Abstract

Longitudinal and transverse shifts of an 8 cm parallel bounded beam of 34.2 GHz (8.77 mm) microwaves totally reflected from a paraffin prism have been investigated. The 45°–45°–90° prism is 18 cm high by 25 cm on the sides and the index of refraction is 1.491. Longitudinal shifts as large as 3 cm have been measured in a single reflection near the critical angle for a beam linearly polarized in the plane of incidence. The shift for perpendicular polarization is approximately half this value. The results are in general agreement with the classical theory for the Goos-Hänchen effect. An incident beam polarized at 45° to the incidence plane produces both parallel and perpendicular polarization shifts with values similar to the above. The shifts for both polarizations are reduced but are still distinctly separate if either a second prism or a metallic reflector is brought into the evanescent wave at millimeter distances from the interface. These results are in accordance with stationary phase calculations for two interfaces. It is found that a small (6 mm) transverse shift results if the prism is illuminated with circularly polarized microwaves.

© 1977 Optical Society of America

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