Abstract

Recent experimental measurements of nonlinear, multiple-pulse propagation are presented. Long atmospheric paths were simulated by laboratory scale instrumentation. Blooming was examined as a function of pulse overlap. Observed peak target intensities decreased as the pulse repetition frequency increased and as the effective transverse wind decreased. Theoretical predictions from two computer codes are shown to be consistent with the measurements. A significant fraction of the induced beam distortions were corrected by phase compensation with a deformable mirror.

© 1977 the Optical Society of America

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