, “Visual texture discrimination using random-dot patterns: Comment,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. 68, 268–270 (1978).
[Crossref] [PubMed]

1975 (1)

B. Julesz, “Experiments in the visual perception of texture,” Sci. Am. 232, 34–43 (April1975).
[Crossref] [PubMed]

1973 (1)

B. Julesz, E. N. Gilbert, L. A. Shepp, and H. Frisch, “Inability of humans to discriminate between visual textures that agree in second-order statistics—revisited,” Perception 2, 391–405 (1973).
[Crossref]

1962 (1)

B. Julesz, “Visual texture discrimination,” IRE Trans. Inf. Theory IT-8, 84–92 (1962).
[Crossref]

Caelli, T. M.

T. M. Caelli and B. Julesz, “On perceptual analyzers underlying visual texture discrimination: Part I,” Biol. Cybernetics 28, 167–175 (1978).
[Crossref]

T. M. Caelli, B. Julesz, and E. N. Gilbert, “On perceptual analyzers underlying visual texture discrimination: Part II,” Biol. Cybernetics 29, 201–214 (1978).
[Crossref]

Frisch, H.

B. Julesz, E. N. Gilbert, L. A. Shepp, and H. Frisch, “Inability of humans to discriminate between visual textures that agree in second-order statistics—revisited,” Perception 2, 391–405 (1973).
[Crossref]

Gilbert, E. N.

T. M. Caelli, B. Julesz, and E. N. Gilbert, “On perceptual analyzers underlying visual texture discrimination: Part II,” Biol. Cybernetics 29, 201–214 (1978).
[Crossref]

B. Julesz, E. N. Gilbert, and J. D. Victor, “Visual texture discrimination of textures with identical third-order statistics,” Biol. Cybernetics 31, 137–140 (1978).
[Crossref]

B. Julesz, E. N. Gilbert, L. A. Shepp, and H. Frisch, “Inability of humans to discriminate between visual textures that agree in second-order statistics—revisited,” Perception 2, 391–405 (1973).
[Crossref]

Julesz, B.

T. M. Caelli and B. Julesz, “On perceptual analyzers underlying visual texture discrimination: Part I,” Biol. Cybernetics 28, 167–175 (1978).
[Crossref]

B. Julesz, E. N. Gilbert, and J. D. Victor, “Visual texture discrimination of textures with identical third-order statistics,” Biol. Cybernetics 31, 137–140 (1978).
[Crossref]

T. M. Caelli, B. Julesz, and E. N. Gilbert, “On perceptual analyzers underlying visual texture discrimination: Part II,” Biol. Cybernetics 29, 201–214 (1978).
[Crossref]

B. Julesz, “Visual texture discrimination using random-dot patterns: Comment,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. 68, 268–270 (1978).
[Crossref] [PubMed]

B. Julesz, “Experiments in the visual perception of texture,” Sci. Am. 232, 34–43 (April1975).
[Crossref] [PubMed]

B. Julesz, E. N. Gilbert, L. A. Shepp, and H. Frisch, “Inability of humans to discriminate between visual textures that agree in second-order statistics—revisited,” Perception 2, 391–405 (1973).
[Crossref]

B. Julesz, “Visual texture discrimination,” IRE Trans. Inf. Theory IT-8, 84–92 (1962).
[Crossref]

B. Julesz, Foundations of Cyclopean Perception, (University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, 1971).

B. Julesz, “The role of terminators in preattentive perception of line textures” (to be published).

Shepp, L. A.

B. Julesz, E. N. Gilbert, L. A. Shepp, and H. Frisch, “Inability of humans to discriminate between visual textures that agree in second-order statistics—revisited,” Perception 2, 391–405 (1973).
[Crossref]

Stevens, K. A.

K. A. Stevens, “Computation of locally parallel structure,” Biol. Cybernetics 29, 19–28 (1978).
[Crossref]

Victor, J. D.

B. Julesz, E. N. Gilbert, and J. D. Victor, “Visual texture discrimination of textures with identical third-order statistics,” Biol. Cybernetics 31, 137–140 (1978).
[Crossref]

Biol. Cybernetics (4)

T. M. Caelli and B. Julesz, “On perceptual analyzers underlying visual texture discrimination: Part I,” Biol. Cybernetics 28, 167–175 (1978).
[Crossref]

T. M. Caelli, B. Julesz, and E. N. Gilbert, “On perceptual analyzers underlying visual texture discrimination: Part II,” Biol. Cybernetics 29, 201–214 (1978).
[Crossref]

B. Julesz, E. N. Gilbert, and J. D. Victor, “Visual texture discrimination of textures with identical third-order statistics,” Biol. Cybernetics 31, 137–140 (1978).
[Crossref]

K. A. Stevens, “Computation of locally parallel structure,” Biol. Cybernetics 29, 19–28 (1978).
[Crossref]

IRE Trans. Inf. Theory (1)

B. Julesz, “Visual texture discrimination,” IRE Trans. Inf. Theory IT-8, 84–92 (1962).
[Crossref]

J. Opt. Soc. Am. (1)

Perception (1)

B. Julesz, E. N. Gilbert, L. A. Shepp, and H. Frisch, “Inability of humans to discriminate between visual textures that agree in second-order statistics—revisited,” Perception 2, 391–405 (1973).
[Crossref]

Sci. Am. (1)

B. Julesz, “Experiments in the visual perception of texture,” Sci. Am. 232, 34–43 (April1975).
[Crossref] [PubMed]

Other (3)

B. Julesz, Foundations of Cyclopean Perception, (University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, 1971).

The definition and properties of dipole statistics have been mentioned already in many places (Refs. 3, 4, 5, and 6). However, in this context a dipole is a vector between two points of an image, and the dipole statistics refers to the total distribution of such dipoles over the whole image. The dipole statistics (also called the second-order joint probability distribution) determine the autocorrelation function, whose Fourier transform is the power (amplitude) spectrum.

B. Julesz, “The role of terminators in preattentive perception of line textures” (to be published).

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Figures (4)

FIG. 1
FIG. 1

Iso-dipole texture pairs which result in texture discrimination due to the differences in (a) collinearity, (b) corner, and (c) closure properties of the dual micropatterns. Bottom shows the micropattern duals that were used to generate the texture pairs shown above.

FIG. 2
FIG. 2

Two textures having uniform micropattern dipole orientation distributions. The left varies between 70–110°; right: 0–180°.

FIG. 3
FIG. 3

Orientation (θ) discrimination thresholds as a function of number of dipole elements. Lines correspond to theoretical predictions [n is the number of micropatterns, c = 180° range, θ = threshold range for discrimination (degrees); bars represent standard deviations in degrees; log is of base e].

FIG. 4
FIG. 4

Left and right textures differ in dipole length variances (left is zero) and no discrimination occurs.

Equations (4)

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A θ ( n ) = n [ 1 θ 2 1 θ 1 ] ,
n [ 1 θ 2 1 θ 1 ] = n [ 1 θ 2 1 θ 1 ] .
θ + d θ = ( n + d n ) c θ n c + θ d n
log n = log θ log ( c θ ) + k ,