Abstract

The spectral sensitivity of the visual photopigments, the interobserver variability in color judgments, and the spectral locus of unique yellow provide three major problems for accounts of <i>X</i>-chromosomal-linked anomalous trichromacy. According to the single-pigment hypothesis, the primary defect in anomalous trichromacy is a wavelength shift in the peak sensitivity of one of the three visual photopigments. We show that this shift results in reduction of the anomalous trichromat's <i>r</i>-g opponent chromatic channel. The distribution of response variability in Rayleigh equation match widths due to factors other than the spectral characteristics of the photopigments is similar in normal and anomalous trichromats. When normal and anomalous trichromats make hue estimations of sets of stimuli designed to contain similar chromatic information, their judgments show similar variability. Calculation of the <i>r</i>-g opponent chromatic channel can provide correct predictions of the spectral loci for unique yellow for anomalous trichromats.

© 1977 Optical Society of America

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