Abstract

<p>The fundamental invariant of an optical system is the number <i>N</i> of degrees of freedom of the message it can transmit. The spatial bandwidth of the system can be increased over the classical limit by reducing one of the other constituent factors of <i>N</i>. As examples of this invariance theorem <i>N</i>= const. established in Part I of this series [J. Opt. Soc. Am. <b>56</b>, 1463 (1966)], we discuss (a) a system whose spatial-bandwidth increase is achieved by a proportional reduction of its temporal bandwidth, and (b) the airborne synthetic-aperture, terrain-mapping radar, whose spatial resolution comes from exploitation of the temporal degrees of freedom of the received signal. The increase of the spatial bandwidth beyond the classical limit is, however, limited by the appearance of evanescent waves.</p><p>The number of degrees of freedom of the object wave field stored in a hologram is discussed. The storage capacity of the photographic plate, which is proportional to its size times its spatial cutoff frequency, is fully exploited only by single-sideband Fraunhofer but not by single-sideband Fresnel holograms.</p>

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