Abstract

The names given to spectral stimuli from 480 to 610 mµ and to a white-light test stimulus were obtained using 11′ or 21′ diam stimulus fields, exposed for 20 msec in the fovea and for 20 and 200 msec at 5° and 10° in the periphery. The experiment was designed to test the hypothesis that normal color vision is replaced by tritanopic vision in all parts of the retina if the total luminous energy is sufficiently reduced. The results obtained with four observers confirm the presence of tritanopia when small brief stimuli are viewed foveally but fail to confirm it in the periphery. Rather, reduced color vision in the periphery is more nearly characteristic of deuteranomaly which ends ultimately in colorless vision. These results are discussed as giving support to the notion that foveal tritanopia is due to the depressed sensitivity of the blue receptor mechanism found in the central fovea.

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