Abstract

Photoelectrophoretic phenomena have been employed in a new direct color-imaging system. Light-sensitive pigment particles dispersed in highly insulating liquids are subjected simultaneously to strong electric fields and electromagnetic radiant energy. Spectrally selective migration of the particles produces the color image. Absorption characteristics for typical photosensitive pigments are presented. The imaging configuration is described, and the pigment properties required for successful color reproduction are stated.

© 1969 Optical Society of America

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References

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  1. The device was originally used for PUSH xerography with liquid developers (V. Mihajlov, U. S. Patent3,281,241).

Mihajlov, V.

The device was originally used for PUSH xerography with liquid developers (V. Mihajlov, U. S. Patent3,281,241).

Other (1)

The device was originally used for PUSH xerography with liquid developers (V. Mihajlov, U. S. Patent3,281,241).

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Figures (8)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Migration of charged particles in an electric field. Repeated charge exchange produces particle oscillation between electrodes (left); an insulating layer on one of the electrodes prevents repeated charge exchange (right). ○ conducting particles; ● nonconducting particles.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

Photoelectrophoresis—upon exposure to radiant energy in an electric field, conducting particles exchange charge and migrate to the opposite electrode.

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

Laboratory apparatus for photoelectrophoretic imaging.

Fig. 4
Fig. 4

Exposure through an original causes pigment particles to migrate from the copy surface, producing a direct positive image.

Fig. 5
Fig. 5

Image density as a function of applied field. Solid curve is Dmax (no illumination); dotted curve is Dmin (4000 lumens per square meter illuminance). Vertical line is imaging threshold.

Fig. 6
Fig. 6

H & D characteristics of typical monochromatic, photoelectrophoretic images.

Fig. 7
Fig. 7

Photoelectrophoretic imaging principle. During exposure the particle sensitive to 535-nm light absorbs the exposing light of that wavelength, exchanges charge and migrates from the imaging surface (left); after exposure, the image materials absorb all wavelengths except 535 nm, which is reflected to reproduce the original exposure wavelength (right).

Fig. 8
Fig. 8

Quantum yield ((QY) and optical-density (D) data for typical materials used in laboratory photoelectrophoretic imaging. Absorption spectra, d/λ, (– – –); quantum yield (—); image density(– · –).